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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there. After our 17 yr old female Golden passed in April, we were sure no more pets. Well, that didn't last. We happily adopted a male from a Golden Retriever rescue 3 wks ago. He is great in most everything. Our biggest concern right now is his separation anxiety. Although the foster family said he was crate trained we have not had much success with him spending short times in the crate when we go out. We don't make him sleep in the crate. He sleeps on the floor on a carpet and blanket beside our bed. The first day I went out for a short bit to the grocery. We put a camera on him and I was so relieved that he just messed with his stuffed kong and went to sleep. Was not as good the 2 other times I tried the crate. Last night we went out and he cried and howled for almost 3 hrs! I hate this...tears my heart out. He came from a family with kids but did not get much attention. He was kept outside most of the time. He spent one month with a foster family. The foster said first night in crate he cried and fussed a lot but then it got better and she also crated if no one was home for short durations. I know he is insecure from all that has happened to him. He follows us everywhere (even the bathroom). What to do? I want to help him feel secure but I can't be here 24/7. Tried baby gates in about a 500 sq ft area but he cried and howled and counter surfed some french bread. Do I have to crate him at night in order to crate him when I am out for short durations? What to do? Help! Thank you. Jo

p.s. he also seems to only go potty on walks and doesn't go in our grassy area out back. Inconvenient sometimes.... Advice needed please. we raised out other Goldie from puppy so she was very secure and didn't have these issues.
 

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Last night we went out and he cried and howled for almost 3 hrs!
You'll be seeing some hard time teaching him to be alone.

Idea is, that you crate him and leave the room. When wailing/crying starts, you DO NOT go back. You HAVE TO wait out the wailing/crying part. Once he has settled down quietly and relaxed, then you can go to him and let him out. But don't make letting him out a big thing. Just walk over to the crate, praise him, open the door and walk away.

With each time, you can extend the time you're away from him. The alone training starts from puppyhood, with 1 min alone, then 2 mins alone, then 5 mins alone, then 10, 30, 1h etc. But never go back to him during wailing/crying. Since if you go to him during wailing/crying, he will learn that when he wails/cries, he can get you to come to him and/or release him. That only prolongs the wailing/crying time next time. And this training is going to be hard for you, since his wailing/crying has extended to 3h, which is a lot.

Also, you doing "cold turkey" with him doesn't help matters. Meaning that when you got him, you didn't do the gradual training that is needed for all dogs in new environment, regardless the age. Instead, you put him into the same situation as it was in his last home (with kids), where he was ignored for periods of time.

The alone training isn't a success within hours or days. It could take weeks, or even months before you get your dog to the point that he is comfortable being in his crate for extended periods of time.

He follows us everywhere (even the bathroom). What to do?
That is completely normal behavior for GRs. GRs are people's dog, meaning that they are eager to please their humans and follow you around, just in case you ask them a task to do. Also, they love doing tasks for you.
If you don't want this kind of behavior (following you around), look towards other breed of dogs. More independent ones, those that doesn't attach to the human that much. From the top of my head: Siberian Husky.

One option is to give your dog a task to do, when you want to go to bathroom. You could tell him to sit and wait for you.
Our pup is 3 months of age and when my missus goes to change clothes, she tells our pup to sit, just before closing the bedroom door in front of him (while making sure the pup sits down). I've seen our pup patiently waiting and sitting until change is done and she opens the door to come out. Afterwards praising our pup for waiting quietly in sit position.
 

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Congrats on your new boy.

Your boy has been with you for only 3 weeks, it often takes newly adopted dogs time to settle in and adjust to their new environment and people.

His entire world as he knew it has changed. He's gone from a family with children although he spent a lot of time away from them being outside, a foster home and now with you. Each situation is a new experience and routine for him.


Following you around or staying right with you is normal, I have a girl I adopted 4 months ago, she is my constant shadow. I've had 3 other Goldens, 2 were adopted, once they felt comfortable, they became more independent. Sometimes they stayed closed by but not directly under foot.

Does the GR Rescue you adopted him from have any Volunteers that are Trainers, Trainers they use or any they recommend?

Does he know basic commands? If not, there are all kinds of training videos online you can watch and use to train them. Teaching him basic commands will help build his confidence and will create a bond between you.

Crate training-you can feed him in his crate and give him treats such as a stuffed frozen Kong or a bone. Put him in the crate for short periods of time, 5-15 minutes. You may want to take a short walk or go to a neighbors, then come back. Gradually increase the amount of time you are away.

What kind of exercise is he getting? Walks, time to run and burn off energy. I adopted my previous Golden at the age of 2, I walked him twice a day for at least a mile each time. I have a large fenced in yard, I spent 45 minutes to an hour playing ball with him where he could run and burn off his excess energy.

It's going to take time, lots of patience and being consistent. Working with a trainer will really help. Each dog is different, some take weeks, months to settle in and feel comfortable while others may need no adjustment period at all.
 

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Yes its going to take sometime for your new boy to adjust. When my brother adopted his male golden at 2 years, he had terrible separation anxiety. They couldn鈥檛 even close the toilet door to pee without setting him off barking and he had to have them in sight at all times. It took a couple of weeks for him to settle down and be less anxious, they ignored him when he barked and did not give him any attention ( eye contact etc), and only praised and gave affection when he was calm and quiet. in preparation for leaving him alone, my brother made sure to walk him and let him off for an off leash run right before heading out. They started with short durations since his anxiety was so bad. Just be consistent and patient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You'll be seeing some hard time teaching him to be alone.

Idea is, that you crate him and leave the room. When wailing/crying starts, you DO NOT go back. You HAVE TO wait out the wailing/crying part. Once he has settled down quietly and relaxed, then you can go to him and let him out. But don't make letting him out a big thing. Just walk over to the crate, praise him, open the door and walk away.

With each time, you can extend the time you're away from him. The alone training starts from puppyhood, with 1 min alone, then 2 mins alone, then 5 mins alone, then 10, 30, 1h etc. But never go back to him during wailing/crying. Since if you go to him during wailing/crying, he will learn that when he wails/cries, he can get you to come to him and/or release him. That only prolongs the wailing/crying time next time. And this training is going to be hard for you, since his wailing/crying has extended to 3h, which is a lot.

Also, you doing "cold turkey" with him doesn't help matters. Meaning that when you got him, you didn't do the gradual training that is needed for all dogs in new environment, regardless the age. Instead, you put him into the same situation as it was in his last home (with kids), where he was ignored for periods of time.

The alone training isn't a success within hours or days. It could take weeks, or even months before you get your dog to the point that he is comfortable being in his crate for extended periods of time.



That is completely normal behavior for GRs. GRs are people's dog, meaning that they are eager to please their humans and follow you around, just in case you ask them a task to do. Also, they love doing tasks for you.
If you don't want this kind of behavior (following you around), look towards other breed of dogs. More independent ones, those that doesn't attach to the human that much. From the top of my head: Siberian Husky.

One option is to give your dog a task to do, when you want to go to bathroom. You could tell him to sit and wait for you.
Our pup is 3 months of age and when my missus goes to change clothes, she tells our pup to sit, just before closing the bedroom door in front of him (while making sure the pup sits down). I've seen our pup patiently waiting and sitting until change is done and she opens the door to come out. Afterwards praising our pup for waiting quietly in sit position.
Thank you. Will try your suggestions. Didn't mean to sound "cold turkey" . He's only been crated 3 times over 3 wks. Two times for 2 hrs and one time for 3 hrs. First time not a peep. Second time some crying/howling. 3rd time 3 hrs crying and howling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You'll be seeing some hard time teaching him to be alone.

Idea is, that you crate him and leave the room. When wailing/crying starts, you DO NOT go back. You HAVE TO wait out the wailing/crying part. Once he has settled down quietly and relaxed, then you can go to him and let him out. But don't make letting him out a big thing. Just walk over to the crate, praise him, open the door and walk away.

With each time, you can extend the time you're away from him. The alone training starts from puppyhood, with 1 min alone, then 2 mins alone, then 5 mins alone, then 10, 30, 1h etc. But never go back to him during wailing/crying. Since if you go to him during wailing/crying, he will learn that when he wails/cries, he can get you to come to him and/or release him. That only prolongs the wailing/crying time next time. And this training is going to be hard for you, since his wailing/crying has extended to 3h, which is a lot.

Also, you doing "cold turkey" with him doesn't help matters. Meaning that when you got him, you didn't do the gradual training that is needed for all dogs in new environment, regardless the age. Instead, you put him into the same situation as it was in his last home (with kids), where he was ignored for periods of time.

The alone training isn't a success within hours or days. It could take weeks, or even months before you get your dog to the point that he is comfortable being in his crate for extended periods of time.



That is completely normal behavior for GRs. GRs are people's dog, meaning that they are eager to please their humans and follow you around, just in case you ask them a task to do. Also, they love doing tasks for you.
If you don't want this kind of behavior (following you around), look towards other breed of dogs. More independent ones, those that doesn't attach to the human that much. From the top of my head: Siberian Husky.

One option is to give your dog a task to do, when you want to go to bathroom. You could tell him to sit and wait for you.
Our pup is 3 months of age and when my missus goes to change clothes, she tells our pup to sit, just before closing the bedroom door in front of him (while making sure the pup sits down). I've seen our pup patiently waiting and sitting until change is done and she opens the door to come out. Afterwards praising our pup for waiting quietly in sit position.

Maybe we don't do often enough??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You'll be seeing some hard time teaching him to be alone.

Idea is, that you crate him and leave the room. When wailing/crying starts, you DO NOT go back. You HAVE TO wait out the wailing/crying part. Once he has settled down quietly and relaxed, then you can go to him and let him out. But don't make letting him out a big thing. Just walk over to the crate, praise him, open the door and walk away.

With each time, you can extend the time you're away from him. The alone training starts from puppyhood, with 1 min alone, then 2 mins alone, then 5 mins alone, then 10, 30, 1h etc. But never go back to him during wailing/crying. Since if you go to him during wailing/crying, he will learn that when he wails/cries, he can get you to come to him and/or release him. That only prolongs the wailing/crying time next time. And this training is going to be hard for you, since his wailing/crying has extended to 3h, which is a lot.

Also, you doing "cold turkey" with him doesn't help matters. Meaning that when you got him, you didn't do the gradual training that is needed for all dogs in new environment, regardless the age. Instead, you put him into the same situation as it was in his last home (with kids), where he was ignored for periods of time.

The alone training isn't a success within hours or days. It could take weeks, or even months before you get your dog to the point that he is comfortable being in his crate for extended periods of time.



That is completely normal behavior for GRs. GRs are people's dog, meaning that they are eager to please their humans and follow you around, just in case you ask them a task to do. Also, they love doing tasks for you.
If you don't want this kind of behavior (following you around), look towards other breed of dogs. More independent ones, those that doesn't attach to the human that much. From the top of my head: Siberian Husky.

One option is to give your dog a task to do, when you want to go to bathroom. You could tell him to sit and wait for you.
Our pup is 3 months of age and when my missus goes to change clothes, she tells our pup to sit, just before closing the bedroom door in front of him (while making sure the pup sits down). I've seen our pup patiently waiting and sitting until change is done and she opens the door to come out. Afterwards praising our pup for waiting quietly in sit position.

This is my 3rd golden. The others did not do this. He is getting better. Probably due to his still being insecure in 3rd location in his life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes its going to take sometime for your new boy to adjust. When my brother adopted his male golden at 2 years, he had terrible separation anxiety. They couldn鈥檛 even close the toilet door to pee without setting him off barking and he had to have them in sight at all times. It took a couple of weeks for him to settle down and be less anxious, they ignored him when he barked and did not give him any attention ( eye contact etc), and only praised and gave affection when he was calm and quiet. in preparation for leaving him alone, my brother made sure to walk him and let him off for an off leash run right before heading out. They started with short durations since his anxiety was so bad. Just be consistent and patient.

Thank you. We are being patient. It only bothers me that he gets upset. We can't do off leash this soon in the game. Fear he would run away. We do walk him before trying to crate. Maybe we need a consistent crate schedule instead of as needed...?? Do a stuffed Kong. Is there a safe yummy long lasting chew that he won't fracture a tooth on? Himalayan chews?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Congrats on your new boy.

Your boy has been with you for only 3 weeks, it often takes newly adopted dogs time to settle in and adjust to their new environment and people.

His entire world as he knew it has changed. He's gone from a family with children although he spent a lot of time away from them being outside, a foster home and now with you. Each situation is a new experience and routine for him.


Following you around or staying right with you is normal, I have a girl I adopted 4 months ago, she is my constant shadow. I've had 3 other Goldens, 2 were adopted, once they felt comfortable, they became more independent. Sometimes they stayed closed by but not directly under foot.

Does the GR Rescue you adopted him from have any Volunteers that are Trainers, Trainers they use or any they recommend?

Does he know basic commands? If not, there are all kinds of training videos online you can watch and use to train them. Teaching him basic commands will help build his confidence and will create a bond between you.

Crate training-you can feed him in his crate and give him treats such as a stuffed frozen Kong or a bone. Put him in the crate for short periods of time, 5-15 minutes. You may want to take a short walk or go to a neighbors, then come back. Gradually increase the amount of time you are away.

What kind of exercise is he getting? Walks, time to run and burn off energy. I adopted my previous Golden at the age of 2, I walked him twice a day for at least a mile each time. I have a large fenced in yard, I spent 45 minutes to an hour playing ball with him where he could run and burn off his excess energy.

It's going to take time, lots of patience and being consistent. Working with a trainer will really help. Each dog is different, some take weeks, months to settle in and feel comfortable while others may need no adjustment period at all.

He gets a lot of exercise. We always walk him before crating. Short durations is good idea. Should we develop a crate schedule and not just do as needed when I run an errand? He sleeps on a rug with a favorite blanket beside our bed and is no trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Maybe we don't do often enough??
Should we develop a crate schedule instead of as needed? Maybe too long goes by without using it so he seems to regress. Does he have to sleep in it? He's good at night in our bedroom.
 

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If you're only walking him and he's not getting off leash time to run, (if you have a fenced in yard) he's not getting enough exercise to burn off excess energy. Goldens, especially young ones, need the time to run.

You can set a crate schedule or do it randomly throughout the day. Sometimes I think it's better to do it randomly so they don't figure out the schedule especially if they are having a training issues such as being crated or being left. There may be times when you have to go somewhere and crate him, I think it's better he adapts to whatever my come up as far as your schedule.

If he does well at night not being crated, I don't think it's necessary but that's up to you. I don't crate my girl at night, she sleeps in bed with me. I also don't crate her when I leave. She does fine not being crated, doesn't get into any trouble, doesn't tear up anything. As long she behaves herself, I allow her the freedom. If she starts getting into trouble, then she will be crated for her own safety, not as punishment.

Hope you'll share pictures of your boy with us, we'd love to see him.
 

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I was in your exact position a year ago. My Polar Bear is my first rescue golden and my family and I were out of our depth! We started out crating him for 15 to 20 minutes at a time and he never liked it. Silly as it sounds, zoom meeting with him helped immensely! I'd set up the laptop in front of his crate and once he started barking, someone from the family would turn the camera on, so that he could see them, and tell him he was okay. We did that for a few months until we started baby gating him in the kitchen. We had to put everything away, but he was much calmer since he could roam around and look out the windows and patio door. He seemed much more secure and since doing that, I've only had to come home once in the past 8ish months to stop him from barking. Since its only been three weeks, I'd keep crating him for short, random periods and seeing how he does. Rescue dogs are a whole different breed. If someone told me when I first got Polar Bear that he'd end up being a calm, happy to go anywhere and do anything kind of dog, I would've said they were crazy! But it did take a year to get there, he was abused and so so scared when we got him. It all takes time and your boy may turn out to love his crate once he feels secure.

As for the only pottying on walks issue, Polar Bear did that as well. Walking him around the backyard helped him learn he could potty back there too. I keep my dogs on a potty schedule and they have always done great with it. Maybe taking him for walks at regular intervals to pee could get him used to a schedule and then you could try letting him out in the backyard at those intervals later on.
 

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Thank you. Will try your suggestions. Didn't mean to sound "cold turkey" . He's only been crated 3 times over 3 wks. Two times for 2 hrs and one time for 3 hrs. First time not a peep. Second time some crying/howling. 3rd time 3 hrs crying and howling.
Thing is, do you know for a fact that your dog can comfortably last several hours in the crate at your home? Without any prior exercise of crate training at your place? Here, there is a difference for a dog, if the crate was in his old place, at foster home or at your place. That is, unless, the crate is the very same one (with familiar smell to your dog).

The thing with dogs is, that when environment changes, they, at first, are wary/scared and behave quite well out of fear. Once they get comfortable enough and feel secure, behavior problems start to appear. That would explain why he was quiet in the 1st time in the crate but vocal on 2nd and 3rd time.

I too suggest that you do the crate training daily, and not only when there is a need. 3 times per 3 weeks is way too less.

Here's how to crate train a dog;
From another topic, comes this guide of mine that i shared based on my own experience with out pup (pics in my sig):

Crate training goes like so:
  • Introduce the dog to the cage as his new home. The dog should start training with the cage early, let him rest and sleep in the cage. It teaches him that it is comfortable and safe to be in his new "room".
  • Encourage the dog to go to its own cage. If necessary, place the dog treat in a cage. It is normal for him to be a little timid at first and try to move away. The dog must be treated with understanding and must not be forced. Don't close the door. Let him move in or out the way he wants.
  • When he is no longer afraid of the cage, keep his hand in front of the exit and let him be in the cage for a while. Gradually increase the cage time. Don't forget to praise him!
  • If the dog also feels comfortable with this exercise (probably after a few days of short training sessions), you can try to close the cage door. Now the door is closed and again we must not forget to praise the dog! Soon the dog will feel comfortable in his new home even when the cage door is closed.
  • You can now gradually move away from the dog and the cage, while constantly praising him for his good behavior. Soon the dog sits calmly in the cage and agrees to sleep with his door closed in his new home.

With our pup, we did essentially the same, where:
1st, we set up the crate and pen in living room, doors open, so he can get comfortable of new things in our home.
On 2nd day, we moved the crate to the final resting place, doors open, so he can get used to with crate in another room. He freely went in and out. Oh, we also put a blanket on top of it, covering top and 2 sides. Leaving door side and front side open, so he can see us while in there, while having the burrow feel.
On 3rd day, i started to use treats to get him into there. Treat to get in and once in, i praised him.
On 4th day, i stand in front of the door, blocking access out. At the end of the day, i was able to close the cage door while he was in it. No wailing. But i didn't lock him in for the night.
On 5th day, for daytime nap, i lured him in the crate with treats and locked him in for the daytime nap.
From 6th day and onwards, i can lure him into the crate with treats (we haven't gone to puppy training and we don't have command to get him into the crate) but once i close the door, he stays there comfortably and ca be in there for several hours. Also, he isn't wailing when we leave room and he doesn't see us (we've also done some alone training with him).

I have crate for sleeping/treats and pen for playing/calming down. Though, he has fallen into sleep in the pen as well.
At current moment, we put our pup into pen and crate at random times, so that he knows that both places are comfortable for him. He stays in both without issues and will be quiet for several hours.
At the time of me writing this, our pup has been in the crate for 3 hours now, quietly (mostly sleeping) but i'll be letting him out since we need to go for a (potty) walk, and after that, feed time. :)

Oh, when you go to let your dog out of a crate, you may praise him for staying quiet (only approach when he is quiet) and then just open crate door and walk away. Don't make the letting out of a crate a big thing, else-ways dog can get exited again and you'd have issues with it in the future (putting into the crate to calm down, but dog gets exited again when let out). Idea is that dog remains calm when exiting crate/pen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thing is, do you know for a fact that your dog can comfortably last several hours in the crate at your home? Without any prior exercise of crate training at your place? Here, there is a difference for a dog, if the crate was in his old place, at foster home or at your place. That is, unless, the crate is the very same one (with familiar smell to your dog).

The thing with dogs is, that when environment changes, they, at first, are wary/scared and behave quite well out of fear. Once they get comfortable enough and feel secure, behavior problems start to appear. That would explain why he was quiet in the 1st time in the crate but vocal on 2nd and 3rd time.

I too suggest that you do the crate training daily, and not only when there is a need. 3 times per 3 weeks is way too less.

Here's how to crate train a dog;
From another topic, comes this guide of mine that i shared based on my own experience with out pup (pics in my sig):



At current moment, we put our pup into pen and crate at random times, so that he knows that both places are comfortable for him. He stays in both without issues and will be quiet for several hours.
At the time of me writing this, our pup has been in the crate for 3 hours now, quietly (mostly sleeping) but i'll be letting him out since we need to go for a (potty) walk, and after that, feed time. :)

Oh, when you go to let your dog out of a crate, you may praise him for staying quiet (only approach when he is quiet) and then just open crate door and walk away. Don't make the letting out of a crate a big thing, else-ways dog can get exited again and you'd have issues with it in the future (putting into the crate to calm down, but dog gets exited again when let out). Idea is that dog remains calm when exiting crate/pen.
If you're only walking him and he's not getting off leash time to run, (if you have a fenced in yard) he's not getting enough exercise to burn off excess energy. Goldens, especially young ones, need the time to run.

You can set a crate schedule or do it randomly throughout the day. Sometimes I think it's better to do it randomly so they don't figure out the schedule especially if they are having a training issues such as being crated or being left. There may be times when you have to go somewhere and crate him, I think it's better he adapts to whatever my come up as far as your schedule.

If he does well at night not being crated, I don't think it's necessary but that's up to you. I don't crate my girl at night, she sleeps in bed with me. I also don't crate her when I leave. She does fine not being crated, doesn't get into any trouble, doesn't tear up anything. As long she behaves herself, I allow her the freedom. If she starts getting into trouble, then she will be crated for her own safety, not as punishment.

Hope you'll share pictures of your boy with us, we'd love to see him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
He gets at least 4 walks a day. My husband runs him. He is off leash in our fenced yard and is learning to use the doggy doors during the day supervised .Not safe to be off leash anywhere else. We have ordinances, he is new and he has shown aggression to other dogs at times. He is getting better all the time. Yesterday I made sure he went potty and fixed him a stuffed Kong. I also put a nightgown in that I had worn. Not a peep and was in 2 hrs! Going to try again tomorrow. He was crate trained before but like previous poster said...new environment & insecurity. I don't ever use the crate as punnishment but have come to understand it can be a source of security. He didn't do well with gates on a 500 sq ft area. .Thank you for your advice. Baby steps....
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Liver Fawn
 

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I'm a little late to the conversation but will let you know what I did - now my younger boy Blaze loves his crate, More than I ever thought possible.
Because he was a very active impulsive puppy, crating him was necessary in certain situations. I made going into the crate a game. I put surprise food treats in his crate when he was somewhere else so when he came into the room, he would scurry to see if his crate contained a surprise. Don't do it consistently and not an any type of schedule. The idea is to make it a game and a happy surprise. I trained him to go into his crate for a short duration (30 minutes max) using either a frozen Kong or some kibble. The crate became associated with good things only. I didn't "have" to crate him much because someone was usually home. Sometimes he would go into his crate with his little face peeking out - waiting for a treat. I reinforced this behavior.
Now he's 2 and rests in his crate on his own. He is still very high drive and excitable and when both dogs are mixing it up in the house a little too much and I say "enough" he will go to his crate to settle himself down.
I never had any of my dogs sleep in the crate overnight. They are always with us at night and seem to like it that way.
Yours being a rescue and clingy, I'm in favor of you allowing him to be close to you overnight and not in the crate.
It might be that Blaze likes his crate so much because he actually spends very little time in it with the door closed. But he has zero issues with it when I must leave him crated for a few hours.
So if I were in your shoes, I would work on making the crate a fun place to be for surprise treats (or toys) each day randomly.
When you are teaching him the down/stay. Do it with him inside the crate. Open the door "stay", close the door "stay", repeat maybe 5 times. Randomly reward with a treat in between, He should not think he can get up and leave as soon as the door opens. Only on your release word should he come out.
A little at a time and make it a very cheerful happy game.
It astounds me how much my Blaze loves the crate. I never worked this hard with any of my dogs because none were as impulsive and high drive. But all the impulse control work has paid dividends now.
Good luck and enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I was in your exact position a year ago. My Polar Bear is my first rescue golden and my family and I were out of our depth! We started out crating him for 15 to 20 minutes at a time and he never liked it. Silly as it sounds, zoom meeting with him helped immensely! I'd set up the laptop in front of his crate and once he started barking, someone from the family would turn the camera on, so that he could see them, and tell him he was okay. We did that for a few months until we started baby gating him in the kitchen. We had to put everything away, but he was much calmer since he could roam around and look out the windows and patio door. He seemed much more secure and since doing that, I've only had to come home once in the past 8ish months to stop him from barking. Since its only been three weeks, I'd keep crating him for short, random periods and seeing how he does. Rescue dogs are a whole different breed. If someone told me when I first got Polar Bear that he'd end up being a calm, happy to go anywhere and do anything kind of dog, I would've said they were crazy! But it did take a year to get there, he was abused and so so scared when we got him. It all takes time and your boy may turn out to love his crate once he feels secure.

As for the only pottying on walks issue, Polar Bear did that as well. Walking him around the backyard helped him learn he could potty back there too. I keep my dogs on a potty schedule and they have always done great with it. Maybe taking him for walks at regular intervals to pee could get him used to a schedule and then you could try letting him out in the backyard at those intervals later on.
We did talk to him via the camera but that made him worse. I think then he had an expectation we were there. It's getting better. Thank you. Dealing with leash reactivity. Been improving but consulting a trainer this weekend. Want to be able to take him places and let him have play dates without fearing he will fight. He was also only neutered 2 weeks before we got him so since he will be 3 in November he is very much alpha and perhaps protective over his new mom and dad.
 
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