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Discussion Starter #1
:confused:Hi. We just got our second Golden girl, Emma, who is 9 weeks old. Our two year old Hannah was killed recently while at a "sitter". We have been devastated. We knew this new pup would not be like our Hannah but this new puppy is 100 degrees different. Very hyper and biting us. Also, not a lot of luck potty training. I am concerned about her personality overall. I love Goldens. Old, young, red, blond. But having experience with only Hannah who was so easy to train, I don't know if this behavior is normal. Tried several things to stop the biting: yipping at her like the bite hurt (it does). And when that didn't work we tried the looking in the eyes and kinda growling NO. That didn't work, so then we tried the grabbing by the scruff and saying NO firmly. She just lunges at us. I think she is playing but it hurts. And also it is not conducive to bonding... I'm frustrated. I want to giver her a chance to be trained. I contacted a local trainer. Any advice would help. I guess because she is so difficult in about every aspect of behavior whereas our Hannah had no problems (except returning when she was called) I am worried this may be a sign of lifelong problems. Thanks for any help ya'll can give.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Your's is a very common first time post. All puppies are different but a couple of suggestions to start with would be some bitter apple applied to your hands/arms and also lots of toys to offer as an appropriate thing to bite when she bites you. Goldens tend to be very oral dogs and experience their surroundings through their mouths. I have a three year old that still mouths everyone he meets (albeit mostly gently). If those don't work out for you I'm sure a search will turn up literally hundreds of ideas for you.

We would love to see some pictures of your little land shark.
 

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I also have a 9 week old baby and oh those teeth I forgot how sharp they are. I just keep redirecting her attention with all her chew toys. I know it will end one day and then I will wonder what all the fuss was about. I would not be worried about any lifelong problems as all puppies go through teething some worse than others, just keep those teethers on hand and redirect the biting. And remember I am going through the same thing
 

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Hang in there, she is trying to establish her place within your pack. We all had red raw hands the first weeks Tucker was home. Start with NILIF (Nothing in Life is Free). Just google it, and you will find what you need to know. Make her earn everything. I also recommend Ian Dunbar's book Before and After Getting your Puppy. Buy it now, and follow it. It will really help! I can also give you the name of an excellent trainer if you are in the Phila area in Pa. Welcome to the forum!

By the way, you have violated forum policy with your first post. You must post pictures of your puppy before asking any questions! We like payment in advance here! :)
 

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Get in puppy class ASAP

And a basic training class (two different things!).

Read some of the other posts here about puppy biting... prevention is a key. Some puppies bite more when they're tired... some when they need more exercise.

Feed your puppy all her food from food-dispensing-toys or feed through training activities. Use super cool fun chew toys.
 

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Substitution and removal from the playing environment worked best for us. IOW, when ever Angie got bitey we'd first try giving her a toy and if that didn't stop and she continued to bite at us (really Vicky more than me) then we'd scold her and immediately put her on the floor or down off of whatever she was on, etc... The point was to teach her 1) here's a toy to chew on and 2) if you bite us too hard we will not only scold you but cease to interact with you.

Would love to see some photos and our hearts go out to you for the loss of your two year old. Angie's almost two now and it would kill us to lose her.

Welcome aboard.
 

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I would say that you are having the typical golden puppy experience. It's like mine was anyways!! They are little land sharks and that's a very tough time but chin up, there are more just as fun phases to come!! Max is over a year now and he doesn't do nearly any of those trying things anymore so buckle down, I'm sure people here will give you great advice, and keep a positive attitude. It will all be worth it in the end!
 

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You are experiencing totally normal Golden puppy behaviour. They are mouthy little land sharks until they learn to redirect their teeth to toys.

Do a search in the puppy forum on biting, you will find hundreds of threads on this very subject, all with really good advice for how to deal with it.

Welcome to the board!
 

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They are not only handbiters but ankle biters, they grab bottom of your pants, then it goes to jumping on legs, you do the best you can do with lots of patience, not easy, lol but it does pass. I usually left the room for few minutes, you will get alot of good pointers. My Lucy is a year old Aug. and a doll, so glad those days are behind me, but miss the sweet puppy that spent alot of time sleeping on me.
 

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Chiming in to say that this is totally normal! It would be great if you could get her in a puppy socialization class (one where the puppies get free time to play) - they are the best at teaching each other how much teeth is too much. Make sure she has plenty of appropriate chew toys and redirect her to one of them when she starts to mouth you.

Murphy tended to be more bitey when he was overstimulated and tired, so we would put him in his crate for a nap when he get really bad.
 

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Welcome to the group. Im sorry to hear your problems with the puppy. I feel that you got her too quickly after losing Hannah and so this is going to be a difficult time for you all. What happened to Hannah?

You are comparing her and that isnt fair. I have an 8 week old litter here and all the behaviour you are talking about I see every day, its completely normal play. I suggest you buy a box full of toys and when she bites you, you replace whatever is under attack with a toy. Pick her up and cuddle her, play with her and when you have had enough, pop her behind a baby gate where she can unwind.

If you had got this puppy when you had Hannah all this natural play would have been directed at Hannah and she would have put her in her place.

Dont give up, take your time and you will fall in love with this baby.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all so much!! I am not computer literate so I'm not sure how to post a photo. We will try tho. Hannah our 2 year old was at a sitter. I had used this woman last year several times. She was recommended from a friend who had left her dog there. This time she left Hannah at the back of the house to play in the pool and she mowed the lawn. We were in NY at an antique show (we are in the business) and she called to say "I can't find your dog". She had never called her "dog" before... She said Hannah did not run down the drieveway and she had checked the "ditches". We immediately drove back to Pa. Searched for 4 days. Day and night. Made phone calls, visited shelters, made hundreds of fliers. On Wednesday we got a call. A man said his daughter saw a dog hit by a car on the road in front of this woman's house. He gave us 3/4 mile radius. My husband searched in the ditch. And found our beloved Hannah right across from the woman's house. She must have run right down the driveway into the road. We live in Pa 4 months of the year and the rest of the time in TX. We decided we couldn't leave Hannah in Pa so we had her cremated. Now she is right here with us. We waited 26 years for our girl. My husband is retired AF and we couldn't have a Golden until 2 years ago. She was everything we wanted. I see now that she really was different. So calm, and smart!! She was our child. Some think we are crazy to love her so very much. I have cried everyday since her death. Also, the woman who was "watching" her takes no responsibility. Never said she was sorry. So here we are. I needed Hannah far more than she ever needed me. Maybe it was too soon to get Emma. My husband said if we don't get another Golden soon he wouldn't be able to ever. I really knew Emma would/could not be our Hannah. This mouthing, lunging, biting, squirming is nothing we went through with Hannah. So it is worrisome. She is a doll but we haven't been able cuddle w/her. She has episodes of what we call "crazy dog" (Hannah did this in Hotels after a long day of travel, and yes we always stopped all the time to let her our) she runs like mad from one end of the living room to the other 100 mph. I am going to contact a puppy class today. I am so thankful for all of your replies. It is helping to know that other people have gone through this and a gentle Emma is somewhere around the corner. I am so glad for all your help. Please stay tuned.
 

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We all know what you mean by "Crazy Dog". There is an official term for this in Golden Speak:

"The Zoomies".

This, too, is normal.

From everything I've read here so far your Pup is acting the same as 99% of all Golden Puppies.

Goldens don't typically become the mystical creatures we all know and love until they are between 2 and 3 years old. That's when they separate themselves from other breeds and become what everyone is after :)

Until then, they are the same as every other Puppy.
 

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Im so sorry to hear about Hannah it must have been an enormous blow to you both. We all love our goldens and understand your husbands reasons behind getting another puppy.

Hannah and your pup are from different lines so will be totally different. Try standing in my kitchen when ten pups were doing 'zoomies' i can never stop laughing at them, its so funny and they never seem to crash into each other or the table.

If you want to give that pup a hug, wrap her in a towel and cradle her like a baby. I do that with our pups within days of being born and they love to lay in your arms, flat on their backs to go to sleep.

Give yourselves time to recover from Hannahs death and look at the puppy as something very different. xx
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the kind words of encouragement. I wanted to let you all know that this morning we took Emma to a trainer. She did an assessment and said that Emma is "dominant" and "independent". Not that she can't be trained. She did say that Emma needs to be taught the right way not to bite. So we talked about whether she is the right fit for our family. She also said that Emma may need a solid year of training. So,
do we have the financial means and also the time to invest in this type of puppy?
We are going to call the breeder to discuss this. Oh, also Emma has an under-bite. This could pose problems later but not necessarily. This is so difficult. I have cried and cried. I have read where some breeders pick the pup for the family. I now see why. Who better to know the personality of the puppy than the breeder? We picked Emma (who was the last in the litter) in 5 minutes. Not smart. Puppy kindergarten starts tomorrow night so we have a huge decision to make. Thanks for listening.
 

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Obviously, this is a very personal situation, but you are not alone. We had to put our 12 year-old golden, Lexi, down in March, and picked up a new puppy in the middle of May, at 8 weeks old. Our kids are grown up and on their own, and we missed having a dog around.

Sadie, our puppy, is very different from what Lexi was as a pup. She is much more rambunctious. Lexi was sweet, and somewhat timid, even as a puppy. Sadie is afraid of nothing and bites and nips a lot more than Lexi did. She lunges too, so you have to watch your face. Sadie is a barker. Lexi rarely barked.

However, Sadie has some redeeming qualities. She is a retrieving machine. She loves to play with us in the yard. She stays in the yard. Lexi would bolt, at the first opportunity, then play cat and mouse until she got tired, running all over the neighborhood.

Sadie is just as affectionate, she just has to be tired out before she wants to cuddle. Sadie was an absolute breeze to house-train. She just does not go in the house, and hasn't since she was 9 weeks. Lexi wasn't difficult, but was nothing like Sadie.

Sadie is better on the leash early-on. Lexi turned out very well, but was VERY challenging for the first few years.

We convinced ourselves that we had to be very open-minded about Sadie, because it was obvious that she was very different. Hey... so were our three kids! We knew that if we got down on Sadie, we would not bond with her. Then she would not have a chance.

Over the past 10 weeks, we have built a bond, and we are totally committed to her, and it is paying off. She just wants to be with us. Yesterday, I moved her crate from our bedroom into our kitchen because I thought it would be a little cooler in the kitchen during the day, when we have to go to work. Last night, at bedtime, Sadie barked and barked and barked. I let her out of the crate and she ran into our bedroom and laid down where her crate had been. I moved the crate back into the bedroom. She went right into the crate and fell asleep within seconds. Sadie makes me smile. She makes me laugh. Sometimes she makes me cry... OUCH!

You mentioned that Emma is only 9 weeks. It sounds like you are going to talk to the breeder and possibly return Emma. As I mentioned, it is a very personal decision, and you have to do what's right for you, but things will get better. Can a trainer know at this point in time how challenging it will be, or how long it will take? I'm a natural born skeptic, but I would say no. I'd give it a little more time before making a decision.
 

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Thanks for the kind words of encouragement. I wanted to let you all know that this morning we took Emma to a trainer. She did an assessment and said that Emma is "dominant" and "independent". Not that she can't be trained. She did say that Emma needs to be taught the right way not to bite. So we talked about whether she is the right fit for our family. She also said that Emma may need a solid year of training. So,
do we have the financial means and also the time to invest in this type of puppy?
We are going to call the breeder to discuss this. Oh, also Emma has an under-bite. This could pose problems later but not necessarily. This is so difficult. I have cried and cried. I have read where some breeders pick the pup for the family. I now see why. Who better to know the personality of the puppy than the breeder? We picked Emma (who was the last in the litter) in 5 minutes. Not smart. Puppy kindergarten starts tomorrow night so we have a huge decision to make. Thanks for listening.
I'm not a trainer, but everything you have described sounds like normal puppy behavior....not "dominant" behavior. I find it interesting that the trainer is saying she needs a solid year of private training...but maybe you have more faith in your trainer not doing this for their own financial gain (since I assume he/she would be providing the solid year of private training?) I may be out of line in saying that, but it's just a thought. We were fine with a puppy class and working with Jack at home. And he was a bitey little guy - I cried several times because he was just being a nightmare! It's a trying time at that age, but you WILL get through it.

Also, we had a golden with an underbite growing up...she lived until she was just shy of 16 years old. The underbite was not something we ever noticed and was never a problem.
 

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I'm not a trainer, but everything you have described sounds like normal puppy behavior....not "dominant" behavior. I find it interesting that the trainer is saying she needs a solid year of private training...but maybe you have more faith in your trainer not doing this for their own financial gain (since I assume he/she would be providing the solid year of private training?) I may be out of line in saying that, but it's just a thought. We were fine with a puppy class and working with Jack at home. And he was a bitey little guy - I cried several times because he was just being a nightmare! It's a trying time at that age, but you WILL get through it.

Also, we had a golden with an underbite growing up...she lived until she was just shy of 16 years old. The underbite was not something we ever noticed and was never a problem.

I agree with this. We got Katie when she was 2 so we never went through the land shark phase. When we got Angie she was a handful and my wife thought she was going to lose her mind between the nipping and insanely energetic behavor, but once Angie got the excess energy out of her system she was so loving and sweet and now at 21 months is an incredible dog. She's not Katie but just as great of a dog in her own unique way.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you all so much. Your support makes a big difference to me. I want to hear what you think and about your past experiences. We talked to the breeder and she disagrees with the trainer. So, we have an appt. with a local vet tomorrow. Will talk to him and see what he thinks. One thing I thing I am skeptical about: the breeder said to "flick" Emma in the nose when she bites. Can't be a good thing to do... I don't want to give up too soon. I told myself this puppy wouldn't be like Hannah. But was I prepared for it? Oh, and the puppy kindergarten is at the same facility as the trainer I saw today. However, it is with a different trainer. Do ya'll think they are just trying to "fatten" their pockets? Emma is sleeping right now. Can someone tell me how to post a pic of her and of course one of our late Hannah? Thanks. Peg
 
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