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Two questions...I just bought an English Cream (color) Golden Retriever male puppy on a neuter contract, AKC. I was trying to find out what is the best puppy (kibble) food to feed a large breed puppy (so confusing)...when I came across a site saying that ONE IN TWO GOLDENS WILL DEVELOP CANCER BETWEEN AGES 3 AND 8, and also that ONE IN TWO WILL DEVELOP PYROMEDA OR SOME SORT OF SKIN DISEASE. I had no idea the health issues were THAT bad! I have had the puppy two weeks and already love him but now I am terrified..that is just too awful. I feel like he doesn't even have a chance!
I bought Solid Gold Wolf Puppy large breed and now after reading about how important calcium phosphorous levels are (but don't know what they should be)...I don't know what to feed because I think the bag said grain free and i see that is a no no for a large breed puppy. I feel scared and helpless already...and upset. Advice? Thanks....
 

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What is your breeder feeding? With all of the changes going on in this pup's young life, it's best to leave him on what he was being fed at the breeder otherwise he's likely to have tummy troubles.
 

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i think those numbers for the skin cancer etc are highly exaggerated.... as far as hot spots and other skin infections it is probably accurate... I think most goldens end up with a hot spot at some point in their life. Your solid gold is a good food.... I also would wonder what your breeder was feeding...

Remember goldens do have a double coat and they are susceptible to hot spots which can turn into infections... while these are a pain in the neck they are not a big deal and once you have had one you can easily deal with them... Keep in mind the best way to avoid skin infections and hot spots is to stay ahead of them... especially if you are in a hot humid climate and your dog swims alot... my girl connie has two on her butt right now... we cleaned them, sprayed them with antibiotic spray and they healed up in a matter of days...

don't panic or be terrified. the skin cancer risk I don't believe is that high... and the pyoderma risk well thats honestly just a skin infection... its ok ... yes some is food related some is environment related.

find out what your breeder was feeding... the solid gold is a good food.
but don't panic
 

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ONE IN TWO GOLDENS WILL DEVELOP CANCER BETWEEN AGES 3 AND 8, and also that ONE IN TWO WILL DEVELOP PYROMEDA OR SOME SORT OF SKIN DISEASE.
It sounds like a scammer is using scare tactics to market their food. By the way, it's totally false and misleading information that one in 2 goldens (50%) will develop cancer between ages 3 and 8--total bull.
 

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Thanks for the advice...it wasn't skin cancer....it was lympo...I actually don't remember without the article in front of me but it was all sorts of different internal cancers....???

About the solid gold....26% protein and i looked it is not grain free...what i am concerned about is that it does NOT list calcium or phosphorus amounts or rations....are you just expected to trust it because it says large breed puppy? it is 396 KCAL a cup or something like that....
 

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Here is the article...

The most common health problems in Golden Retrievers:

The Golden Retriever Club conducted a health survey that included nearly 1500 Goldens and concluded that 1 of every 2 Golden Retrievers will develop cancer. Hemangiosarcoma is the most common cancer in Goldens, followed by lymphosarcoma, mastocytoma, and osteosarcoma. In the club survey, 65% of the Goldens who died at 3-8 years old died of cancer. 70% of the Goldens who died at 8-13 years old died of cancer.
Skin diseases are also rampant, with 1 of every 2 Goldens developing some type of skin condition, especially allergies, which cause itchy skin and often lead to bacterial skin infections (pyoderma). Other skin diseases in Goldens include seborrhea, sebaceous adenitis, and lick granuloma. Non-tumorous growths (sebaceous cysts and lipomas) are frequently found on Golden Retrievers.
Golden Retrievers suffer from high rates of hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. The Orthopedic Foundation of America evaluated the hip X-rays of over 109,000 Golden Retrievers and found 20% dysplastic. That's bad, and the true rate is even higher because most of the obviously bad X-rays were not sent in for official evaluation. Over 14,000 elbow X-rays were evaluated and 12% were dysplastic, with the true rate even higher. For comparison, Flat-Coated Retrievers have a 4% hip dysplasia rate and a 1% elbow dysplasia rate.
Other common orthopedic health problems in Goldens include luxating patella (loose knees), osteochondritis, panosteitis, and cruciate ligament rupture.
Heart disease (especially sub-aortic stenosis and cardiomyopathy) is a major problem in Goldens, with up to 15% of the breed affected by some form of heart problem.
Epilepsy (seizures) is a major concern in Golden Retrievers, with an estimated 7% of the breed affected.
Cataracts are the most common eye disease in Goldens, with up to 13% of the breed affected. Cataracts can occur in Golden Retriever puppies or in middle-aged dogs and may or may not lead to blindness.
Eyelash abnormalities and an eyelid abnormality called entropion are common in Goldens. More serious eye diseases such as glaucoma, retinal dysplasia, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) can also occur.
Hormonal/endocrine diseases include hypothyroidism (the Michigan State University Thyroid Database reports up to 18% of Golden Retrievers have low thyroid levels), Cushing's disease, and occasionally diabetes.
von Willebrand's blood-clotting disease occurs regularly.
As with all deep-chested breeds, Golden Retrievers are at higher-than-normal risk for the emergency gastrointestinal syndrome called bloat.
Ear infections are common in Goldens due to all the hair inside the ear canal.
Other Golden Retriever health problems include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, megaesophagus, myasthenia gravis, laryngeal paralysis, and liver shunt.
Goldens are prone to losing pigment on their nose in the winter – this is usually a harmless condition called "snow nose". Also note that many Goldens turn white around their muzzle at a fairly young age, and this is normal for the breed.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You can see why...as a brand new GR puppy owner and in love with my little guy...I was devastated and scared to death.
 

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We've had two Goldens. Our first one lived to 14 1/2 and didn't get cancer. She had arthritis in the end.

Our present Golden is 10 1/2 and so far so good. Nothing remarkable except a torn ACL last summer.

The thing about odds and statistics is that for some the percent is 0 and for others, it's 100%. As with any living thing, we take the best care possible, provide the best protection we can and are the most vigilant parents we can be.

The rest is not under our control. The best thing you can do for you Golden is REALLY know him and know the signs of being 'off'. Everything caught early is much more treatable.
 

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In the club survey, 65% of the Goldens who died at 3-8 years old died of cancer.
I think you misread what they were saying. Of all Goldens in the survey who died between 3 and 8, 65% were attributed to cancer. That's a lot different from saying 50% of all goldens between the ages of 3 and 8 die of cancer. The former is likely true (at least for the dogs in the survey), the latter is not true at all out in the real world.
 

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thank you so much for your advice. I am wondering also....the breeder is AKC and her male is hip penned and ofa tested elbows and knees (hope i am saying this right) but the female is not tested. She has a very nice place with 2 males and 4 females (but one was just retired). She no longer shows. She did tell me that out of 9 puppies one had to be euthanzied for megaesophagus. My puppy seems fine. She was very honest about it and my vet is her vet. I did not know at the time that that can affect all puppies in the litter. She has a two year genetic health guarantee. Should i go have my puppy have a barium swallow? Best to know now rather than later? thx again
 

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We've had two Goldens. Our first one lived to 14 1/2 and didn't get cancer. She had arthritis in the end.

Our present Golden is 10 1/2 and so far so good. Nothing remarkable except a torn ACL last summer.

The thing about odds and statistics is that for some the percent is 0 and for others, it's 100%. As with any living thing, we take the best care possible, provide the best protection we can and are the most vigilant parents we can be.

The rest is not under our control. The best thing you can do for you Golden is REALLY know him and know the signs of being 'off'. Everything caught early is much more treatable.
I couldn't agree more. You can do your research, homework and be super vigilant but when it comes right down to it, it's just the luck of the draw with genetics. I've know people who have goldens for 14, 15 years with no problems whatsoever. I had my Jesse for 5 and she had just about everything they mentioned in that article: allergies, hip problems, torn acl, cancer, lipomas....I could go on and on. Like Penny's mom said, just know your golden really well and when she seems like not herself.
 

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It may be true that 1 in 2 goldens will develop cancer, but that includes at any point in their life - even those who live long full lives and develop cancer at over the age of 15.
 

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Take a deep breath. Goldens have the same life expectancy as other dogs the same size.

However wrote that little litany of health problems was a bit of an alarmist. Pyoderma, for example, is just a fancy name for a hot spot. In some dogs, they're a serious, constant problem, but that's rare. My dog Comet got one under each ear when he was 8 months old as the result of scratching at an ear infection from swimming, and now he's 4 1/2 and hasn't had another since. They scabbed over in 24 hours and were gone in a week. He's never had another ear infection. I just didn't know to clean his ears after swimming.

Many (I think most) of the common problems listed there are vastly reduced by good breeding practices. Hip and elbow dysplasia rates, for example, are cut in half by doing clearances, so you can imagine how far they get reduced when a breeder does multigenerational clearances on dogs who also prove their structure in conformation and sport. Most (maybe all) of the eye diseases are reduced by doing CERF clearances.

There are lots of carelessly bred Goldens out there, and lots of breeders who skimp on clearances or even lie about their value in order to turn a quick buck. Those dogs have unnecessarily elevated risks of the common illnesses. However, a dog bred according to the GRCA code of ethics and to the even higher standards of a great breeder has an incredibly good shot at a long, healthy life.

So as long as you were careful in your selection of breeders, your dog as at least a good a shot as any other dog, and probably better.
 

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It may be true that 1 in 2 goldens will develop cancer, but that includes at any point in their life - even those who live long full lives and develop cancer at over the age of 15.
Right. Since cancer risks skyrockets with age, Goldens may simply be seeing higher rates because they don't die of things like heart disease or bacterial infection.
 

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I think you misread what they were saying. Of all Goldens in the survey who died between 3 and 8, 65% were attributed to cancer. That's a lot different from saying 50% of all goldens between the ages of 3 and 8 die of cancer. The former is likely true (at least for the dogs in the survey), the latter is not true at all out in the real world.
Very good point.
 

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When I first took Aspen in for her puppy shots, the vet said, "Congratulations! You just got yourself the breed with the highest cancer rate!" Luckily, I already was aware of the high cancer rate, or I probably would have started crying. He went on to say, that even with the high rate of cancer...Goldens are a wonderful breed, and are totally worth the health risks.

We lost our Yellow Lab to cancer, and it was awful. But, went through it, and we survived the loss and the grief. We can do it again. Of course, we're hoping for a long, healthy life for Aspen, but at least we're going into this knowing what the risks are. Just love your doggie every day for it's whole life...no matter how long or short it may turn out to be.
 
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