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I agree with DanaRuns...so I will not get on that band wagon. Owning and raising a puppy properly requires a certain amount of knowledge. Reading and research is necessary, as with anything we do in life that adds value to our lives. Going to crate training is a great idea and is the best method to house train a dog! But, you have to understand the process and associated details to do this. If you have not already done extensive research on crate training, please do it before you start. In that way you will have a good chance of success. Same goes for everything else about the puppy...learn how, then do the work!

Or sometimes, in cases like these, it is best to try and return the pup to the breeder so they can place the pup with someone more experienced. This may or may not be an option, but sometimes, breeders are open to this support.

Good Luck
 

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Hey thanks for your response. At least feels like I’m not the only one. Our trainer told us to crate train her too so that’s the next thing we will try. Alternately she said that we should keep increasing the pen and fence the home and slowly increase her radius rather than giving her the entire appartment which will also reduce accidents before she is fully trained. Will post you on progress. Thanks much
Hi there. I have raised a Golden puppy in a highrise, without a crate or pen. I followed Alexandre Rossi's method. He is a famous positive trainer in Brazil. I used pads and lots of treats. She was confined in the kitchen, although I would let her play in the living room with us sometimes. I would set her on the pad right after a meal, a drink, or a play session. I would say the word peepee over and over in a firm but friendly voice. And woudn´t let her come out of the pad. Once she urinated, I would give her a treat and lots of praise. It could take up to 10 minutes. And I sprayed the poo with ground ginger. It took little time for her to love the pads. They hate wet paws. Accidents would happen, of course, but very few. Needless to say it takes a lot of work and patience. Good luck with your land shark. She was my second Golden, and her biting was much worse than the first. Get her chewing toys and bones, and watch like a hawk. They outgrow the biting, and become such wonderful dogs. It is just a matter of time, and a lot of work. Just make it fun for all of you.
 

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Hi there. I have raised a Golden puppy in a highrise, without a crate or pen. I followed Alexandre Rossi's method. He is a famous positive trainer in Brazil. I used pads and lots of treats. She was confined in the kitchen, although I would let her play in the living room with us sometimes. I would set her on the pad right after a meal, a drink, or a play session. I would say the word peepee over and over in a firm but friendly voice. And woudn´t let her come out of the pad. Once she urinated, I would give her a treat and lots of praise. It could take up to 10 minutes. And I sprayed the poo with ground ginger. It took little time for her to love the pads. They hate wet paws. Accidents would happen, of course, but very few. Needless to say it takes a lot of work and patience. Good luck with your land shark. She was my second Golden, and her biting was much worse than the first. Get her chewing toys and bones, and watch like a hawk. They outgrow the biting, and become such wonderful dogs. It is just a matter of time, and a lot of work. Just make it fun for all of you.
Was it easy to eventually swap from pads to outside? I never used pads (electing instead to run her to the elevator and outside) since I was worried it'd be really difficult to get rid of the pads in the future.
 

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Was it easy to eventually swap from pads to outside? I never used pads (electing instead to run her to the elevator and outside) since I was worried it'd be really difficult to get rid of the pads in the future.
When she was allowed to go out, I would the same thing on grass. It took many walks until the first pee on grass. She got treats and lots of praises. She is 10 now. She pees on grass, sand, pavement, disposable, and ecofriendly pads. We live in a house now. But if I need to let her stay with my daugther at her apartment, she will pee on pads while my daughter is at work. If I have to leave her for a long time on her own, I will always leave pads available. I hate the idea of a dog holding her pee. But could be I am lucky to have a dog who will pee anywhere.
 

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Was it easy to eventually swap from pads to outside? I never used pads (electing instead to run her to the elevator and outside) since I was worried it'd be really difficult to get rid of the pads in the future.
Just realized that my yorkies also peed on pads and grass, although one of them was lazy, and prefered pads when at home. But on a walk? Oh boy, they peed in every pole available.
 

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Just realized that my yorkies also peed on pads and grass, although one of them was lazy, and prefered pads when at home. But on a walk? Oh boy, they peed in every pole available.
Mm yeah, I was also always afraid that there would be that one bath math in a friend's house that would resemble a pad too closely haha
 

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I hope @Sweet Girl chimes in soon! I think she raised at least one of her puppies from a high rise apartment?
 

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Hi there, I hope we haven't scared you off, I know it can be overwhelming. I've raised my youngest male golden in a high rise apartment as I'm from Singapore. 16 floors up. I got him when he was 3 months, so his bladder control is slightly better than that of an 8 week puppy, but only marginally so

BUT IT IS DOABLE. You just have to be REALLY REALLY diligent.

Ditch all your puppy pads and trays, and remove all the floor mats in your house or any material on the floor that can be confused by the puppy as a pee area. do not let her on the coach until she is more reliable. its not her fault, the pee pads have confused her- sofa fabric & puppy pads feel pretty much the same. Set a timer and watch like a hawk. start from scratch. When she is awake, playing and extra active, bring her out every 20-30 minutes as a gauge. If you see any behaviour that indicates she is going to pee.. sniffing etc, IMMEDIATELY bring her out, regardless if the timer you set still had 10 minutes left before her next pee break. Reward instantly when she goes, repeat a key word as well so she knows. then head back upstairs. repeat and repeat.

back to basics. She needs to go after waking up, eating, drinking, midway during play time (I realized most accidents happened for me when my boy was very engrossed with play. he would be playing so happily then suddenly remember the existence of his bladder and let go wherever he was, so I started to interrupt his play time and bringing him down). the key is to preempt that she needs to pee before she actually starts wanting to go in your apartment. After awhile she will learn to hold it in longer. they say its an hour every month, so at 4 months technically she can hold it in for 4 hours, but cut that in half and use 2 hours as a gauge instead, and 20-30 minutes when she is awake and active.

Keep this schedule up for the next month and she should be trained by 5 months. they learn SUPER fast if YOU are diligent.
 

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I hope @Sweet Girl chimes in soon! I think she raised at least one of her puppies from a high rise apartment?
No - I was just in a third floor walk-up (with a grassy yard). And I ran up and down the stairs every 60 minutes holding my puppy for the first two weeks or so. I had buns of steel! 😄

I would never do a high rise with a baby puppy. Just a personal thing. Would not want to balcony or pee pad train, and I think an elevator makes it way too challenging to get a puppy out fast enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
No - I was just in a third floor walk-up (with a grassy yard). And I ran up and down the stairs every 60 minutes holding my puppy for the first two weeks or so. I had buns of steel! 😄

I would never do a high rise with a baby puppy. Just a personal thing. Would not want to balcony or pee pad train, and I think an elevator makes it way too challenging to get a puppy out fast enough.
In our case the high rise management has a penalty if they find the dog fouling common area, so we have to take her outside the building for her to poo. That’s a min of 7-8 mins walk.
 

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In our case the high rise management has a penalty if they find the dog fouling common area, so we have to take her outside the building for her to poo. That’s a min of 7-8 mins walk.
But didn't you know this would be the situation before you made the decision to bring home a puppy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
But didn't you know this would be the situation before you made the decision to bring home a puppy?
We didn’t imagine these challenges in details. Having said we are copying with it. We have scheduled set up wherein we take her for walks 4 times a day for her 4 poops. Impossible to take her every 20 mins for pee. We need to find her a way to just pee on the pee pad. Our society has over 100 dogs, and we have almost 10 golden retriever in the neighbourhood. We can’t change our choice and have to try and give the best to Hazel our puppy
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Hi there. I have raised a Golden puppy in a highrise, without a crate or pen. I followed Alexandre Rossi's method. He is a famous positive trainer in Brazil. I used pads and lots of treats. She was confined in the kitchen, although I would let her play in the living room with us sometimes. I would set her on the pad right after a meal, a drink, or a play session. I would say the word peepee over and over in a firm but friendly voice. And woudn´t let her come out of the pad. Once she urinated, I would give her a treat and lots of praise. It could take up to 10 minutes. And I sprayed the poo with ground ginger. It took little time for her to love the pads. They hate wet paws. Accidents would happen, of course, but very few. Needless to say it takes a lot of work and patience. Good luck with your land shark. She was my second Golden, and her biting was much worse than the first. Get her chewing toys and bones, and watch like a hawk. They outgrow the biting, and become such wonderful dogs. It is just a matter of time, and a lot of work. Just make it fun for all of you.
Thanks. Does he have any videos in English? I looked him on YouTube but not in English.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Little puppies need taking out often- every half hour the first couple weeks. They need to be in a very small crate when there are not eyes on them. Being in a high rise, you cannot do what normal people would do, catch beginning of squat, pickup and carry out. So your living situation has you at a disadvantage and puppy at a greater one.
We don't agree- returning pup is oftentimes the best situation. I care only about puppy and puppy's ability to have a happy life. I can't imagine the breeder knowing you were in a highrise and still selling you a puppy.
We live in Hong Kong where we don’t have house options. 99% of people live in high rises, yet Hong Kong has probably one of the highest density of dog ownership. I moved my house to a relatively open area with a dog park next door just for our puppy. We are trying our best but yet it’s a very tough job. The breeders here are not as nice as in US or Australia unfortunately. We didn’t get proper education.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Thanks we have seen this one but haven’t bought yet. Will consider this. Thanks
Here's the most important thing: IT'S NOT TOO LATE!!!
This puppy is still super young (4 months). But as others said, you need to start over. Pretend you just rescued a 4 month old from the pound who hasn't had a good life so far. Do your research NOW!
My very first puppy, I took more than a month of time off. I think that maybe that wasn't necessary, but immensely helpful. The combination of being a clueless owner (you can do all the research you want, ****'s gonna hit the fan) and a very young puppy is usually best navigated if the puppy is your only priority. Many people recommend taking 2 weeks off. Now that I know much more about pups and dogs, I don't think I need that month. But I'm taking it off for my new puppy this year anyway because it's worth it. I've saved vacation days for years planning for this. So do that now. Take time off work, do your research, and make your puppy your only priority. Even an old dog can learn new tricks, but a puppy is still very easy to train and mold.
Also, my first pup was a lab (similar enough to goldens for all intents and purposes), and I also lived in an apartment (once you have to go into an elevator to get out, I don't think it matters so much how many floors anyway). It was challenging at first, but it worked. Why? Because every morning at 7AM, I went to a park (not dog park) and played with her for an hour. I repeated this every 2-3 hours (even once I was back to work). Puppies are harder than kids at first. But luckily they grow up and mature faster. This only happens correctly if you put in the time.
If you can't, it hurts my heart to see pups given back or re-homed. It breaks my heart to see a pup that should have been given up or re-homed.
Don't forget the creed: there are no bad dogs, only bad owners.
how do you make the puppy stay on the pee mat till she pees? Should we put a fence around the pee mat so she does her business ans doesn’t walk away?
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
how do you make the puppy stay on the pee mat till she pees? Should we put a fence around the pee mat so she does her business ans doesn’t walk away?
By 4 months I expect my puppies to be completely crate trained. This means no accidents in the crate. It is 100% my responsibility to make sure this happens. The high rise is an added challenge, but one you were fully aware of when you made the decision to bring this puppy home. When my puppies are in the beginning stages of crate training my biggest priority is making sure they are successful at not having an accident.

Here’s a very simple version. Take puppy out of crate. Carry it outside and let it be outside until it pees/poops. Take puppy back in for 20-30 minutes of supervised play. Walk puppy again and place it back in the crate for one hour. Keep repeating. As you reach success with this amount of time slowly increase by 15 min.

I never look at a puppy having an accident in the house as their fault, but mine. I clearly didn’t do my job in training them. Every-time it happens I look at the entire situation and change what went wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I'm so sorry you are having trouble with your puppy. I hope it helps to know you are not alone! The forum is full of threads from puppy owners who are frustrated and not enjoying their new puppy. Puppies are a lot of work! A first time puppy owner living in a high-rise apartment will find housebreaking a puppy particularly challenging. The threads that Nolefan posted should help get you started with some ideas. There are many other helpful threads here in the forum; I encourage you to use the search function to search things like "crate training," "land shark," "puppy biting," "puppy leash training," etc. You can also find some good online resources (Kikopup is one that is often recommended, as is the "Life with Rune" Facebook page, which has a library of "guides" for raising a Golden puppy throughout its first year of life.

I do agree that some of your problems are stemming from unrealistic expectations of your puppy. These two articles may help you gain a new perspective of things from your puppy's point of view:

Hang in there!
How do we fix this incorrect sitting posture ? Ok
 

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