Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
regspeir
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Having just retired and with some time, I would love to enjoy my 7-month-0ld Cooper, our 3rd (and probably last) golden in some novel ways. My other 2 goldens were amazing friends and great family “pets.” I have NO experience or knowledge of obedience beyond beginning levels, no knowlege at all of agility, etc. Cooper, while AKC registered, etc. may have no particular breeding for any of these. Are there “competitions” or trials/levels of things we could actually have a chance of dealing (having success) with? Which is the least “stuffy” (or with the least haughty folks) and the most fun? So far I have done the typical - puppy class and now starting a next-level “manners 1” class at another facility. What troubles me is that the terminology and sequence/progression are so different. If I knew where I was heading, I sense i could be more efficient. Anyone have anything I could read or some advice, or is this silly and bound to lead to frustration?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
Absolutely not silly. One thing I have found is that the more I train my dogs, the deeper our bond gets. And of my four dogs, only one was purchased with competition in mind, the rest were rescues or from BYB.

You might enjoy rally obedience, it is a less formal form of competition obedience that involves following a course of different obedience skills. And if you're able, get into a beginner's agility class and give it a try to see how you like it. My personal favorite is traditional obedience competition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,267 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

Observing competitions is the best way to see what they are all about. Contact your local Golden Retreiver club and inquire about different events in your area.

Use your summer to continue working with Cooper on his basic obedience and attending the competitions that sound interesting. I'm sure Cooper would be welcome to go with you and observe. It would be great for his socializing, but always ask first.

After completing 2 years of obedience training with Our Penny we found she wanted to be a pet and nothing more. We hoped for therapy work, but she's not a cuddler and not particularly interested in people. We tried agility but found out that despite her zoomy behavior she's exciteable but not high energy. She's likes hanging around with us, also retired, going to the barn with me, going to the beach and dune buggying, going to horse shows and napping on the couch. She's 'just a pet'.;)
 

·
2 goldens and a BMD
Joined
·
841 Posts
If you're interested in it, go for it! Find a beginners level class in your area and try it out (but be careful -- dog sports can be addicting). In a beginner level class, they'll start to explain terminology and the rules of the game. It'll take a few classes in most sports to come up to speed before you're ready to step out into the ring.

My AKC registered golden with no particular breeding in his background is the one that introduced me to dog sports. He's done agility, rally, obedience, and field work. Although he decided he doesn't like formal obedience after a couple of matches, so since it's like pulling teeth with him, we won't do any more. He's got his Excellent level agility titles and at the age of 7 discovered field work so we're working on his JH.

I've found most people I've met in any of the performance events have been really nice. There are always exceptions to the rule, but for the most part, everyone is willing to help a newbie out and answer questions.

It sounds like you're doing the right things with Cooper at this point. Regardless of what direction(s) you decide to try, having a solid obedience foundation is crucial. Good luck and have fun!
 

·
Tracer, Rumor & Cady
Joined
·
10,683 Posts
If you want to learn more GO FOR IT! :) Your dog will most likely love learning with you! :):)
There are lots of different 'levels' for most dogs sports...everything from 'for your own enjoyment' to those competing at very 'high levels'. If your dog is with you and you are having fun...he is a happy and one very lucky pup!

There is a woman in our area that is in her late 70's has some pretty severe arthritis in her hands and knees. She & her Australian shepherd compete in agility they have a ball and are pretty darn good too!

Good basic obedience skills are necessary for daily life and for all dog sports. IMO Obedience training never stops.

There are also other things that will make it more fun for you and your dog. If your dog is not crate trained...start now...if you hope to go to matches and shows your dog will enjoy it more if he knows how to relax in his crate.
Teaching your pup to eliminate on command is REALLY helpful if you are involved in dog sports...
Learning to eat and drink from a pail in his crate....is also really helpful.

Have fun!!!!


Having just retired and with some time, I would love to enjoy my 7-month-0ld Cooper, our 3rd (and probably last) golden in some novel ways. My other 2 goldens were amazing friends and great family “pets.” I have NO experience or knowledge of obedience beyond beginning levels, no knowlege at all of agility, etc. Cooper, while AKC registered, etc. may have no particular breeding for any of these. Are there “competitions” or trials/levels of things we could actually have a chance of dealing (having success) with? Which is the least “stuffy” (or with the least haughty folks) and the most fun? So far I have done the typical - puppy class and now starting a next-level “manners 1” class at another facility. What troubles me is that the terminology and sequence/progression are so different. If I knew where I was heading, I sense i could be more efficient. Anyone have anything I could read or some advice, or is this silly and bound to lead to frustration?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,195 Posts
try them all! Don't forget tracking, field work, and dock diving, too!
You might want to register in UKC too, and see if there's a UKC club near you. A lot of times they tend to be (at least around here) smaller and more family oriented, and more friendly toward newbies. Not always, of course, but a lot of times.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I would suggest trying Rally obedience. Definitely less formal than traditional obedience but it does give you the skills to move up to traditional obedience and agility, plus it is "FUN".
 

·
shadow friend
Joined
·
3,886 Posts
I so want to do agility with our dog and my son as a family. I think that would be a lot of fun!! Dock diving would be fun too if Max could learn how to jump off a dock with great abandon. Good luck at whatever you decide to do!!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top