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So retirement is just around the corner and now that my wife and I will have time I want to adopt a golden retriever. I love animals, but our busy work schedule didn't seem like it would have been fair to our pet, so we put it off. My wife wants a golden as much as I do, but she is concerned that a large dog will destroy the new hardwood floors that we have throughout our home. I know proper grooming and nail clipping will mitigate most of the issues, but just wondering what others have experienced. Like I said, its a dumb question, but I am curious about the experience of others with larger dogs and factory finished hardwood floors. thanks
S.
 

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Not a dumb question at all. If you have several coats of poly on your floors or if they are manufactured lumber (factory finished) it is unlikely a golden will do much, if any, damage. The larger problem is their tendency to slide around from any sudden movements, such as running to the door, chasing balls in the house, etc. This puts an undue strain on their joints which is something you really want to avoid. So... I would suggest large area rugs with either non skid backing or pads that are sold that will keep carpets from sliding. This will also serve to protect your hardwood floors if you are concerned about them. Finally keeping your puppy's nails clipped will help with the flooring. And after bringing a golden into your home and falling in love, you will probably not even care about the floors! 0:)
 

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That was my thought, but just checking. I am aware of the joint issues and sliding, so we will address that with rugs and such..I am looking forward to joining the club, now the quest to find the right puppy in Ohio or near by.
 

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My floors are not factory finished and only have a mediocre polyurethane coating. There are some scratches but I would take a scratched floor with a Golden Retriever over a pristine floor and no dog any day.
 

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It depends a lot on the quality of the wood flooring you have.

I know several people with wood flooring and their floors are really scratched up. My one neighbor had her floors sanded down and refinished a few times. You can only refinish the floors so many times before you have to replace them. She replaced her flooring not too long ago.
 

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I do think you need to be 100% sure that your wife understands that the floors with a big dog who sheds a ton will not be pristine - ever. My husband used to flip out when our dogs would go tearing around the house because, yes it does put scratches in the finish. You can only see them if you're looking at a certain angle. It has not compromised the wood, but no, our hardwoods do not look like they did the day after they were installed or even the day after they were refinished last year.

As mentioned above, I'd love to live in a model home with no clutter or dog hair or imperfections but I have a husband and 3 kids and 2 big dogs and I wouldn't trade a single one for all the perfect in the world. Do not gloss over (no pun intended :) ) this issue with your wife. Be sure she understands. Big dogs are harder on the house in many ways than little dogs but there is nothing like a Golden in my life. Also, a Golden puppy is a major project for the next couple of years, it's not just one puppy kindergarten class and done. It will take several classes and making the training and aerobic exercise on a daily basis a top priority. But it's worth it.
 

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One very easy way to help mitigate: no balls in the house. Balls are outdoor toys that get dropped at the front door or in the garage when we get home. Starts the first day we take a ball to the park. With both my dogs it was a very easy habit to form. And bonus - no risk of the skidding around and hurting joints.


Pristine? Never. :no: But you will love your dog so much, you won't care! :smile2:
 

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I have antique wide plank hardwood flooring throughout the downstairs of my house and currently have two Golden's. I picked the antique because of the character already in the wood, and because I knew my dogs would add more character to the flooring :) I also choose white oak because they said it wouldn't scratch, that wasn't true. They will scratch and dull the finish over time. My husband and I sand ours and put a new coat of satin finish on it every 5 years or so. I've found that the satin finish doesn't show as many little scratches as the gloss. I'm picky about my house, but in all honesty I love my dogs way more then I care about my floors. I also don't think my dogs are any harder on the floors then raising my two boys and having all their friends in and out was. The large area rugs are a must.
 

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Agree with what others have said.

If it's laminate flooring then the factory finish will be pretty tough. Our 100 year old house is tongue and groove oak upstairs and downstairs. Carpet only in a couple rooms. In our kitchen I sanded and put poly on 20 years ago, when I built new cabinets and redid the whole kitchen, and just had it redone last year by a pro. Not because of 20+ years of Goldens so much, just normal wear and tear. Living room, dining room and sun room are original varnish from the 1920's as far as I can tell.

There's very little damage to the floors from the dogs (all Goldens over the years). We do have some area rugs and/or runners here and there though too.

now the quest to find the right puppy in Ohio or near by.

If you are looking for a puppy in Ohio or nearby, I highly recommend contacting the person in the below link. There are some very reputable breeders in the state and western PA.

Good luck in your puppy search!

https://cvgrc.org/puppy-referral/
 
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