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Most performance bred dogs are great pets. Intelligence and great obedience training being a couple reasons.
No criticism meant, most suffix performance titles don't mean much.
That's actually a bit offensive that you would say that. Those of us who have titles work hard for them! These dogs perform in an environment full of other dogs and distractions. I have 1 dog getting ready to show at the utility level. I'm here to tell you, it's NOT easy! We are entered in a trial next month so we shall see how it goes!

Basics of what my dogs can do for the titles they've earned are pretty extensive. For the titles they haven't earned yet, it's even more extensive. Even the "pet" titles can be difficult at the upper levels.
 

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As someone who has a dog who’s 2 tomorrow and has completed RI title in the ring...I see both sides. But my girl‘s second leg almost didn’t happen in RI because some jerk sprayed a can of air outside the building while mine was pottying. They were trying to reset their dog and mine is scared to death of a can of air. So my dog and I were supposed to suffer because of someone else’s ignorance? Then the judge basically said after she stopped midway through because the door slammed, “Well I would never bring a female into the ring once they have a season because they become stupid and unfocused.” Seriously?? What a jerk.

As far as the video judged ones...almost everyone I’ve seen post scores are definitely being scored in the 80’s...so I think some are being judged lower than they would in a ring. May even discourage some folks for even trying it beyond this level. I’ll be interested to see how some trainers I know who have done virtual get scored.
 

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Most of the OTCH people I know do not bring the dogs out until they are 2-3 years old. And then they take the first year back to go from CD to UD. Then it takes another year to get the UDX.

OTCH can take another 2-3 years or more. Depends on the skill level of the area they are in.

Around here, you have the same people fighting over OTCH points, all with 198.5-200 scores.
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OTCH is a dream! And you're right. They train the dog all the way through before they put them in the ring. I don't do that. With Winx it was train a level, show. With Pilot, I was already training the next level as I was showing. UD is a completely new level for me, but at 3 years old I think he's just about ready. I probably know pretty much all the people you are talking about! There's a lot of great handlers here.
 

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Yes.... :(

AKC started with trick titles via video done at home and sent to testers. Which I thought was OK and kinda fun. It's not the same thing as competition obedience, so no comparison, so no problem.

I haven't read all of the specific rules on equipment, etc... but people are getting rally titles the same way. There is definitely an issue where you have people getting obedience titles doing isolated runs in informal settings that may be recognized by AKC the same way as obedience titles earned at trials with no cheating, etc...
I've evaluated Trick Dog titles. It kept me entertained and encouraged people to continue working with their dogs. They can only get Rally Novice titles that way.

TKE is difficult to earn. Even in a home environment. It was a lack of space for me and the dogs really do feed off the crowd!
 

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Kate
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I've evaluated Trick Dog titles. It kept me entertained and encouraged people to continue working with their dogs. They can only get Rally Novice titles that way.

TKE is difficult to earn. Even in a home environment. It was a lack of space for me and the dogs really do feed off the crowd!
I didn't mind the trick stuff, because to me it's not the same thing as obedience.

Rally novice - I know people who practice really hard at it. And I mean they faithfully meet up 2 times a week to run through courses. Typical scores may be upper 80's and 90's for most of these people - but considering it happens with them pulling themselves together and entering the ring while their knees might be knocking together in stage terror.... those are awesome scores.

A lot of people start out in rally with the intention of going into obedience.... but find that rally is hard enough for their nerves.

I remember this one guy who was the brother of somebody who got OTCH's on all her dogs. Somehow she got her brother pushed to at least do rally with his dogs? I remember sitting next to him at trials and seeing him physically shake from nerves. And he did not have parkinsons. It was all nerves.

Knowing what people went up against - nerves particularly - to get a very simple RN title on their dogs - and that's fighting those nerves and fears to title their dogs. That's why I'm irritated that AKC decided to give away vanity RN's like candy this year. Those people don't need to have their hard earned titles cheapened because now there's a bunch of people who have RN's who did not have to deal with the same nerves and stress that they did + didn't even leave home.

And rally doesn't need this either! Rally faces a lot of discrimination to begin with because many of us have seen the OTHER people at rally trials. The ones with the treat fingers, constantly clucking/begging/pleading with their dogs and subpar heeling, etc... getting titles left and right.
 

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To be exact though.... behind every title - and the more advanced, the difference between a dog being a great pet and a dog being a champion is the person training the dog.

In the hands of us plebeians - those suffix performance titles are a glimpse into what a dog is capable of, though he may not ever become an OTCH, MACH, or FC. They actually matter a bit because many are earned by dog owners who trained the dogs themselves - vs sending the dog out to professional trainers. Dog owners may have lesser honed skills and make more mistakes while raising and training the dogs. So if the dogs are titled in spite of all that, it's awesome. As well, my personal take especially with competition titles is.... it's time and love and attention that especially earned those titles.

Now virtual titles? That's something a little different and my take a lower level of accomplishment. I've not gone out to try to get a rally title or whatever on my dogs - because the most difficult part to getting a rally leg is showing up at a trial and spending the 10-20 minutes before you go into the ring memorizing and panicking over the course and exercises. Some judges are nice and have preprinted course maps for people to take back to their spots so they can review the exercises and double check the rules to make sure they don't lost 10 points for not doing an exercise correctly. Other judges tape a map to the wall and it's up to you and other trainers to cram together in that corner and either take pictures with your phone or memorize the map while you stand there. <= As well, the biggest test for a dog especially at an advanced level is that dog's ability to focus and work while in a strange place, with noise/people/dogs and other stuff distracting and stressing that dog out. I've not thoroughly examined the virtual stuff, but my impression has been it's kinda more of a vanity title without being earned at a trial with the difficulties mentioned above.
Yes! I do find Rally to be the easiest performance venue at the lower levels. FWIW....my dogs are 100% handled by me.
The only time someone else handles my dogs is when my granddaughter does her Junior Handler stuff. Pilot LOVES to work for her.
 

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I didn't mind the trick stuff, because to me it's not the same thing as obedience.

Rally novice - I know people who practice really hard at it. And I mean they faithfully meet up 2 times a week to run through courses. Typical scores may be upper 80's and 90's for most of these people - but considering it happens with them pulling themselves together and entering the ring while their knees might be knocking together in stage terror.... those are awesome scores.

A lot of people start out in rally with the intention of going into obedience.... but find that rally is hard enough for their nerves.

I remember this one guy who was the brother of somebody who got OTCH's on all her dogs. Somehow she got her brother pushed to at least do rally with his dogs? I remember sitting next to him at trials and seeing him physically shake from nerves. And he did not have parkinsons. It was all nerves.

Knowing what people went up against - nerves particularly - to get a very simple RN title on their dogs - and that's fighting those nerves and fears to title their dogs. That's why I'm irritated that AKC decided to give away vanity RN's like candy this year. Those people don't need to have their hard earned titles cheapened because now there's a bunch of people who have RN's who did not have to deal with the same nerves and stress that they did + didn't even leave home.

And rally doesn't need this either! Rally faces a lot of discrimination to begin with because many of us have seen the OTHER people at rally trials. The ones with the treat fingers, constantly clucking/begging/pleading with their dogs and subpar heeling, etc... getting titles left and right.
I know it's difficult for some people. I started in Obedience with a dog that was a great heeler but hated being touched. Maybe I got over the nerves there? For me, Rally Novice is one of my puppies' first ring experiences.
 

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Kate
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I know it's difficult for some people. I started in Obedience with a dog that was a great heeler but hated being touched. Maybe I got over the nerves there? For me, Rally Novice is one of my puppies' first ring experiences.
With us now having BN - that's the first ring experience for my guys and have not bothered with rally since.... :)

The thing I dislike about rally is I have big dogs. It's a little dog sport from the way the judges approach it. You can't open up and show off your dog's heeling. It's stop-go-stop-go the whole time. >.<
 

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After we've totally derailed your thread, let me address your original question.
I, personally, would not consider this a performance bred litter.
This is a beautifully balanced, obviously well thought out breeding with multiple strengths in the pedigree. It should result in puppies who are smart, trainable, but good to live with.
For comparison, here's a dog (just picked at random from K9data) from what I would consider a performance breeding:
That's too much dog for the average novice home, but not the type of breeding you are looking at.
Enjoy your puppy!
This has been a very interesting discussion! To get back to the OP's question, I agree with hotel4dogs about the pedigree.

My dog came from a breeder who produces performance dogs, mostly for competitive obedience and agility homes. His K9 Data pages is here: Pedigree: ATChC Tanbark's Leave 'Em In The Dust
He's obviously a fairly high-octane dog, which is what I wanted. He is also "one of those dogs" you hope to have in your lifetime but don't expect to get. I've never owned such a trainable dog before. He's incredibly intuitive and sometimes seems to know how to do complex stuff without being taught. In addition to agility, I do rally obedience classes with him, not because it's my thing, particularly, but because he's such a rewarding partner to train (we don't compete in rally, we only train). Not only does this dog need a job, but it would be tragic in some ways for a dog like this not to have one; he was clearly bred to work and he literally comes alive when I get the training bag out of the cupboard. I'm glad he was not my first dog, or even my first competition dog. I don't think I'd have been able to do him justice.
 

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Those of us who have titles work hard for them! These dogs perform in an environment full of other dogs and distractions. I have 1 dog getting ready to show at the utility level. I'm here to tell you, it's NOT easy!
I am aware of the level of difficulty and how much work it takes.
874692
 

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Going back to where the OP started the thread, I think this will be a nice breeding. One of the things you’ll find is the biddability of these pups. They will want to please you and want to be training with you. They will be happiest when ”working”. And that’s what you want, a dog that enjoys ”working”. If you can ask the breeder if there are cousins or related dogs in the pedigree in your area. It would be nice if you could meet them to get some idea of what the litter will be like.
 
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