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My 1yr old was just diagnosed with this. He'd been limping on and off for a couple of weeks so I decided to finally take him in since he wasn't getting over the limp on his own. The vet took some x-rays and noticed lesions on his shoulder bone. The perscription: strict rest which means no rambunctious play, no walks, no jumping on or off furniture or in vehicles, basically no impact on that shoulder joint. We've got anti inflammatories. This will go on for the next month. If no progress then we'll be recommended to a board certified surgeon to do an arthroscopy procedure and remove some bone flaps. We hope he can get over this on his own but even if he doesn't we're still optimistic because this procedure has a 90% recovery rate which is good. Our biggest obstacle is keeping him on strict rest because he's always been an active pup. I've been taking him on nightly rides in my car which sets pretty low to the ground. I still help him get out just to err on the side of caution. I figure the poor guy has to have some excitement in his life! We've also been giving him raw hide bones to keep him distracted and occupied.

Has anyone been through this with their pup? Anyone had to have this type of surgery? Did it fix the problem? Have any suggestions for ways to keep him distracted that doesn't involve putting impact on his shoulder?
 

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Humankind. Be both.
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Poor guy... and poor you! OCD is no fun!

I'd start by feeding all his meals out of tightly stuffed KONG toys. Also, check out www.clickertraining.com. There are several behaviors you can shape that don't involve his shoulders. The learning process will help work his mind. A few that come to mind:

Cross Your Paws (while in a down)

Nose targeting - can be done from a sit. Bumping your hand w/ his nose.

Looking to either side on cue.

Head Down and keeping it there.

"dead dog" - lying flat on his "good side"

Looking up or down (like nodding "yes") on cue

Variation on nose targeting where he touches his nose to your hand and keeps it there for a duration. Work up to him keeping it there even if you slowly move your hand, so it looks like he's stuck!
 

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New Mommy
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I have friends, whose pup just went through this . He is 100% now. You would never know he had any problem. We just got back from the lake with him, he swam 6-8 hours a day and never limped once. His operation was in April of this year.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Poor guy... and poor you! OCD is no fun!

I'd start by feeding all his meals out of tightly stuffed KONG toys. Also, check out www.clickertraining.com. There are several behaviors you can shape that don't involve his shoulders. The learning process will help work his mind. A few that come to mind:

Cross Your Paws (while in a down)

Nose targeting - can be done from a sit. Bumping your hand w/ his nose.

Looking to either side on cue.

Head Down and keeping it there.

"dead dog" - lying flat on his "good side"

Looking up or down (like nodding "yes") on cue

Variation on nose targeting where he touches his nose to your hand and keeps it there for a duration. Work up to him keeping it there even if you slowly move your hand, so it looks like he's stuck!
Thank you for the suggestions. Different training methods would be a great way to stimulate his mind without impact on that shoulder. We'll definately have to start working on that.

We also have a baby due in October! So if he must have this surgery then we'll definately be busy busy between taking care of a newborn and taking care of recovering golden (i hear it takes between 6-8 weeks)!

Thanks again for all your helpful suggestion
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have friends, whose pup just went through this . He is 100% now. You would never know he had any problem. We just got back from the lake with him, he swam 6-8 hours a day and never limped once. His operation was in April of this year.
Thanks! That sounds very encouraging for us! Dozer and I appreciate it!
 

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Maryland
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OCD can go away on it's own. But that can take MONTHS of pain for the dog.

Or it might not, and then he may need arthroscopic surgery (don't get regular surgery...look for an arthroscopic surgeon for him...it's SO much less invasive, and healing time is much much much shorter) to remove the irritating "mice" (bone chips). Plus, being that it's the shoulder, there's a much better chance of success than in the elbow.

OR your Vet can try Adequan shots...weekly...for a few weeks to see if that helps. It will often work, and the dog will be just fine. It's NOT a pain killer, or an anti-inflammatory...it helps to repair the damage, which if it works, stops the pain.

OCD is very painful for them...and usually NSAIDs do nothing to help. (Like Rimadyl, Deramaxx, etc).

One day the limp may suddenly disappear, but I'd try to help the poor guy out and try the Adequan injections...it worked for us on one of ours. After 5 treatments (once a week) the limp went away and never returned. And the "joint mice" were gone. The joint was normal again. And the dog was pain free! And it's worked for many others that I know, as well.

Here's a link with info about Adequan...I highly recommend asking the Vet if he's willing to try it. He probably just never thought of it. Mine didn't. I had to ask him to try it.

It was originally used only on horses, so large animal Vets are very familiar with it ... but it's used a great deal on dogs too for arthritis...and for OCD (mentioned in the link).

Even tho OCD isn't arthritis (yet can lead to it), Adequan "cushions" the joint..and makes the dog's pain go away.

A: Adequan® Canine (POLYSULFATED GLYCOSAMINOGLYCAN) stimulates cartilage repair processes, binds to damaged cartilage and suppresses the enzymes that eat away at joints. It helps keep joints lubricated, making movement easier and increases your dog's comfort by reducing inflammation and relieving pain.
Adequan® Canine (POLYSULFATED GLYCOSAMINOGLYCAN) is the only product on the market that has been clinically shown to help treat the disease while also offering relief from pain. It modifies the disease cycle, stimulates cartilage repair processes and diminishes joint damage while also reducing the pain caused by osteoarthritis.
http://www.luitpold.com/canine/faq/faq.htm

Best of luck. I hope this clears up without surgery!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OCD can go away on it's own. But that can take MONTHS. Or not, and then may need arthroscopic surgery to remove the irritating "mice" (bone chips), which isn't terribly invasive. Plus, being that it's the shoulder, there's a much better chance of success than in the elbow.

OR your Vet can try Adequan shots...weekly...for a few weeks to see if that helps. It will often work, and the dog will be just fine.

It's very painful for them...and usually NSAIDs do nothing to help. (Like Rimadyl, Deramaxx, etc).

One day the limp may suddenly disappear, but I'd try to help the poor guy out and try the Adequan injections...it worked for us on one of ours. And it's worked for many others that I know, as well.

Here's a link with info about Adequan...I highly recommend asking the Vet if he's willing to try it. It was originally used only on horses, so large animal Vets are very familiar with it ... but it's used a great deal on dogs too for arthritis...and for OCD (mentioned in the link).

Even tho OCD isn't arthritis (yet can lead to it), Adequan "cushions" the joint..and makes the dog's pain go away.





http://www.luitpold.com/canine/faq/faq.htm

Best of luck. I hope this clears up without surgery!!
Thank you so much! I am interested in the info you gave me and will look further into it!
 

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Maryland
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I added some things to my original post....so go back and take a look. LOL We were posting at the same time (I was editing to give more info)

You're welcome!
 

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Back in 1988, I rescued a beutiful GR called Holly at the age of six months, from Birmingham in the UK. She was fine for about 3 months and started to limp quite badly from her rear legs after walking, and was stiff. We took her to our local vets at the time, and he said that she was artharitic, and would suffer for her whole life, and basically wanted to put her to sleep. We were having none of this and asked for a refereal to the Royal College of Veteniary Surgeons in Cambridge. There we had a consultation with a John Holton, who was writing a paper on the condition. He agreed to operate on Holly's rear legs, 1st one, and then the other 6 months later. She cam through the surgery fine, and after recovery did not limp again until she was taken from us prematurely at the age of 7, after drinking from a puddle, which tragically had some car anti-freeze in it, and her kidneys failed.
Try not to worry about the surgery, as I believe that now it is done by Key Hole, and is less invaisive than it was in the 1980's.

Good Luck........ I am sure that it will turn out fine.
 
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