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Are you for or against? Please state your reasons why also. Both medical and behavioural reasons
Thanks !
Also tips on the best way to discipline your dog for excessive barking!
 

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Puddles
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It would help to know how old the dog is :) But in general I'm not a big fan of neutering unless it's for health issues (and after the age of 2) and certainly isn't going to help with excessive barking if this is your line of thought.
Excessive barking is usually a training issue and a build up of energy. So are you training? Involved in classes? How much exercise is your dog getting?
 

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Barking= training .
Teach dog a signal for bark, then one for no bark. Keep dog well-exercised and mentally stimulated.
Neutering- surgical neutering increases the risk of prostate tumors by 2.4-4.3 times depending on your study ... and neutering decreases the odds of impregnanting a bitch 100%.
Don't believe w training that peeing inappropriately or aggression are factors swayed by surgically altering an animal.
 

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Big fan of vasectomy. Keeps the testosterone but eliminates the risk of unwanted litters.
 

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Spaying will reduce the possibility of Pyrometra in females.

Neutering will reduce the risk of testicular and Prostate cancer in Males.
Male dogs have no idea what "cool" is, so losing the family jewels is a non event.



In both cases, the neutered dogs will not have to bear the pain of not being able to mate.
 

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Unless a person is absolutely sure their dog won't get loose, I'm for it.



Teach the dog to bark. Then teach the dog not to bark.
 

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According to my vet, the risk of testicular or prostate cancer is so low that even increasing it 100% keeps it very, very low. Neutering doesn't increase it 100% in any case.
Neutering does, however, increase the risk of hemangiosarcoma and osteosarcoma, both of which are quite common to begin with.


For!
Spaying will reduce the possibility of Pyrometra in females.

Neutering will reduce the risk of testicular and Prostate cancer in Males.
Male dogs have no idea what "cool" is, so losing the family jewels is a non event.



In both cases, the neutered dogs will not have to bear the pain of not being able to mate.
 

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A dog who has had a vasectomy won't cause an unwanted litter even if he does get loose....

Unless a person is absolutely sure their dog won't get loose, I'm for it.



Teach the dog to bark. Then teach the dog not to bark.
 

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Different vets have different opinions. My vet says otherwise.

My young Golden is too precious to lose to Pyrometra, and she will be spayed at about 1.5 yrs old..depending on her development.

Hopefully we all do what's best for the dogs and not for ourselves.
 

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A dog who has had a vasectomy won't cause an unwanted litter even if he does get loose....

A vasectomy is a terrific option, but will the dog still be motivated to seek out a female in heat? My only point is that people need to be totally honest with themselves when making this decision. If there's a reasonable risk that the dog can escape, I favor neutering. If someone can honestly say that the chance their dog can get loose is remote, then absolutely a vasectomy is a good solution.
 

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My 3-year-old dog is not neutered and won't be unless there's a compelling medical reason to do so. However, it's important to point out that having an intact dog comes with some responsibilities. First of all, you have to manage the dog properly. And you have to be aware that even if your dog has the nicest temperament in the world, certain other dogs (usually neutered males) will not like him because he's intact. You will need to choose his friends carefully: certainly don't take him to a dog park, for example, because the likelihood that he'll get into a fight is a lot higher than if he was neutered. My guy is about the most mellow and kind dog you could wish to meet, but there is one dog (a neutered male border collie) in our extended agility community that absolutely hates him and has tried on several occasions to attack him. That dog's owner also manages him closely and is very careful not to have him off-leash when we're around. There are others, too, that react negatively to him, although not to such an extent as the border collie.
 

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Spaying will reduce the possibility of Pyrometra in females.

Neutering will reduce the risk of testicular and Prostate cancer in Males.
Male dogs have no idea what "cool" is, so losing the family jewels is a non event.



In both cases, the neutered dogs will not have to bear the pain of not being able to mate.
Cutting off your foot will reduce the chance of you getting cancer in your foot. But does that make it a good idea?
 

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Pyometra is a whole different issue from testicular or prostate cancer. Also, the health issues caused by spay haven't been as statistically significant as those caused by neuter.
That said, there are people now promoting ovary sparing spay procedures, which I tend to agree with.

Different vets have different opinions. My vet says otherwise.

My young Golden is too precious to lose to Pyrometra, and she will be spayed at about 1.5 yrs old..depending on her development.

Hopefully we all do what's best for the dogs and not for ourselves.
 

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Spaying will reduce the possibility of Pyrometra in females.

Neutering will reduce the risk of testicular and Prostate cancer in Males.
Male dogs have no idea what "cool" is, so losing the family jewels is a non event.



In both cases, the neutered dogs will not have to bear the pain of not being able to mate.
Actually neutering INCREASES the chances for the boys of prostate tumors. Obviously the testicles are not there so yeah- it def reduces odds of that.
https://www.cuvs.org/sites/default/files/inline-files/1-4 Bentley Thalheim - SpayNeuter.pdf

Surgical castration also increases the odds of several very common cancers.

Girls otoh- spay them after one cycle. Pyo is too dangerous.
 

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Different vets have different opinions. My vet says otherwise.

My young Golden is too precious to lose to Pyrometra, and she will be spayed at about 1.5 yrs old..depending on her development.

Hopefully we all do what's best for the dogs and not for ourselves.
These are not things for opinion- they are just proven statistics. I agree w you on the spay. NOT on the removal of testicles. When we 'hope to do the best' we must do the research and decide what the best actually is. Veterinarians don't know people can be trusted to keep a dog from breeding (which holds more risks than just more puppies in the world) so like most things, this is a blanket approach- a herd approach. It's not scientifically verifiable though...and if your vet says that removing testicles reduces odds of prostate tumors, either he is not keeping up or he is misleading his clients, or the clients are mishearing what he is advising.
 

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Pyometra is a whole different issue from testicular or prostate cancer. Also, the health issues caused by spay haven't been as statistically significant as those caused by neuter.
That said, there are people now promoting ovary sparing spay procedures, which I tend to agree with.
I was looking into this before and thought this was the answer for me and my dog but with my vet who is one of the top surgeons in my area and also donates time at u of Penn said that if ANY of the uterus is left behind (the uterine stump) the same risk for pyometria is basically the same. This means you could do the ovary sparring spay procedure and down the road still have to do the full spay procedure. So we thought why the risk of 2 surgeries. We decided it was best to leave Maggie intact and just watch for signs of pyometria. Which she said wasn't that prevalent. Some studies show just 2.2 to 4% occurrence in intact females.

So the ovary sparring spay is still a decision to be made individually. I don't think it's the answer for everyone.
 

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As always, there are alot of opinions on this: Note the tidbit on neutering and prostate cancer)


Pyometra: Why You Should Spay Sooner Than Later



Unfortunately, just like in human medicine; what was "fact" once, becomes fiction later ...ie: humans eating eggs..Margarine is healthier than butter..etc etc. Fact is always fact..until dis-proven later!



If anyone here is old enough to remember the highly touted Thalidomide in the 50's ; that was another disaster with deadly results.

Being on guard ALWAYS is the best practice.



My vet is a WSU grad and returns twice yearly for updates. She is only in her early 40's but is the #2 surgeon at the practice. The owner is #1 of course.
I trust their opinions as educated ones and to date, have not been disappointed
 

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We have no difference on the spays/pyos.
it is the neuters that our info differs on. Every veterinarian must do CE- the doing of it doesn't make them better than or more knowledgeable. You might ask what lectures and wet labs your vet did for her CE last year, or look up the choices which are varied and interesting.
No where is there evidence that removing testicles does anything besides increase odds for cancer of the prostate. FWIW- I imagine of my three scenarios by which the vet's info might point to less cancer of the prostate in a neuter- I suspect it is the client's interpretation of what was said .. not that the vet doesn't know what they're talking about.
 
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