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Discussion Starter #81
He's always been keen to learn and work, but he's also a very thoughtful dog who likes to understand things before doing them. My previous dog was a bulldozer who took to agility like a duck to water; And he's the most amazing partner, always gives 100%. It's very impressive to see him at work.
These things you have said, are the most key to me. I will be working with accomplished trainers, who I feel will be able to work with me and my dog. I'm excited to learn! But, I think having that drive, that desire to work and please is so important in order to accomplish anything in competition world.
 

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Discussion Starter #82
I just want to respond to comments re field bred dogs all being high energy. I have found a wide range of disposition in any litter in terms of energy level, drive, interest in birds (for you hunt people!), and in other ways. So I would say find a breeder who you are confident will match you with what you want in terms of disposition. I think temperament testing is an important part of that - Google Volhardt Temperament Testing for more info re that. There are totally mellow family pets and master national hunt contenders in the same litter- I know that from experience.
I think this is such an important point! I have definitely had an in depth conversation with the breeder about my goals and what kind of dog I think I need/want, and what kind of dog she thinks I need for what I want. She does the Volhardt aptitude test and a modified Avi dog test. She also talked about the variability in temperament in her litters, and how she thinks its important that all of her dogs have an off-switch. Because at the end of the day, these are still our pets and we need to be able to live with them. Not have them bouncing off the walls after a 5-mile run wondering what's next?!
 

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Discussion Starter #83
This was my Barkley. 8/25/2007 - 5/26/2019 I am hoping to find another field golden as handsome, intelligent and with the same kind disposition.
He's wonderful! I wish you the same. However, I'm sure no matter what the temperament of your next dog, you will love them just the same :)
 

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Discussion Starter #84
Here is my boy Rio, he's coming up on 10 months old. The first photo is him at about 9-10 weeks old, the second was taken last week, and the third I think he was around 5-6 months old. He was stalking my friends dog trying to steal her bumper lol!
Wow! He really darkened up from the first photo, and is now the most deep, beautiful red. He looks like a fun boy! Who doesn't love a little mischievousness. Keeps things interesting!
 

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Thank you for your opinions. I knew this would come...just one clarification! Since the only 'field' event I run in, I know that in fact, a dog with good style, will get more passes, than a dog that has limited style. I agree that if the dog completes all elements in a 'test' he will pass, but as you get up to SH level and MH levels more subjectivity comes into play. I have experienced it on both sides....pass and no pass...Then we can talk about the Master Nationals....
Hi 3goldens2keep,
I totally missed your earlier post, and I can totally appreciate where you are coming with it. Our breeder also talked about how some field breeders go for this over the top energy. But, that is not actually what she breeds for, because as you said, it can be a bit too much, and it makes for a dog that is not so easy to live with... especially in the earlier, untrained days. That said they are still higher energy, but, have an off-switch, so they can settle at the end of the day. And given that this is our first field dog, and at the moment are not planning to compete in field (though I haven't ruled it out), I don't think we will be given the wildest pup out of the litter. I still expect that our field pup might be a bigger handful as compared to our first, just in terms of speed and intelligence. I'm glad that I have had the experience of raising one golden, because now I feel better prepared to take on a potentially more challenging one. Rundle is very submissive, biddable, over-sized (not fat), slower moving, and lacks that drive for work. She makes for a great therapy dog though! We will be taking this new pup to lots of training classes, working with certified trainers, and making sure the pup gets one-on-one time training separate from our current dog.

I think what fourlakes said is important. as well. That in any litter there will be variability in temperament and energy levels. And working with a good breeder will help to ensure that you get the best fit for your home given the environment, your time commitments and competition goals. I'm really confident that we selected an excellent breeder that has a good understanding of what we need/want, and will pick an amazing pup for us!

But, case and point if you are going to get a pup from a breeder that breeds working dogs, and ask for a competition dog, you should be prepared to get a pup that needs a job, and give it the time, energy and dedication it needs to live its best life!
 

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Discussion Starter #86
This is Gus. He is a field bred who is currently just a pet. He is high energy but is perfect when kept on routine which must include a long walk or run where he finds the largest stick he can to carry the whole time.
He was very easy to train and is very smart.
Love him! He's got a great Clint Eastwood look in that second pic, LOL! I think the most important thing is they have an outlet for their energy, and that doesn't necessarily have to be in the field or competition. And I actually think that is true of most dogs... who would want to spend every day trapped inside their house with nothing to do? Some just may need a bit longer of a walk/run than others. But, if you can provide that than you will have the best companion there is!
 

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Thank you for your opinions. I knew this would come...just one clarification! Since the only 'field' event I run in, I know that in fact, a dog with good style, will get more passes, than a dog that has limited style. I agree that if the dog completes all elements in a 'test' he will pass, but as you get up to SH level and MH levels more subjectivity comes into play. I have experienced it on both sides....pass and no pass...Then we can talk about the Master Nationals....
Definitely agree there!
 

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Hi 3goldens2keep,
I totally missed your earlier post, and I can totally appreciate where you are coming with it. Our breeder also talked about how some field breeders go for this over the top energy. But, that is not actually what she breeds for, because as you said, it can be a bit too much, and it makes for a dog that is not so easy to live with... especially in the earlier, untrained days. That said they are still higher energy, but, have an off-switch, so they can settle at the end of the day. And given that this is our first field dog, and at the moment are not planning to compete in field (though I haven't ruled it out), I don't think we will be given the wildest pup out of the litter. I still expect that our field pup might be a bigger handful as compared to our first, just in terms of speed and intelligence. I'm glad that I have had the experience of raising one golden, because now I feel better prepared to take on a potentially more challenging one. Rundle is very submissive, biddable, over-sized (not fat), slower moving, and lacks that drive for work. She makes for a great therapy dog though! We will be taking this new pup to lots of training classes, working with certified trainers, and making sure the pup gets one-on-one time training separate from our current dog.

I think what fourlakes said is important. as well. That in any litter there will be variability in temperament and energy levels. And working with a good breeder will help to ensure that you get the best fit for your home given the environment, your time commitments and competition goals. I'm really confident that we selected an excellent breeder that has a good understanding of what we need/want, and will pick an amazing pup for us!

But, case and point if you are going to get a pup from a breeder that breeds working dogs, and ask for a competition dog, you should be prepared to get a pup that needs a job, and give it the time, energy and dedication it needs to live its best life!
You show that you have a good idea what you want and how to get it.

Good Luck
 
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