Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I should probably introduce myself and my owner. I am Joi. I have a 6 year old Golden Retriever named Daisy. We have had her since she was 6 weeks old when we picked her up from a local breeder in Strawberry Plains, TN. She is a very loving (and loved) pet to myself, my husband and our 2 kids. She is a bit head shy but we think that may be due to the fact we had a very overbearing Border Collie up until 2 years ago ( he is no longer with us ).. he was the epitome of an older sibling..LOL, he always had to be the first to do anything and Daisy had to learn to be second and patient....

ANYway, I was originally getting on google tonight to find something to help Daisy with her yeast infections in her ears. No matter what type of antibiotics we put her on, they would always come back. We clean and clean but the gunk is now getting worse. Since the vet bills keep getting higher and higher, I decided to find an alternative way to handle it.

I found a *recipe* and was doing more research and came across whether or not the food they (I also have a 5 year old male Boxer) eat could be causing Daisy's ear infections. I am seriously considering going homemade (cooked) and am so overwhelmed by everything that is out there.

I am coming across quite a few responses of *make sure you have the right balance of this and that* I am so scared that if I go homemade, I will not do it correctly and further complicate their health. I know that feeding my dog what you feed your dog may not be right for them...so how do I find what is right?

Daisy is 70 lbs and Max (Boxer) is about the same, but solid. I found something hat it affordable and sounds like they may enjoy it, but am confused on whether or not I should also be giving a supplement.

The recipe is as follows:
60% ground turkey
30% veggies
10% rice (but I heard rice wasn't good from a few posters)

I am not sure the amounts I should be mixing, but I know that 3-5 cups is what both breeds need a day.




TOTALLY different note, but does anyone know anything about an ear cleaner to help with her yeast? I found this one:

1 tube Monistat (generic is fine)
1 tube Polysporin (use the real deal - it's inexpensive)
1 tube Cortaid (generic works here as well)


Thanks in advance, I am so glad I found this site!

Joi
 

·
Beware of Nestle Purina
Joined
·
5,720 Posts
I swear by Blue brew but others here swear by the recipe you have listed above.
 

·
In the Moment
Joined
·
20,515 Posts
One of our breeder members posted that ear recipe a year or two ago and many have had very good luck with it.
 

·
Momma to angel Cody
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Joi, before you change anything, I would suggest getting Daisy's thyroid checked. Goldens are hypothyroid dogs waiting to happen sometimes, and if her thyroid function is low, you may never get rid of the ear infections. If your vet says she's in the normal range, find out the actual numbers. Low normal often needs supplementation in goldens, even when it doesn't in other breeds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,286 Posts
I'm afraid the diet recipe you posted is woefully inadequate. It may be fine for a VERY short time, but not long term.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
What food are you currently feeding?

My Bentley had yeasty and gunky ears for the first five years of his life until I switched him to grain-free kibble. The past 5 years have been really good. About 6 months ago I tried him once again on a very simple ingredient kibble with grain, and the ear problems came right back. Grain-free may or may not be the problem for your dog, but it is an easy enough thing to try.

You may have to have one more round of topical ear antibiotic to clear the current infection; while in the mean time try a grain-free kibble. I clean my dogs' ears each week with a 50/50 solution of apple cider vinegar and water.

Home-cooked meals for dogs isn't rocket science, but it does take some reading and research to do it correctly. No one recipe would be good to feed exclusively. Thirty percent veggies, IMO, is too much; and there are a variety of healthier carbs than white rice. . . such as quinoa, oatmeal, sweet potato, etc. Adding calcium (such as from ground egg shells) to a 100% home-cooked diet is important also.

Maybe first find a kibble that agrees with your dog. Then research home-cooked if you want to and try if for part or all of a dinner meal occasionally. It's nice to know your dog has one kibble it does well on for when you're too busy to cook or have to leave the dog with someone else.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top