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Kirsten and Whiskey
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Whiskey will be 6 months on the 6th. When he got his last round of vaccinations, the vet brought up having him neutered. Our breeder strongly recommended having him neutered between 18 and 24 months of age. When I mentioned this to our vet he stated that it was up to me, but there is no real evidence that doing it sooner or later is beneficial. He fealt that there was no reason for me to wait unless I planned on breeding him (which I have no intentions of).
One of my concerns is that this winter I will be dogsitting my mother's male/neutered standard poodle. In the past, the dogs have been fine together. (as recent as 1 month ago). I just worry that he might start to leg lift and develop behavioral issues with all of his raging hormones.
Just was looking for some advice. Are there advantages to health and growth by waiting to have him neutered, or is it all just a matter of opinion?
Thank you in advance...
 

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A lot of people wait until they mature more and at six month there no where mature. So if you can wait I would!

My Jack is 4 years old and never been neutered and I never ever had a problem with him marking anything or any behavioral issues, in fact Jack loves all the ones I brought in so far..he's the oldest. He was a perfect mom to Chloe and Sadie!

That said, try to wait, let him get his big head...lol, just kidding.
 

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I waited two and half to get fixed I would of waited 3years but I have a alpha male from litter the other and another brother no problem with dogs but alpha one started going after other dogs that were not fixed and biting sruff and shaking other dogs.

head will not grow out as big as it should if you fix him early

once a problem with him starts you will know its time
 

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Kirsten and Whiskey
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Discussion Starter #6
I waited two and half to get fixed I would of waited 3years but I have a alpha male from litter the other and another brother no problem with dogs but alpha one started going after other dogs that were not fixed and biting sruff and shaking other dogs.

head will not grow out as big as it should if you fix him early

once a problem with him starts you will know its time

If a problem does develop, once he is neutered and the hormones are out of his system, will it stop?
 

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I waited two and half to get fixed I would of waited 3years but I have a alpha male from litter the other and another brother no problem with dogs but alpha one started going after other dogs that were not fixed and biting sruff and shaking other dogs.

head will not grow out as big as it should if you fix him early

once a problem with him starts you will know its time
The head will not grow out if you fix early? That is how all of those males end up with such big and gorgeous block heads????
 

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The head will not grow out if you fix early? That is how all of those males end up with such big and gorgeous block heads????
Not always but sometimes that is the case. I know I have seen it with my dogs who go back strongly to some of the East Coast lines. And especially in one little guy who was fixed at 4 months-against my strong objections. The difference between him and his littermates not at age 3 is amazing-he has no rib spring, is very tall and gangly, and has a very narrow head. He hardly looks the same breed as his littermates, let alone from the same litter. He is a real sweetie though, just like his littermates and parents.

Of course, to get a nice head, it has to be in the genetics in the first place. Same with nice coat and good bone.
 

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Not always but sometimes that is the case. I know I have seen it with my dogs who go back strongly to some of the East Coast lines. And especially in one little guy who was fixed at 4 months-against my strong objections. The difference between him and his littermates not at age 3 is amazing-he has no rib spring, is very tall and gangly, and has a very narrow head. He hardly looks the same breed as his littermates, let alone from the same litter. He is a real sweetie though, just like his littermates and parents.

Of course, to get a nice head, it has to be in the genetics in the first place. Same with nice coat and good bone.
Cody's breeder suggested waiting until 10-12 months at least, for the reasons above. When I talked to the vet she agreed that this sometimes happens, so we will have Cody fixed at 12 months.
 

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Even if you are not going to participate in agility or other dog sports with your golden, please visit the following link, it is written by a vet that owns dogs and participates in all sorts of dog sports--it talks about the advantages of, if you are going to neuter your dog, to do it later, due to growth plate development and other canine structural considerations:

http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html

I'm sure your breeder is aware of this, and that is why the later age was recommended. I neutered by first golden at age 2--he was sold as a "pet quality" and he still reminded the same outgoing, lively dog after surgery that he was before.
 

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Not always but sometimes that is the case. I know I have seen it with my dogs who go back strongly to some of the East Coast lines. And especially in one little guy who was fixed at 4 months-against my strong objections. The difference between him and his littermates not at age 3 is amazing-he has no rib spring, is very tall and gangly, and has a very narrow head. He hardly looks the same breed as his littermates, let alone from the same litter. He is a real sweetie though, just like his littermates and parents.

Of course, to get a nice head, it has to be in the genetics in the first place. Same with nice coat and good bone.
I don't understand the part about the East Coast Lines and how that fits into the block heads. The puppy I am looking at has a lot of Nautilus in him. What does that mean for him? When I look at the Beechwood Goldens they have amazing block heads.
 

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I don't know why, but the difference seemed to show up more in my litters with a strong east coast influence. The first time I really noticed it was in my Hi Speed Chase litter, which was many years ago. The pets, all of which were spayed/neutered by 6 months of age, did not resemble their intact litter mates at all. A friend of mine had a boarding kennel and made the comment to me that they were not at all attractive and did not look like show lines at all-narrow heads, long thin legs, etc. It took me a long time to figure out why, since as puppies there was not such a difference in them.

The more recent puppy also has some east coast lines in him, going back through Pebwin. And he was neutered far far too early in my opinion, at 4 months.

Both these litters were very slow maturing, which probably has a good bit to do with it as well.

In the case of males, I don't see any reason generally to be in a rush to neuter. I think it is much better to wait until they are 15 months or older, which gives them a chance to physically mature.
 

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I don't know why, but the difference seemed to show up more in my litters with a strong east coast influence. The first time I really noticed it was in my Hi Speed Chase litter, which was many years ago. The pets, all of which were spayed/neutered by 6 months of age, did not resemble their intact litter mates at all. A friend of mine had a boarding kennel and made the comment to me that they were not at all attractive and did not look like show lines at all-narrow heads, long thin legs, etc. It took me a long time to figure out why, since as puppies there was not such a difference in them.

The more recent puppy also has some east coast lines in him, going back through Pebwin. And he was neutered far far too early in my opinion, at 4 months.

Both these litters were very slow maturing, which probably has a good bit to do with it as well.

In the case of males, I don't see any reason generally to be in a rush to neuter. I think it is much better to wait until they are 15 months or older, which gives them a chance to physically mature.
I will be waiting to neuter for sure! I was just looking at the lines of the litter we are considering. Mom is a Clipper pup and Dad is 95% Nautilus.
 

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If a problem does develop, once he is neutered and the hormones are out of his system, will it stop?

Logan is about 85% better only now if a dog that has no confidence he goes after or boxers,huskys but last two times at dog park he ran over dogs but did not attack

this was 2 months after neutering now bin 4-5 months should try to see how he is now

but one problem is when with his brother likes to gang up together

problem started around 1 year couple months, I banned him from dog parks stuck with bruce trails until he turned 2 and half

so I waited a year after he started thinking he was top dog

yours might be alright some dogs are not fighters, but you have to watch out older dogs might attack him cause he,s not fixed(smell)

Logan got attack couple times when 10 months - year old
 

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I see a big difference in Jack compared to Chewie, Jack has a big head and is very muscular still intact at 4 years old, Chewie was a rescue (someone on this forum needed new home for him), he was 7 month when I got him and already neutered..he has a much smaller header, skinny, gangly legs.

Big Difference in those two!
 

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Timber's breeder requested we wait to neuter him until he was between 14 and 16 months if possible.
He's almost 9 months now and no problems so far. He does feel the need to lift his leg on every tree we pass but that's OK.
He plays regularly with a 1 1/2 yr old neutered golden and they are best of buds. Neither plays the alpha roll - that is saved for the 1 yr female golden they play with :)
 

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Tucker is 14 months old and is still intact and will be until he is at least 18 months old. We are in no rush to neuter him. We have had absolutely no behavioral problems with him being intact this long and he has never once marked inside of the house or even tried to hump anything or anyone. He's never around any bitches in heat, so that's not an issue for us. We keep in touch with someone who has one of Tucker's littermates and they had him neutered when he was only about 7 months old. There is a huge difference in the two boys physically. Tucker has developed a much larger and blockier head, a wider chest, and just overall looks more blocky and muscular than his brother, who is much lankier and has a narrower head. The only way you can even tell that they are related is that they are the same color. Other than that, they look completely different from each other.

Our vet also tried to convince us that we should neuter Tucker when he was around 6 months old, but we were adamant on waiting until he is beteween 18 and 24 months old. I am very glad that we have waited this long, especially after seeing the difference between Tucker and his brother who was neutered at a much younger age. Our plan is the same for our second male golden that we are getting this winter. After doing literally hours of research, I really do believe that it is much more beneficial to the dog to wait until they are older. Our breeder also recommends waiting until 18-24 months.
 
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