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Hey everyone!
I'm looking into Woodecoy's 2021 litter. My husband and I are excited to get our first puppy together. We're generally active. We go on hikes on most weekends and go on daily walks. We have a backyard and are just 15 minutes from the beach where we'll run or walk. I wanted to get your thoughts on if our current level of activity is enough to keep a golden who comes from a performance line happy.

"Loki (Rio’s Woodecoy BrewN Mischief JH WC) will be bred to Willie (Woodecoy Carpe Diem SH RN CA CGC WCX). We are expecting this to be a fun and talented litter with a pedigree full of health tested dogs with great longevity. Pups should excel at hunting and performance events as well as being biddable and easy to live with companions."

Also, if anyone wants to double check these clearances to make sure everything looks good, I'd appreciate it! I'm new to the OFA world.


Thank you so much!
 

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Hi there! I want to answer your question about performance dogs as pets :) I cannot speak specifically for Goldens, but I can speak to other breeds considered "high drive" and particularly, working bred dogs within those breeds. Exercise is important, but I found within Border Collies that all the exercise in the world isn't going to be what a dog who wants to work needs: a job. Whether that is obedience, hunting, herding, rally, etc, these dogs can make amazing pets and active companions for a family that wants to do something with them. Not that you need to perform, or compete, but giving providing ample exercise and giving the dog a job can make a performance pet an amazing companion. I can say that I raised two Border Collies in an apartment, and while difficult, I spent a lot of time practicing disc, obedience (the female LOVED training, we clicker trained all sorts of commands), did some simple nose work stuff, etc.

I think what I'm getting at is that, yes, a performance bred dog needs exercise, but beyond that, they just need to be given a goal and a job. That job can be whatever you want it to be! Another thing I would add is structure. Goldens are a less sensitive breed, but dogs thrive on structure. All my dogs are crate trained, kept from letting themselves get into trouble (to the best of my abilities), etc.

Finally, I am not into field Goldens and as the owner of this kennel appears to be a veterinarian, I am a little wary of giving my input just because I am NOT a vet. However, the granddam of this prospective litter on the dam's side failed elbows. Was bred likely do to the idea that the failure was do to some sort of injury and the dog was not symptomatic nor did it affect work. Not that that is correct or right, but I've seen similar thoughts in the working dog breeding circles.
 

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I'm looking into Woodecoy's 2021 litter. My husband and I are excited to get our first puppy together. We're generally active. We go on hikes on most weekends and go on daily walks. We have a backyard and are just 15 minutes from the beach where we'll run or walk. I wanted to get your thoughts on if our current level of activity is enough to keep a golden who comes from a performance line happy.
I agree with Tagrenine that it's not just about exercise, it's about training and having a job. My dog is from performance lines: I got him to be my agility partner. We train once a week with a trainer and practise at least a couple of times a week in addition to that, and I also do a weekly rally-obedience class with him, partly because he loves it and partly because it gives us an extra training activity. From an energy standpoint he can run forever; no amount of physical exercise is going to tire him out. But an hour of obedience class, or agility drills, or learning new commands, will tire out his brain and he's a lot quieter and calmer in the house. If we miss training - and we missed nearly three months of it during the COVID lockdown - he's a bit harder to live with, whether or not he gets physical exercise. For example, I would eat my lunch outside in the garden, and he'd be running around pulling up tufts of turf from the lawn and tossing them in the air, just because he could. He's always really excited when he sees me packing the car with our agility stuff to go to a trial, and while he's a goof outside the ring, rolling on the ground, begging treats from everyone, etc., the instant we enter the ring he's all business and 100% focused on his job.

The best person to ask this question is your breeder. There's always a range of temperaments among puppies in a litter, and the breeder should be able to match you with a pup who will be happy with your lifestyle.
 

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Great insight! Thank you both! I’ve asked the same question to the breeder and looking to get on a call with them to discuss further as well but wanted to get a pulse check from others before having that conversation. Appreciate it thanks!
 

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Kristy
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Just wanted to say you've found a lovely breeding, I am drooling over the dogs in this pedigree. Tagrenine makes a good point, I normally do not give a second chance to anyone taking risks with elbow clearances, but the people involved with this would make me go ahead and ask questions about if it was a known or suspected injury, are all the other dogs in the family strong on elbows (no undocumented elbow issues) ? It's a conversation you might approach with the attitude that you want to learn and ask the breeder to talk to you about how the decision was made to go forward. It should be one of those things that if you're respectful she should be willing to discuss and have some answers on how she made all the decisions. The performance dogs breeders have to have dogs who will stand up to the work and field work is hard on a dog's body. They want to produce puppies who will hold up.

I am going to say that you and your husband need to be very honest with yourselves and each other about the role you want this dog to fill in your lives. Golden puppies in general take a good 2-3 year commitment of training and exercise most days of the week to make good family pets. Then they still need exercise and engagement. Tagrenine's comments about 'needing a job' is spot on with a dog like the puppies from this litter will be. They aren't going to stay home and sleep 10 hours while you're at work and running errands and then come home and sleep under the table while you cook and clean up and then let you watch netflix and drink a glass of wine till bedtime with just a game of fetch or a quick walk. It will be like having a toddler who needs monitoring and attention and will need to be engaged. It can be exhausting. The good thing is, unlike a toddler, you can crate a dog and go out to dinner but when you get home you'll pay for it ;)

This means that the dog takes precedence over training for a half marathon, working out at the gym instead of coming straight home, etc. I always worry when people say they're active, because it's only a good fit for the dog if you're willing to make the dog part of all the activities. Sometimes that is easy and sometimes it's not. If you all are both willing to make the dog a priority for years and not just months, I'd say go for it. (Seriously, this is a really awesome pedigree. This should be a puppy who wants to do things with you. I hope you might consider looking into hunt test training or some kind of sport like tracking - if you'll put the time and effort in, this will be a dog who will make you think you're a good dog trainer :) )
 

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Pardon my high jacking the thread, is there a site that decodes the title abbreviations?
Those appear to be 2 incredible dogs.
 

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Most performance bred dogs are great pets. Intelligence and great obedience training being a couple reasons.
No criticism meant, most suffix performance titles don't mean much.
 

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Puddles
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I think anyone that has a JH, SH, MH, WC or WCX would disagree that the suffix titles don't mean much. Getting to an OTCH or MACH need those suffix titles to achieve them. Regardless of a person's venue of choice it's always important to be involved in your dog's training and proud of their accomplishments. Dock diving, fast cat, barn hunts, herding or any activity should always be encouraged. It's part of enjoying and appreciating the qualities of your pups.
 

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Kate
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Most performance bred dogs are great pets. Intelligence and great obedience training being a couple reasons.
No criticism meant, most suffix performance titles don't mean much.
To be exact though.... behind every title - and the more advanced, the difference between a dog being a great pet and a dog being a champion is the person training the dog.

In the hands of us plebeians - those suffix performance titles are a glimpse into what a dog is capable of, though he may not ever become an OTCH, MACH, or FC. They actually matter a bit because many are earned by dog owners who trained the dogs themselves - vs sending the dog out to professional trainers. Dog owners may have lesser honed skills and make more mistakes while raising and training the dogs. So if the dogs are titled in spite of all that, it's awesome. As well, my personal take especially with competition titles is.... it's time and love and attention that especially earned those titles.

Now virtual titles? That's something a little different and my take a lower level of accomplishment. I've not gone out to try to get a rally title or whatever on my dogs - because the most difficult part to getting a rally leg is showing up at a trial and spending the 10-20 minutes before you go into the ring memorizing and panicking over the course and exercises. Some judges are nice and have preprinted course maps for people to take back to their spots so they can review the exercises and double check the rules to make sure they don't lost 10 points for not doing an exercise correctly. Other judges tape a map to the wall and it's up to you and other trainers to cram together in that corner and either take pictures with your phone or memorize the map while you stand there. <= As well, the biggest test for a dog especially at an advanced level is that dog's ability to focus and work while in a strange place, with noise/people/dogs and other stuff distracting and stressing that dog out. I've not thoroughly examined the virtual stuff, but my impression has been it's kinda more of a vanity title without being earned at a trial with the difficulties mentioned above.
 

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Kate
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Is that really a thing?
Yes.... :(

AKC started with trick titles via video done at home and sent to testers. Which I thought was OK and kinda fun. It's not the same thing as competition obedience, so no comparison, so no problem.

I haven't read all of the specific rules on equipment, etc... but people are getting rally titles the same way. There is definitely an issue where you have people getting obedience titles doing isolated runs in informal settings that may be recognized by AKC the same way as obedience titles earned at trials with no cheating, etc...
 

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Yes.... :(

AKC started with trick titles via video done at home and sent to testers.

And I haven't read all of the specific rules on equipment, etc... but people are getting rally titles the same way.
Pathetic
 

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Puddles
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Just curious, why do you see this as pathetic... that's a pretty harsh perspective. And anything but encouraging to anyone new to dogs or dog sports searching on how to get involved. Especially when there are no classes available.

I totally agree with Megora that doing a video in your own space is in no way the same level as competing in front of a crowd of people, a judge and all the noise of a venue. But it has people out there learning how to train their dogs. It encourages people to get excited about training and spending time with their dogs. Currently there are no shows yet people and the AKC are finding a way to increase the awareness of dog sports. How is this pathetic?
Everyone that has worked a year or 2 earning a UDX or an OTCH had to start somewhere. Every title starts with a beginner level and a desire to get involved and increase your training knowledge and the dogs skills.
 

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No criticism meant, most suffix performance titles don't mean much.
I respectfully disagree. It means the person has spent time with their dog, learning and training towards a goal, and accomplishing it. It shows the person cares enough to start at the beginning. Not everyone will every have a prefix titled dog. It doesn't mean those suffix titles mean nothing.
 
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