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That really choked me up! ASD holds a very special place in my heart :) I work 1 to 1 with kids affected by ASD, delivering the therapies and seeing the amazing results absolutely makes every day worth believing in. I laugh every day at work with joy, with humour and sometimes if I dont laugh I might cry, it can be hard sometimes.
Having ASD is a challenge but not a life sentence - the life sentence is dealing with those not affected by ASD, its a constant, ugly battle to get them to open their minds and think a little differently!
Look a little closer, listen a little harder, think a little more compassionately, you will find a complex, quirky, amazing, sensitive and beautiful sole revealing themselves to you.
 

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shadow friend
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Discussion Starter #3
That really choked me up! ASD holds a very special place in my heart :) I work 1 to 1 with kids affected by ASD, delivering the therapies and seeing the amazing results absolutely makes every day worth believing in. I laugh every day at work with joy, with humour and sometimes if I dont laugh I might cry, it can be hard sometimes.
Having ASD is a challenge but not a life sentence - the life sentence is dealing with those not affected by ASD, its a constant, ugly battle to get them to open their minds and think a little differently!
Look a little closer, listen a little harder, think a little more compassionately, you will find a complex, quirky, amazing, sensitive and beautiful soul revealing themselves to you.

:--heart::--heart::--heart:
 

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I bet you do Jo Ellen, you just never realised it...the kid at school who everybody called a geek or a nerd just because he was really into one certain thing, he didnt really make eye contact and didnt really like people being near him. Or the kid that shouted out a lot, swore or said inappropriate things, threatened to hurt one certain person just because their face made them feel angry inside,obsessed over one certain person&couldnt share them, had to be at the front of the line ALL the time, had to win ALL the time,only talked about what they were interested in,one way conversations, obsessed over a 'special interest'-dinosaurs are always popular with ASD kids as is water&toilets, only ate one type of food,gosh the list is endless but the outcome is always the same - isolation&condemnation.
Hey some of the American Governments best kept secrets have been hacked by adults with ASD!!!
What upsets me the most is seeing the news or reading the papers and coming across an article of a young man that has been jailed for some crime (usually a stalker type crime)you read the details and it screams that this person has autism and people just accuse them of being weirdos or perverts - that is a crime committed by those that refuse to acknowledge and understand the complexities of autism.

Autism Spectrum Disorder has such a wide scope of symptoms that every case is different( although they will have certain factors in common).
In my school we have kids with ASD who are non verbal, seemingly uncommunicative and aggressive, in my opinion these kids will be the best catered for throughout life as their symptoms are overt&recognisable by society as a 'disability'. On the other hand we have kids who are foul mouthed, threatening and seem hyper - these are the ones at risk in society, they dont understand social communication(hence swearing,shouting,aggression) if people could only try to understand they dont want to do these things,its very distressing for them,their brains just dont allow them to make sense of the world as we do. A kid with ASD can be very distressed by so many things -wearing clothes, smells,noise,light,losing,sitting. By the same token they can be hyperstimulated by certain sights, noises or objects, almost like a drug high.
I could go on forever on this subject, I feel so passionate about it!!!! Apologies lol
 

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Yeah, there was a boy in my high school who was likely autistic - he was obsessed with trains, tended to speak very loudly, and got argumentative pretty easily. People teased him relentlessly and it broke my heart.
 

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My question is "what is normal?"

Shouldnt we all treat everyone as we would like to be treated. My son has a learning disability but he is a sweet person and those that have taken the time to know him love him. Give people a chance we can all learn something from someone.
 

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Lost Her Mind
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Shouldnt we all treat everyone as we would like to be treated. My son has a learning disability but he is a sweet person and those that have taken the time to know him love him. Give people a chance we can all learn something from someone.
I wish the world was like this... but there are idiots and donkey-holes in the world. Makes me very angry when I think about it.

My twin brother has special needs. He's had his fair share of teasing and tormenting. He went to the same school I did up until 7th grade (the start of junior high) and then started going to a special needs school.

Thank doG, too. Kids are so freaking cruel.

My parents decided to change his school for both his benefit and mine. I used to spend my recesses and free time defending and protecting him from kids... I used to have severe anxiety because of it.

Bah, tangent. Sorry. LOL.
 

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shadow friend
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Discussion Starter #11
What is normal? Normal is a great many things and it does exist as a concrete idea. Normal is, for example, being able to read other's facial expressions. Or being able to live and make it on your own in adulthood. Or not hearing voices in your head always telling you what to do. Or being able to hear when someone speaks to you. Normal is majority rules.
The question here is not if "normal" exists because there is always a norm. The question here is what's so great about normal anyways? Or so bad about not being that? An aspie named Temple Grandin quoted:
“In an ideal world the scientist should find a method to prevent the most severe forms of autism but allow the milder forms to survive. After all, the really social people did not invent the first stone spear. It was probably invented by an Aspie who chipped away at rocks while the other people socialized around the campfire. Without autism traits we might still be living in caves.”

My son can think of things or see things in a way that I just couldn't comprehend or hope to see on my own. It's people like him and others with unique views that have made huge impacts on the world and people like me, pretty normal - not so much.
 

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We have two Centralized Structured Classrooms on our elementary campus. Several of the students have been able to be mainstreamed, with support, so they no longer go to CSC. That is the ultimate hope/goal for all of the students.
Our district has several different levels of CSC. There are the students with severe autism, usually with some other mental disabilities, who will probably always require a high level of care.
Our group is learning how to learn. Potty training, eating, following directions, learning to speak. They will hopefully be able to read before they leave.
Another group is high functioning, but not ready to be in the regular classroom for long periods of time.

My job is to get them familar with some medical things - getting on a scale, blood pressures, taking temps, opening their mouths and checking their ears. One of my parents cried the first time they went to the doctor's office and her son stepped on the scale without prompting - they could rarely get him weighed before.
 
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