Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I purchased a golden retriever recently as well as a friend of mine. Both of us purchased at reputable but different breeders.
My friend signed one of those non-breeding contracts. She was a little miffed because she felt like they waited for her to like the dog and make all the arrangements and then a last minute "oh by the way you have to sign this". The agreement required that she pay a $5000 fee should the dog ever be used for breeding.
Fortunately, my breeder did not have me sign such a deal. My friend feels suckered in but I think it is sour grapes on her part.
Nevertheless, this is the first pure bred I ever purchased and never heard of non-breeding contracts. Personally, I don't get it. I would never purchase a dog that the seller wanted to exert control over after purchase. Had my breeder tried to enforce in on me I would have walked away and looked for another breeder. I wonder what our world is coming to that someone can control whether your dog can have pups or not. And the $5000 fee is greedy if you ask me. I am flustered by this greedy commercialism that is permeating our society trying to control what we can and cannot do with our own things. I think the non-breeding contract is BS.
However, I am posting this to give someone a chance to give me another perspective. Be gentle, it's my first time.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,772 Posts
I think those contracts are awesome. I know of a few breeders who charge that amount and kudos to them. Those contracts are to protect the puppies they produce and sell into pet homes.

A pet home is one where the dogs would not be used for breeding. Period.

Greedy commercialism would be the mentality that you purchased a product and want to have the chance to produce more products to sell. <- That is the mentality that those $5000 penalties are intended to protect the puppies from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
The $5000 has nothing to do with the breeders trying to be greedy and make money, it is their attempt to use a strong deterrent that will actually matter to people to keep them from breeding a dog that, in the opinion of the breeder, is not a dog that should be bred. They are doing it in the interest of the dogs, not their pockets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,939 Posts
I do wish there was a way to decipher what a poster's definition of "reputable" is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,669 Posts
I purchased a golden retriever recently as well as a friend of mine. Both of us purchased at reputable but different breeders.
My friend signed one of those non-breeding contracts. She was a little miffed because she felt like they waited for her to like the dog and make all the arrangements and then a last minute "oh by the way you have to sign this". The agreement required that she pay a $5000 fee should the dog ever be used for breeding.
Fortunately, my breeder did not have me sign such a deal. My friend feels suckered in but I think it is sour grapes on her part.
Nevertheless, this is the first pure bred I ever purchased and never heard of non-breeding contracts. Personally, I don't get it. I would never purchase a dog that the seller wanted to exert control over after purchase. Had my breeder tried to enforce in on me I would have walked away and looked for another breeder. I wonder what our world is coming to that someone can control whether your dog can have pups or not. And the $5000 fee is greedy if you ask me. I am flustered by this greedy commercialism that is permeating our society trying to control what we can and cannot do with our own things. I think the non-breeding contract is BS.
However, I am posting this to give someone a chance to give me another perspective. Be gentle, it's my first time.

And why may I ask, is it so horrible?? Because it is the breeder's kennel name that is out there! Greedy?? I do not understand how that would be greedy. I would think of it as "Caring." I would not think Twice about it. If you do not plan to breed, then what difference does it make??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,939 Posts
If you didn't have to sign a non-breeding contract, the breeder you got your puppy from is not reputable.
Not necessarily true. If you go back to some of the older breeder threads focused on field goldens there are those out there that are selling on full registration. As for reputable, these breeders conform to the GRCA code of ethics, compete with their goldens & carefully screen (best I can tell) who they sell their pups to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
If you didn't have to sign a non-breeding contract, the breeder you got your puppy from is not reputable.
I would not agree with that statement. My breeder has been breeding for forty years, does all health clearances, shows/titles dogs, is active with the local golden retriever club, and acts as that area's puppy referral person. But I do not have a non breeding contract.

I would say that it is much more unusual to find a reputable breeder that does not at least do limited registration on pet puppies, but I don't think that lack of that alone makes one unreputable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,542 Posts
Not necessarily true. If you go back to some of the older breeder threads focused on field goldens there are those out there that are selling on full registration. As for reputable, these breeders conform to the GRCA code of ethics, compete with their goldens & carefully screen (best I can tell) who they sell their pups to.
I would not agree with that statement. My breeder has been breeding for forty years, does all health clearances, shows/titles dogs, is active with the local golden retriever club, and acts as that area's puppy referral person. But I do not have a non breeding contract.

I would say that it is much more unusual to find a reputable breeder that does not at least do limited registration on pet puppies, but I don't think that lack of that alone makes one unreputable.
Thanks for the info, I didn't mean to say it was 100% true, but on the other hand I cannot imagine that a breeder who cares about their reputation and their line would allow descendants of their dogs to be sold by BYBs or puppy stores or end up in puppy mills. There was another thread earlier, someone found that an ancestor of their puppy store dog was from a well-known and reputable breeder. If I were that breeder I would be very disappointed..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,149 Posts
Just in case the post is sincere. Most reputable breeders are breeding for themselves. They are looking for the next great dog to continue their line. Sometimes they get one great one, sometimes they are lucky and get more. The fact is that they will try to find show or performance homes for the puppies of great potential. When they do most breeders charge the same as pet puppies or more (it depends on the breeder). They will sell these great potential puppies on very different contracts depending on the type of home and the reputation of the buyer.
The $5000 for breeding sounds like a penalty not a show/performance/breeding puppy price. This means that the breeder does not believe the puppy has traits that should be used to improve the next generation (which should always be the goal). That is why it is being sold as a pet.
This contract is put in place to protect the puppy from being bred or used in say a puppy mill.
If the buyer is truly looking to start in to the wonderful world of show/performance goldens with thoughts of breeding their own dogs some day, they should tell the breeders that when they are looking. I can not think of a better way to find a first mentor. This breeder will be completely familiar with the line and is a wealth of knowledge. Now, I wil say it is difficult to get started and you have to work to build a relationship with the breeder before they will trust you with one of their intact precious babies.
Hope this info helps.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,772 Posts
I would not agree with that statement. My breeder has been breeding for forty years, does all health clearances, shows/titles dogs, is active with the local golden retriever club, and acts as that area's puppy referral person. But I do not have a non breeding contract.
Jodie - is that the norm for her though? Or did you receive full registration on your guy because you were a performance type home guaranteed to put titles on him (and I'm sure an OTCH someday with excellent hips - whyohwhy did you neuter him!)? :)

ETA - Jacks was our first guy purchased with a limited registration. Since we are not breeders or even people who'd consider breeding, it was nonissue. Our previous dogs had full registration, but breeding them was never a consideration. Back then I was mainly concerned about making sure the registration allowed us to show in obedience. :) I had friends back then who had dogs without papers who couldn't show in the AKC because of the fact. On one hand, I somehow feel that the AKC was shooting themselves in the foot by opening the door to unpapered dogs with the PAL or whatever registration. But my close friend back then had a cattle dog mix who was perfect in obedience. But of course she was stuck with the limited UKC shows.
 

·
Dad to Zip, born 8/4/06
Joined
·
60 Posts
When we adopted Zip, we had to sign a contract agreeing to have Zip fixed, not show him, and not breed him. I respect the breeder and I have confidence in the dogs they produce. We love Zip, but I also understand that only Zip's parents can make another Zip. Zip's offspring would not be up to their standard. I respect that they control the dogs they produce.

 

·
Inactive
Joined
·
11,326 Posts
Those penalties are the sign of a good breeder making an attempt to ensure that only the healthiest Golden Retriever puppies are produced and to ensure that no dogs from their lines end up in rescues. Period.

I too find the timing a little interesting here.

I also recently heard of an instance where a breeder did sue a buyer for breeching such a contract and was able to recover the penalty. Even in that instance, though, it wasn't to try to make money (the $5000 probably barely covers the cost of legal representation) but rather to protect the health of the breed and to prevent dogs from ending up in rescue.

The fact that a breeder cares so much about health and about every single dog is part of what tells you that it's a good breeder. If a breeder doesn't care about a dog after it leaves the property, what are the chances that the breeder really did everything to ensure health, ability, and longevity?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,492 Posts
Wow, I think the $5000 penalty is a great idea, especially now that the contracts are also having us wait 18 to 24 months to neuter our dogs ( which I totally agree with ). It makes the owner take the responsibility that s/he should be taking to be sure there are no breedings whether on purpose or accidental.

I always wondered what would happen if that contract was broken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
All puppies are not created equal, so their breeder makes a determination based on years of experience and or their mentors experience to decide what are the best homes for each puppy.

For example a pup with really high drive would do best in a performance home perhaps rathen running the average pet owner ragged. But it may be suitable to a runner or hiker, this is something the breeder needs to know and understand about her dogs.

They also need to make sure those that are show/breeding/performance level make it into appropriate homes that will honor that responsability because taking on that level of dog is a huge responsibility!

On the side of those buying it is best to be upfront stating when they contact you that you sell all pet puppies on contract and go over those terms explain to them why. Then its not a shock and they are an informed buyer and you point out to them you will be available for help for the life of their dog.

I have bought dogs for showing that had surprise terms when I went to pick them up, It was my choice to say no at that point and say you did not disclose those terms so I do not agree to them so will not continue with the purchase, or to say I will agree to those terms. And I have done both.

Be smart do your research ask to see the contract if there is one. Ask nicely for them to explain the why of anything you don't understand. People always say buyer beware but as someone who had the chance to be on the seller side they really really have to beware too and contracts protect both sides.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MikaTallulah
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top