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Jamie
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Here is my boy Rio, he's coming up on 10 months old. The first photo is him at about 9-10 weeks old, the second was taken last week, and the third I think he was around 5-6 months old. He was stalking my friends dog trying to steal her bumper lol!

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I want to share something that I always tell folks looking at field Goldens. Not all will agree with me, but I have found it to be true. One of the things that breeders try and bring into their field lines is a dog that is very high energy, sometimes almost over the top! We like this because in Hunt Tests and especially in Field Trials one of the traits that separates winners from the group is the 'style' that the dog displays when working on a field/ water hunt. These dogs will always run as fast as they can to go pick up a downed bird, then they will return it using the same speed. When these dogs run the way they run, it reminds me of a Greyhound running a race. It is that 'Style' that can separate a dog in competition or even in a Hunt Test.

So as an owner of a field dog, you must be prepared for this. If your dog has it he/she will do everything with this 'gusto' and they are more difficult to train. They are usually very 'Trainable' but it takes great consistency and patients...once they are trained they are wonderful pets, like most all Goldens. So be prepared for that and talk with your breeder about that.....
Now I am not saying that this does not occur in other Golden's that are not a 'field line', it does! But, if you truly find a field line, your odds of having one of these dogs is much greater....
 

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Jamie
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It is that 'Style' that can separate a dog in competition or even in a Hunt Test.

So as an owner of a field dog, you must be prepared for this. If your dog has it he/she will do everything with this 'gusto' and they are more difficult to train. They are usually very 'Trainable' but it takes great consistency and patients...once they are trained they are wonderful pets, like most all Goldens. So be prepared for that and talk with your breeder about that.....
Couple of problems with your post. First of all, hunt tests aren't competitions only field trials are. Therefore, there is no "separation" of dogs in a hunt test. Second, I disagree with your statement about field dogs being more difficult to train. They are high energy yes, but generally they love working and are therefore quite easy to train. I have a show dog and a field dog that I train in field work and my show boy runs with just has much gusto as my field dog. However, my show dog has been more difficult to train because he doesn't have the stamina that my field dog has. I think you will find several of us that had show dogs first that can confirm that our field dogs have been way easier to train.
 

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It depends on the dog to be honest, but i agree some of those traits are more common!

This is one my current girls she has a very high toy drive and does not let off like you mentioned, but she is the calmest golden I've ever owned.
Its a bit ironic, but everyone that knows me brings it up as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Here's Duster (field/performance) in action!
This is my dream! I want to do agility with my field girlie, so badly! I hope she loves it! Did Duster take to agility right away? I know some things take a bit more effort to learn. But, with my current dog, she was always more excited to leave the facility than to be there and train.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Here is Martin at 6 months enjoying a hike in the woods
Very cute! I am BIG into hiking! In the spring/summer/fall I spend as much time in the mountains as I can with my golden girl. One of the reasons why for my next pup, I want to know there is a good joint history behind her. So, we can hike all day without worry! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #70
It depends on the dog to be honest, but i agree some of those traits are more common!

This is one my current girls she has a very high toy drive and does not let off like you mentioned, but she is the calmest golden I've ever owned.
Its a bit ironic, but everyone that knows me brings it up as well.
Wow! She is a cutie! Sounds like the perfect dog :O) All the drive when you need it, yet, a great off-switch at the end of the day. The breeder I am contact with says she breeds for that kind of temperament as well. Fingers crossed!
 

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Here are my boys. Cooper is 8 and the field in his pedigree is several generations back on his moms side. Next is Sammy, half field, half conformation. Both are master hunters. Rudy is 21 months and is Sammys nephew. All 3 have wonderful drive and great temperaments.
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This is my dream! I want to do agility with my field girlie, so badly! I hope she loves it! Did Duster take to agility right away? I know some things take a bit more effort to learn. But, with my current dog, she was always more excited to leave the facility than to be there and train.
He's always been keen to learn and work, but he's also a very thoughtful dog who likes to understand things before doing them. He loved obedience work from the outset, but was more tentative with agility at first. My previous dog was a bulldozer who took to agility like a duck to water; Duster is kind of the polar opposite of her, in that he sees the world as a mosaic where all the pieces have to be in place for things to function properly. It took me a while to figure out how to deal with that in his agility training. Once I got my act together and adjusted my training to suit his learning style, he flourished. One of the things that was hard for me to grasp was that I needed to work on his confidence, not his speed: he needed to be fully confident in order to work at speed. It's been a very interesting learning experience for me too. He's made me a much better trainer. And he's the most amazing partner, always gives 100%. It's very impressive to see him at work.
 

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I just want to respond to comments re field bred dogs all being high energy. I have found a wide range of disposition in any litter in terms of energy level, drive, interest in birds (for you hunt people!), and in other ways. So I would say find a breeder who you are confident will match you with what you want in terms of disposition. I think temperament testing is an important part of that - Google Volhardt Temperament Testing for more info re that. There are totally mellow family pets and master national hunt contenders in the same litter- I know that from experience.
 

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Couple of problems with your post. First of all, hunt tests aren't competitions only field trials are. Therefore, there is no "separation" of dogs in a hunt test. Second, I disagree with your statement about field dogs being more difficult to train. They are high energy yes, but generally they love working and are therefore quite easy to train. I have a show dog and a field dog that I train in field work and my show boy runs with just has much gusto as my field dog. However, my show dog has been more difficult to train because he doesn't have the stamina that my field dog has. I think you will find several of us that had show dogs first that can confirm that our field dogs have been way easier to train.
Thank you for your opinions. I knew this would come...just one clarification! Since the only 'field' event I run in, I know that in fact, a dog with good style, will get more passes, than a dog that has limited style. I agree that if the dog completes all elements in a 'test' he will pass, but as you get up to SH level and MH levels more subjectivity comes into play. I have experienced it on both sides....pass and no pass...Then we can talk about the Master Nationals....
 

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This is Gus. He is a field bred who is currently just a pet. He is high energy but is perfect when kept on routine which must include a long walk or run where he finds the largest stick he can to carry the whole time.
He was very easy to train and is very smart. View attachment 869854
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A fine looking (red) Golden he is! Thanks for sharing...
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Here are my boys. Cooper is 8 and the field in his pedigree is several generations back on his moms side. Next is Sammy, half field, half conformation. Both are master hunters. Rudy is 21 months and is Sammys nephew. All 3 have wonderful drive and great temperaments.
Wow! What an awesome group of boys you have! So accomplished and beautiful!
 
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