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My sister recently gave me her three year old golden retriever. I am taking him in a couple of weeks to get neutered. Some people have told me he would get fat and that his personality would change. The vet also told me that it would eliminate the risk of testicular cancer and I think prostate cancer. What is everyone's opinion about neutering?
 

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Kate
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It will eliminate the risk of testicular cancer (very rare cancer), but not prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is more common in neutered dogs.

I have no idea on fatness or personality <= My guess is that if a dog's in a home that would allow him to get fat (overfeeding, not enough exercise), he will get fat whether he has gonads or not. Big issue about letting your dogs get fat - is it increases potential for cancer.

People believe, thanks to their vets, that the best fix for an edgy/aggressive dog is neutering him. Vs putting the training and management work in. This leads to a higher likelihood of neutered dogs exhibiting aggressive behavior and attacking other dogs.

Primary negative effect of neutering too early is the dog's coat turns to crap. Basically. You have extra thick, soft and silky (bad - means it will be prone to matting) and crazy coats on these dogs - nothing that nature or breeding ever intended.
 

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Spaying/neutering used to be a kind of knee-jerk reaction for pet owners: get a pet, have it spayed/neutered. This is no longer the case, largely due to research showing that spaying/neutering, especially early in the pet's life, has an impact on the likelihood of certain cancers and certain types of injuries (ACL tears, etc.).


Is there a specific reason why you want to neuter your dog at 3 years of age?


To answer your question: dogs don't get fat because they're neutered, they get fat because they're fed too much and aren't given enough exercise. In addition, your dog's personality is unlikely to change. However, his coat might. Neutered dogs often grow thicker coats (fluffier undercoat) that are more prone to matting. If you neuter your dog, you should be prepared for more grooming.


FWIW, I have an intact 2-year-old male and don't intend to neuter him unless there's a compelling reason to do so.
 

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My dog was neutered a couple of months ago because of a testicular tumor which turned out to be a seminoma.

Testicular tumors have low metastatic rates.

My boy is 12 and so far, so good. As far as testicular tumors go, just do regular checks to catch them early.
 
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