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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Do you have access to a balcony where you can set up a potty station (think fake grass on a platform over a grate with a puppy pad underneath to catch the urine and can be easily changed/cleaned up) or a walk-in shower you are comfortable training her to use as a wee station? I ask because we were literally only a 20 minute potty timer until Molly was like 5 or 6 months old. If she wasn't peeing at 20 minutes we put her in the crate and tried again in 5 minutes. Which might not be feasible when you are in a high rise (thinking the sheer time to go from timer goes off, get puppy leashed, walk to elevator/stairs, go downstairs, find a suitable potty space, come back home).

I had pretty much the EASIEST set up (single story home with a fenced backyard) and I was overwhelmed with EVERY SINGLE ONE OF MY PUPPIES. It's a huge transition to go from "no puppy" to "ahh puppy!" but it does get better. Every day you have a wealth of interactions to help train both of you to make your lives easier.



My partner has the same complaint. Molly will do things for me that he just can't get from her (mainly I get to be lazy and stand at the door watching them and they will come back to the door vs me having to go get them and Molly fetches for me and won't for him... BUT he gets calm Molly. She'll stand next to him and just be chill and get pets. But she wants to be laying on top of me checking a bone in my face or chewing on my arm or pulling my hair, etc) I think it boils down to what your puppy sees you as. I'm the fun one who plays with her all the time but I also don't put up with her ****. She doesn't want to come inside? Ok. I will hunt you down and leash you and we will do the walk of shame back to the house. Every single time she comes in when called... she gets rewarded. Go figure she likes coming when I call. Same with fetch. She gets the ball I throw a party cause she brought it back (vs playing chase me). Now she loves brining me things (can't stop, she even gets bottles off tables to bring them to me... she counter surfed a hot sauce packet off the kitchen counter and then brought it to me). Puppies are silly riots. You just gotta know what you want her to do and then reward what you want and discourage/redirect what you don't.
How to fix the incorrect sitting posture?
882535
 

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how do you make the puppy stay on the pee mat till she pees? Should we put a fence around the pee mat so she does her business ans doesn’t walk away?
Usually I do this on leash. Just keep bringing them back to the spot and as soon as they squat or pee on the spot I throw a party. Like happy voice, lots of praise, treats, rubs, etc. Good job! And rinse and repeat every time you go to that spot. I usually also couple this with the phrase "go potty" b/c they will EVENTUALLY associate that with peeing and it's handy when out and about and needing them to hurry it up.
How to fix the incorrect sitting posture?
Lazy sits is pretty common in puppies. Especially when their bodies are in awkward stages. I don't usually correct it unless we're doing formal work (i.e. training for rally/obedience). If you think the lazy sit is a direct result of poor muscle tone or something there are exercises out there to help strengthen that muscle group but again I think it's just a puppy being a puppy.
 

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Thanks we have seen this one but haven’t bought yet. Will consider this. Thanks

how do you make the puppy stay on the pee mat till she pees? Should we put a fence around the pee mat so she does her business ans doesn’t walk away?
We use a little tray of fake grass too. We initially had the grass on a balcony and would leash her up, and stay around it until she went, but she hated it and would go as far as holding her pee in for 6 hours. What wound up working was setting up a small cube pen inside with just the fake grass in it, and not much other space. We'd then carry her and place her on the grass to go potty. We watched her like a hawk and she had a couple of accidents that were totally our fault not catching the signs. After about 4 days of doing this, we opened up the pen slightly so she can go in and out on her own, and she's now generally good about just walking herself onto the grass to potty. She does still love laying down on the grass now and then!

Also she's been better about not eating her poop. We've been cramming a very tasty treat in her mouth immediately after she goes which seems to help as she now looks at us for a treat instead of at her poop 😂
 

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The key is repetition... you might have to lead her to a pee pad to potty train her hundreds of times... and even then after a couple of months, she might go on the floor. She is a baby, and is just learning.

It would be a bit easy if you do not have any other responsibilities... but if you have a full time job, it gets harder. Like any other baby, she does not know she is being adamant or lazy or anything. She is just being her, so you really need to have tons of patience to train her how you want her to behave. And in my experience, goldens retain their training better than humans :)

Also do not mind the negative posts here, from what I have seen there is a tendency to blame the owner instead of providing suggestions. Some of these would be from breeders who raise goldens for a living - its like asking a long haul trucker tips on navigating rush hour traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
The key is repetition... you might have to lead her to a pee pad to potty train her hundreds of times... and even then after a couple of months, she might go on the floor. She is a baby, and is just learning.

It would be a bit easy if you do not have any other responsibilities... but if you have a full time job, it gets harder. Like any other baby, she does not know she is being adamant or lazy or anything. She is just being her, so you really need to have tons of patience to train her how you want her to behave. And in my experience, goldens retain their training better than humans :)

Also do not mind the negative posts here, from what I have seen there is a tendency to blame the owner instead of providing suggestions. Some of these would be from breeders who raise goldens for a living - its like asking a long haul trucker tips on navigating rush hour traffic.
Thanks a lot and you are very nice. Have a good day.
 

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Hazel is 4 months old, we got her home a month ago to say she has been a lot of will be an understatement. I’m not sure if these are normal behaviour of something to be concerned:

1. she eats her poop. We will in an appartment and we will keep her in her pen and watch her like a hawk to remove her poop tray as soon as she does her business. We have now started taking her for a walk. Usually it’s 4 poops in a day at 6:15, 10, 5 and 9:30. Yesterday she pooped earlier at 8 and ate it ☹
2. After we have allowed her to freely move out of her pen she is peeing everywhere. Sometimes even the couch. We did this because earlier when we restricted her to pen we would keep her pee mat inside her pen and she will land up sleeping on her pee mat.
3. She is adamant and while walking will sit down on her own will and then lie down and won’t move for few minutes. I wonder if she is lazy or adamant. I have to lure treats and sometime even that doesn’t work. I’m not surely entirely if she is lazy cause back home she will have spurts of energy when she is running around in small apartment doing crazy stuff. I mean I was out with her minutes ago on walks and she was lazy on the walk.
4. She gets super excited seeing other dogs and will pull on leash to play with them and it will usually end up with the other dogs growling at her annoyed with her excitement.
5. She likes playing and licking strangers and the moment she sees anyone walking past she will pull leash to go and get petted by them and lick them.
6. Lastly biting issues, I just can’t pet her. The moment I will try to let she will try to grab my hand and bite it. Even with kids at home if they are hanging their legs she wants to bite them.


All these issues are overwhelming me and spoiling my relationship with her as I’m getting irritated and have less patience compared to my wife and sometimes I land up scolding her.
I don’t know which issues to prioritise but it’s not working. I have a trainer who charges me $100 per hour and have 3 sessions and hasn’t worked. I don’t know how to solve these. I don’t know if she is adamant, dumb, lazy or has health issues.
I wonder if someone can help.
Regards
VC
All common issues for a Golden. All common issues which can be remedied by going to the vet or Googling. Remember, there is nothing wrong with the dog; there is something wrong with the owner. Bottom line, you have to love your dog with all your heart so issues like these do not "irritate" you. It does not seem that is the case. Maybe, for the little pup's happiness, you need to find her a loving home.
 

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Hazel is 4 months old, we got her home a month ago to say she has been a lot of will be an understatement. I’m not sure if these are normal behaviour of something to be concerned:

1. she eats her poop. We will in an appartment and we will keep her in her pen and watch her like a hawk to remove her poop tray as soon as she does her business. We have now started taking her for a walk. Usually it’s 4 poops in a day at 6:15, 10, 5 and 9:30. Yesterday she pooped earlier at 8 and ate it ☹
2. After we have allowed her to freely move out of her pen she is peeing everywhere. Sometimes even the couch. We did this because earlier when we restricted her to pen we would keep her pee mat inside her pen and she will land up sleeping on her pee mat.
3. She is adamant and while walking will sit down on her own will and then lie down and won’t move for few minutes. I wonder if she is lazy or adamant. I have to lure treats and sometime even that doesn’t work. I’m not surely entirely if she is lazy cause back home she will have spurts of energy when she is running around in small apartment doing crazy stuff. I mean I was out with her minutes ago on walks and she was lazy on the walk.
4. She gets super excited seeing other dogs and will pull on leash to play with them and it will usually end up with the other dogs growling at her annoyed with her excitement.
5. She likes playing and licking strangers and the moment she sees anyone walking past she will pull leash to go and get petted by them and lick them.
6. Lastly biting issues, I just can’t pet her. The moment I will try to let she will try to grab my hand and bite it. Even with kids at home if they are hanging their legs she wants to bite them.


All these issues are overwhelming me and spoiling my relationship with her as I’m getting irritated and have less patience compared to my wife and sometimes I land up scolding her.
I don’t know which issues to prioritise but it’s not working. I have a trainer who charges me $100 per hour and have 3 sessions and hasn’t worked. I don’t know how to solve these. I don’t know if she is adamant, dumb, lazy or has health issues.
I wonder if someone can help.
Regards
VC
Hello,

I am empathetic to the puppy and the family. I can understand the frustration and challenge you have been going through. I am someone who was fearful of dogs and now have 4+ months golden puppy. I will share my experience here, hope that helps.

1. A puppy if hungry, can never be trained. His biting /nipping habits could be a result of not getting enough food as well. Imagine we are in a classroom training but hungry enough that cannot focus. You as an owner will realize if he/she is getting enough food.
2. Puppy training is patience and patience and patience, I had the least in the family, our daughter who is in elementary school had the most. I have come along a long way in last 2.5 months to teach myself patience on handling dogs and managing them.
3. Puppy do not understand scolding, loud voice is music to their ears. Having calm and composed but strong message passing helps. Hand indication and key words associated with it works wonder. Saying "This is absolutely wrong thing you did" confused our pup. He just does not understand human language.
4. Puppy tied to a leash to you or under direct supervision helps. We used to take him out every 30 mins when the temperature outside was very well below freezing points and middle of 4 ft snow storm. It is challenging in an apartment but use pea pads . We never used pea pads.
5. Close to 5 months, our puppy is not fully house trained but very rare accidents occur. At times if he cannot hold, he will pee a few drop and hold rest to go out.
6. Have a neighbor with 3 extremely well behaved dogs, he said one of them peed all over the place till 1 yr. So there is no rule that fits all.
7. Every time he does it inside, show frustration and dislike by saying Ah, no, not again but not loudly. I made this mistake many times initially before realizing it does not help. No screaming , no loud voice helps - not with our puppy. But showing displeasure does.
8. every time she nips/tries to bite say Ouch loud, step aside, turn your back. Keep repeating till she understands this is not a playful attitude and will not be entertained.
9. Poop if contains undigested food, puppy may eat. I have read this but never happened . Is she hungry, if she is well fed why will she eat poop or do you notice that she has undigested food in the poop?
10. When you take her for walk, if possible go more than one family member together. It helps to understand the whole pack is doing what she should follow. In extreme cold, we all took him out for walk and he did reasonably well.
11. Last but not least, dog training starts with us, it is we who needs to be trained that in turn trains the dog. Two books helped us understand dog behavior, one that I did not complete but first few chapters are enough to teach me I was wrong every single time. Book - "The other end of the leash: why we do what we do around dogs has been of great help."

Good luck and would love to hear how things change positively.
 

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I think her eating issues will stop. Mine did that when she was a puppy. Has not in a long while. She is now two. My Golden has tons of energy when she sees another dog & wants to play. Otherwise great inside. I remember with my prior Goldens energy levels vary they ultimately calm down. I have Sara in a pretty good routine now so personal habit accidents are rare. It gets better with time. Give her a chance. I live in a condominium. Golden Retrievers are very intelligent dogs and want to please
 

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I just want to say hang in there! You’re going to be ok, pay attention to the suggestions that are nice and ditch the judgements. Parents learn by doing, that’s just how it goes. I definitely agree with the biting suggestion, saying OUCH over and over worked for us, and sometimes a little whine to imitate littermates. We would also replace our finger/toe/whatever with a baby Kong so she’d understand she could teethe or chew on certain things.
The potty issues, hang in there. Take the good suggestions and just know ours had accidents until around 6 months, I think it’s just a part of growing and puppy-hood. Whenever ours had a growth spurt she’d sometimes lose a little ability to know she had to go. I am also a first time owner and some have said I’m the problem, all we can do is keep trying! You got this!
 

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I personally have to agree with all the replies and advice given. As well, can see the downside of trying to train one in a high rise as well. Having raised only 2 of them ( I know members here have raised many more). With both of mine, the very FIRST thing I did before their first time inside of the house was to carry them to the back yard and SHOW them where their “ potty “ area was and then praised them when they did. Only then we’re they brought inside of the house to “explore” while being watched. Yes a occasional accident would occur where in a reinforced voice would be used. Then they would be put outside to reinforce where they were supposed to go. As far as biting, very typical for ANY puppy of any breed. Scold them and insure there are PLENTY of chew toys especially when their teething. I know you were handed the truth by one of the original reply’s but I have to agree with them. It’s not the puppy, but the training techniques as well as the high rise that compounds the problem. Trust me, you don’t want these issues when your golden is 70-80 pounds!....David
 

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Hazel is 4 months old, we got her home a month ago to say she has been a lot of will be an understatement. I’m not sure if these are normal behaviour of something to be concerned:

1. she eats her poop. We will in an appartment and we will keep her in her pen and watch her like a hawk to remove her poop tray as soon as she does her business. We have now started taking her for a walk. Usually it’s 4 poops in a day at 6:15, 10, 5 and 9:30. Yesterday she pooped earlier at 8 and ate it ☹
2. After we have allowed her to freely move out of her pen she is peeing everywhere. Sometimes even the couch. We did this because earlier when we restricted her to pen we would keep her pee mat inside her pen and she will land up sleeping on her pee mat.
3. She is adamant and while walking will sit down on her own will and then lie down and won’t move for few minutes. I wonder if she is lazy or adamant. I have to lure treats and sometime even that doesn’t work. I’m not surely entirely if she is lazy cause back home she will have spurts of energy when she is running around in small apartment doing crazy stuff. I mean I was out with her minutes ago on walks and she was lazy on the walk.
4. She gets super excited seeing other dogs and will pull on leash to play with them and it will usually end up with the other dogs growling at her annoyed with her excitement.
5. She likes playing and licking strangers and the moment she sees anyone walking past she will pull leash to go and get petted by them and lick them.
6. Lastly biting issues, I just can’t pet her. The moment I will try to let she will try to grab my hand and bite it. Even with kids at home if they are hanging their legs she wants to bite them.


All these issues are overwhelming me and spoiling my relationship with her as I’m getting irritated and have less patience compared to my wife and sometimes I land up scolding her.
I don’t know which issues to prioritise but it’s not working. I have a trainer who charges me $100 per hour and have 3 sessions and hasn’t worked. I don’t know how to solve these. I don’t know if she is adamant, dumb, lazy or has health issues.
I wonder if someone can help.
Regards
VC
Get a cat, and give the puppy to someone that understands dogs.
 

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Hazel is 4 months old, we got her home a month ago to say she has been a lot of will be an understatement. I’m not sure if these are normal behaviour of something to be concerned:

1. she eats her poop. We will in an appartment and we will keep her in her pen and watch her like a hawk to remove her poop tray as soon as she does her business. We have now started taking her for a walk. Usually it’s 4 poops in a day at 6:15, 10, 5 and 9:30. Yesterday she pooped earlier at 8 and ate it ☹
2. After we have allowed her to freely move out of her pen she is peeing everywhere. Sometimes even the couch. We did this because earlier when we restricted her to pen we would keep her pee mat inside her pen and she will land up sleeping on her pee mat.
3. She is adamant and while walking will sit down on her own will and then lie down and won’t move for few minutes. I wonder if she is lazy or adamant. I have to lure treats and sometime even that doesn’t work. I’m not surely entirely if she is lazy cause back home she will have spurts of energy when she is running around in small apartment doing crazy stuff. I mean I was out with her minutes ago on walks and she was lazy on the walk.
4. She gets super excited seeing other dogs and will pull on leash to play with them and it will usually end up with the other dogs growling at her annoyed with her excitement.
5. She likes playing and licking strangers and the moment she sees anyone walking past she will pull leash to go and get petted by them and lick them.
6. Lastly biting issues, I just can’t pet her. The moment I will try to let she will try to grab my hand and bite it. Even with kids at home if they are hanging their legs she wants to bite them.


All these issues are overwhelming me and spoiling my relationship with her as I’m getting irritated and have less patience compared to my wife and sometimes I land up scolding her.
I don’t know which issues to prioritise but it’s not working. I have a trainer who charges me $100 per hour and have 3 sessions and hasn’t worked. I don’t know how to solve these. I don’t know if she is adamant, dumb, lazy or has health issues.
I wonder if someone can help.
Regards
VC
Dear VC,
You said you always wanted a Golden, so congratulations! They are the best dogs in the whole world for many reasons, that you will discover. We love our Rosie as you will love your Hazel. But at 4 months, I didn't enjoy it too much. We have family members who raised Labrador retrievers - Goldens are like them in a lot of ways - so I knew it was going to be a long 2 years of puppyhood. But, when Rosie turned 1 year and 2 months, something happened, she turned the corner and life has been easier. She stopped biting as much (finally). So, it didn't take 2 years but I was prepared for that.

At 4 months, she's still sooooo little. Like a baby. Be patient, be kind, be loving, and take the long view. They only live about 10 years. By the time she is 3, ,she will be an adult and all this puppy drama will be a long, distant memory.

Goldens are everything that you read about: high energy (although 4 months is so little and they get tired fast!) Goldens also get hot easily - they will pass out or stop walking or playing if they get too hot. If Hong Kong, is hot like Houston be careful in the heat.

I read all the other replies, so I'm not going to tell you to bring the puppy back, or other advice. But, I will tell you this one thing, that I remind my husband all the time. Goldens are very sensitive and emotional. If you scold her, she may just shut down, freeze, not listen. My husband is a behavioral psychologist with a PhD in clinical psychology and he STILL sometimes fusses at Rosie and yells at her (though a lot less now :) You will not get what you want with a Golden unless you work positively. They want your love and attention and approval. Tell her what you WANT her to do - don't just say NO.

Okay, one more piece of advice, get your kids involved in training if they are old enough. They can teach her to "leave it" "good chew" "sit" - My breeder said teaching them "good chew" and giving them a toy, bone, etc can help. Teach "bad chew" with a sad face (not angry). Himalayan bones or Yak chews helped us the first year a lot. Bones, toys, whatever, if you can spend the money (the first year will be the most expensive). We had two baskets of toys, toys, balls, balls, chew toys. Oh, also - bubbles! The kids loved blowing bubbles and she chased them forever. I even did it in my garage if we couldn't go outside.

Good luck! Hope you are doing well in Hong Kong.
 

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None of that is unusual for a Golden puppy.

I'm going to sound harsh, but you deserve it. The problem is not the puppy, it's you. You have three problems: 1. the way you're raising your puppy; 2. your expectations; and 3. your lack of knowledge. In fact, it sounds like you're giving that puppy a pretty terrible life, so far.

Some dogs eat their poop. Could be the food you feed, the amount, some psychological or emotional issue, or something else.

At four months old, your puppy should be pretty much housebroken. You're not doing it right, AT ALL. You're going to need to look up the techniques and go back to square one and start over.

She sits or lies down on walks because she doesn't want to do something and you haven't trained her well. No puppy is "lazy." Or "adamant" or "dumb." And it doesn't sound like she has heath issues. You're not understanding her, and you don't know how to get what you want out of her. She is communicating with you, and you're not understanding it, and you're not communicating effectively with her. You are the human. She's just a little puppy. You have to do better. Much, much, better.

Of course she wants to run and see other dogs and people! She's a Golden Retriever puppy, that's the most exciting thing in the world, particularly since you confine her so severely. And all Golden puppies are mouthy and want to "bite" you. They play by biting. They experience their new world and learn all about it by putting everything in their mouths. This is extremely normal. You need to learn what to do with it, because it's going to be around for quite a long time, and if you don't deal with it right, it could be forever.

I don't know what you're paying that trainer for. The trainer is not telling you what you need to hear. And you've had three sessions and are upset that they haven't "worked"??? What did you expect from three one-hour sessions? Puppies are not iPhones. They are not "plug and play." They don't come pre-trained. They are little BABIES of another species, thrust into this strange world of human beings, where all their natural instincts about what they should do are wrong. And you're not helping her.

The difference between an adventure and an ordeal is your ATTITUDE. You are going about this every wrong way. Your expectations of the puppy are wrong. The way you're raising her is wrong. The way you're training her is wrong. You're doing everything wrong, and all she's doing is being a perfectly normal puppy.

Where do you live? There is a Vaibhav Chadha in Hong Kong, one in the U.S., several in India. Your profile doesn't say where you live. You need a good resource. Your trainer obviously isn't helping. And you need a lot of help. Tell us where you live, and maybe someone here can find you some assistance.

Meanwhile, I haven't offered solutions because you first need to become aware that you are the problem and your puppy is just fine. Once you readjust your attitude, people here will have great suggestions for you. Meanwhile, please get your head right. The puppy is just a normal puppy. Your approach is the problem, and a change will be your solution. You can't rely on a trainer, except to help guide you. You're going to have to do it yourself.

So take a big breath, relax, and people here will start to offer suggestions. I'll be back with some, too. Meanwhile, we could use more information.
With due respect, this person is reaching out for help in a time of frustration. They are at a loss regarding how to best address their situation. We have all been there with our dogs at some point or another—seasoned owners may not remember those days so well, but newer owners surely do.

As a breeder, your are seemingly an expert on this topic. Rather than sharing your expertise and providing constructive feedback, you chastise the questioner for their lack of knowledge. Should they have done more research before getting the puppy? Most certainly. But they are now at a place where they need assistance, instead of saying “to hell with it” and ridding the dog to another potentially unfit home, they reached out for help. Only to be met with a snarky and unhelpful response.

This is not what the golden retriever community does. We should be supporting fellow dog owners and sharing resources.

Maybe you are just having a bad day and this is one more story about a dog being failed that tipped you over the edge. But surely we can do better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
With due respect, this person is reaching out for help in a time of frustration. They are at a loss regarding how to best address their situation. We have all been there with our dogs at some point or another—seasoned owners may not remember those days so well, but newer owners surely do.

As a breeder, your are seemingly an expert on this topic. Rather than sharing your expertise and providing constructive feedback, you chastise the questioner for their lack of knowledge. Should they have done more research before getting the puppy? Most certainly. But they are now at a place where they need assistance, instead of saying “to hell with it” and ridding the dog to another potentially unfit home, they reached out for help. Only to be met with a snarky and unhelpful response.

This is not what the golden retriever community does. We should be supporting fellow dog owners and sharing resources.

Maybe you are just having a bad day and this is one more story about a dog being failed that tipped you over the edge. But surely we can do better.
Thanks for your support. My wife was upset why I turned to this forum as most people were not helpful and trolling. I’m glad few understand and are helpful. The good news is that biting problem has reduced and we are hopeful that toilet training will also be sorted soon. Thanks for your message.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Dear VC,
You said you always wanted a Golden, so congratulations! They are the best dogs in the whole world for many reasons, that you will discover. We love our Rosie as you will love your Hazel. But at 4 months, I didn't enjoy it too much. We have family members who raised Labrador retrievers - Goldens are like them in a lot of ways - so I knew it was going to be a long 2 years of puppyhood. But, when Rosie turned 1 year and 2 months, something happened, she turned the corner and life has been easier. She stopped biting as much (finally). So, it didn't take 2 years but I was prepared for that.

At 4 months, she's still sooooo little. Like a baby. Be patient, be kind, be loving, and take the long view. They only live about 10 years. By the time she is 3, ,she will be an adult and all this puppy drama will be a long, distant memory.

Goldens are everything that you read about: high energy (although 4 months is so little and they get tired fast!) Goldens also get hot easily - they will pass out or stop walking or playing if they get too hot. If Hong Kong, is hot like Houston be careful in the heat.

I read all the other replies, so I'm not going to tell you to bring the puppy back, or other advice. But, I will tell you this one thing, that I remind my husband all the time. Goldens are very sensitive and emotional. If you scold her, she may just shut down, freeze, not listen. My husband is a behavioral psychologist with a PhD in clinical psychology and he STILL sometimes fusses at Rosie and yells at her (though a lot less now :) You will not get what you want with a Golden unless you work positively. They want your love and attention and approval. Tell her what you WANT her to do - don't just say NO.

Okay, one more piece of advice, get your kids involved in training if they are old enough. They can teach her to "leave it" "good chew" "sit" - My breeder said teaching them "good chew" and giving them a toy, bone, etc can help. Teach "bad chew" with a sad face (not angry). Himalayan bones or Yak chews helped us the first year a lot. Bones, toys, whatever, if you can spend the money (the first year will be the most expensive). We had two baskets of toys, toys, balls, balls, chew toys. Oh, also - bubbles! The kids loved blowing bubbles and she chased them forever. I even did it in my garage if we couldn't go outside.

Good luck! Hope you are doing well in Hong Kong.
Thanks for your message. We really love Hazel and always love her. We can’t imagine giving her away. Hazel has changed a lot since I posted on this forum. Positive reinforcement has helped and her biting problem has reduced considerably. The main problem we need to still to solve for is the peeing problem. She even pees in her bed. We thought dogs don’t pee in their bed but she doesn’t mind. Thanks for the lovely suggestions
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Hi all thanks for all your inputs. Hazel has made improvements over the last 1 week thanks for all the inputs from the forum. She does all her poops outside the house now at fixed time periods and her biting habits have also reduced. I also notice a nice bond building between us and she always licks me instead of biting. Occasionally she will bite our younger one but I think that’s her way of playing.

The main unresolved issue now is peeing everywhere in the house. We take her to pee on the pee mat every few hours but despite that we have a few accidents in the day and she still pees in her bed on daily basis. We have fences the living room to save the couch and carpets to reduce our work. We thought dogs don’t pee in their bed but this one doesn’t mind.
Thanks for all the inputs everyone.
 

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The main unresolved issue now is peeing everywhere in the house. We take her to pee on the pee mat every few hours but despite that we have a few accidents in the day and she still pees in her bed on daily basis. We have fences the living room to save the couch and carpets to reduce our work. We thought dogs don’t pee in their bed but this one doesn’t mind.
At four months old, potty breaks every few hours isn't going to be often enough. My Molly was on 20 minute potty breaks until she was about 5 months old then we expanded to 30 minutes, then 40 minutes, then 60 minutes. Right around the 6.5-7 month mark we realized she was alerting for every single potty break and switched to demand base (and tbh it's still about every hour -- sometimes as little as every 30 minutes if she's been drinking a lot of water or if she has to poo suddenly).
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
I just want to say hang in there! You’re going to be ok, pay attention to the suggestions that are nice and ditch the judgements. Parents learn by doing, that’s just how it goes. I definitely agree with the biting suggestion, saying OUCH over and over worked for us, and sometimes a little whine to imitate littermates. We would also replace our finger/toe/whatever with a baby Kong so she’d understand she could teethe or chew on certain things.
The potty issues, hang in there. Take the good suggestions and just know ours had accidents until around 6 months, I think it’s just a part of growing and puppy-hood. Whenever ours had a growth spurt she’d sometimes lose a little ability to know she had to go. I am also a first time owner and some have said I’m the problem, all we can do is keep trying! You got this!
Thank you.
 
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