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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Casey's long down issues continue to haunt us! In addition he also decided that the judge was not fast enough telling us to fetch over the high jump and decided that he'd go anyway! On the bright side, he did quite a nice job heeling and on the other individual exercises, especially considering that it was outside and a dog was running agility next to us. Misery loves company--nobody qualified in open today!
 

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They get it
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Oh well, it happens to the best of us. Were you able to get a correction?
 

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Hopefully you were able to correct during the match...at sanctioned matches we typically can unless the judge is a real snot.
Just think how good he'll be when it comes show time!
Don't know how you feel about this....but can you have others correct him on the long down, especially your trainer who is acting like the judge? A lot of times when dogs aren't sure WHO is going to appear to give the correction, and realize you're not the only one capable of correcting him, they straighten out. Just a thought.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No correcting on the individual exercises (CKC rules in effect). I did ask the judge to put him back in place if he broke on the out of sight stays, and she obliged me. Good suggestions for future proofing. Thanks!
 

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I personally never enter sanctioned matches because if my dog messes up and I can't correct him, I feel like I've done more harm by entering. On the other hand, I enter every fun match, show and go, C match (whatever the club wants to call it) that I can get to, even if it means driving a few hours to get there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It was our "preview" for the upcoming trial Oct. 31-Nov.1, so I wanted to see how he would do in trial situation. It was really not so bad...and I know what to work on. His trial takes place where we train, and he holds his stays there.
He is an impatient guy, and "waiting" is not always his thing. We are working on it!
 

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Just a suggestion: Maybe try entering "exhibition only" next time. I'm not familiar with CKC, but in AKC you can enter in that category and you can train in the ring and correct as well.

Another suggestion as for him anticipating the dumbbell, in training straddle him. He will be between your legs and you will be like at the very ege of his chest/shoulder points. It's hard to explain, but you will throw the dumbbell, and keep him straddled and you will squeeze your thighs around him, once you tell him to take it, and let go of the straddle.

Hope this helps!
Sorry it didn't go as well as planned..maybe he just needs a bit more time to understand all of the Open exercises fully. Good luck!
If you need me to get a YouTube video of the dumbbell, PM me..I can do that for ya! =] My dog does it too! ;p
 

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For dogs that anticipate the dumbell, our trainers suggest you train him with a light 4 foot lead on him. Simply stand on the end of it. If he waits and you send him, move your foot, and off he goes. If you don't send him, he self-corrects.
 

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I just learned this straddle thing today..and it is working swell! I think that it is great because it also keeps that same drive for it...but you are able to control the anticipation..because you don't want to yell at the dog when they do go for the dumbbell, as that is the whole point is for them to go after it! The only thing that I am concerned about the leash thing, is that, what happens when the leash comes off? Dogs are smart and they can/do know when that leash is off. I've never used this technique before, but how do you phase off of the leash? I know this sounds really critical, but a leash is only a crutch..you use it twice in Novice and after that it comes off....JMHO!!!!!
 

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I guess the theory is that, once the dog knows what you want, he will do it correctly and it won't matter if the leash is on or off. It's a teaching device.

I just learned this straddle thing today..and it is working swell! I think that it is great because it also keeps that same drive for it...but you are able to control the anticipation..because you don't want to yell at the dog when they do go for the dumbbell, as that is the whole point is for them to go after it! The only thing that I am concerned about the leash thing, is that, what happens when the leash comes off? Dogs are smart and they can/do know when that leash is off. I've never used this technique before, but how do you phase off of the leash? I know this sounds really critical, but a leash is only a crutch..you use it twice in Novice and after that it comes off....JMHO!!!!!
 

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I just learned this straddle thing today..and it is working swell! I think that it is great because it also keeps that same drive for it...but you are able to control the anticipation..because you don't want to yell at the dog when they do go for the dumbbell, as that is the whole point is for them to go after it! The only thing that I am concerned about the leash thing, is that, what happens when the leash comes off? Dogs are smart and they can/do know when that leash is off. I've never used this technique before, but how do you phase off of the leash? I know this sounds really critical, but a leash is only a crutch..you use it twice in Novice and after that it comes off....JMHO!!!!!
Really the same thing could be said about the straddle....you certainly can't do that during the retrieve in the ring, and I think it's a lot more obvious when you remove the straddle than when you remove a leash.

IMO, the straddle is great for actively trying to teach a dog that has a consistent problem with anticipation. But for the dog with just an occasional problem, that you are getting ready to trial, I think the leash is a less obvious option. Of course, you want to use a very light-weight leash. With my small dog, I try not to use a clip at all, just tie a thin cord directly to the ring on his collar.
 

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I've found that giving the dog something *else* to do rather than *go* works well to prevent self-releasing, while keeping the drive within the desire to anticipate. For example, when I do dumbbell work, 5/10 times, I'll ask him to do something else FIRST.... so, Sit, Wait, I throw it, *cue down*, dog downs, puase, reward pause, THEN I send for the dumbbell.

They're anticipating b/c it's a behavior chain. Mix up the links in the chain.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
For Casey I think that this idea would work well. I had to do something similar for the drop on recall---otherwise he would always drop in the expected spot. For every drop I practice, we do 5-6 straight ins. He rarely anticipates on the retrieve, but the judge did take a long time!
 

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Gone to the Goldens ;)
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I've found that giving the dog something *else* to do rather than *go* works well to prevent self-releasing, while keeping the drive within the desire to anticipate. For example, when I do dumbbell work, 5/10 times, I'll ask him to do something else FIRST.... so, Sit, Wait, I throw it, *cue down*, dog downs, puase, reward pause, THEN I send for the dumbbell.

They're anticipating b/c it's a behavior chain. Mix up the links in the chain.
Steph, I proof my dumbbell anticipation much in the same way. I say "wait", throw it, tell Layla to get back (360 left in place), or heel in a small circle, etc. Then I send.
 

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Steph, I proof my dumbbell anticipation much in the same way. I say "wait", throw it, tell Layla to get back (360 left in place), or heel in a small circle, etc. Then I send.
I find it works really well! I use the same idea for the broad jump. Wait --- I get in position to send over the jump---- down my dog ---- walk back to him --- praise, pet, leave --- then cue the jump. Or on the DOR.... only drop 1 out of 4 or so trials and make the rest straight recalls. Sometimes I call him, don't drop him and turn and run away! Or call to front and then give a down cue rather than the finish!

I love keeping him on his toes!
 

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I find it works really well! I use the same idea for the broad jump. Wait --- I get in position to send over the jump---- down my dog ---- walk back to him --- praise, pet, leave --- then cue the jump. Or on the DOR.... only drop 1 out of 4 or so trials and make the rest straight recalls. Sometimes I call him, don't drop him and turn and run away! Or call to front and then give a down cue rather than the finish!

I love keeping him on his toes!
I love playing games with training and I am happy that the games and proofing have really built up attitude and drive in Layla. :)

I first started out training Aubrie with pattern training because that's what my first real obedience instructor taught. :doh::doh: It set us back months!
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My big guy held both out of sight stays at the fun match last night! HOORAY! I have gone right back to "kindergarten" this week on stays, assuming that he needed to understand just what stay meant. Casey was in "stay bootcamp"! Lots of proofing with antics, food, other people calling him etc when he was in a stay, and correcting when he broke, rewarding when he stayed. Last night, according to my coach, he looked relaxed and happy on both stays. Hopefully the end of this issue is in sight!
PS--The amorous dalmatian that triggered this issue a month ago also showed up at the show and go. I skipped the first stay for open dogs because he was in it--and he broke again and jumped another dog!! This after the judge had told anyone whose dog was not proofed for "trial" stays to wait for the practice ones. Egad! I am so glad I waited!!
 
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