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Greetings and Thank You for This Forum.

Our Nani girl had what I know to be her 2nd seizure this morning - she's fine now - why I say "What I know to be" is because it's the 2nd seizure we've witnessed. The first one happened at about a year old - she's now five.

I've read some of the great info on this forum - but I'm beginning to think maybe she's epileptic - only because she doesn't lose control of her bowels - just stiffens up and foams at the mouth, jerks & her eyes also roll in their sockets like REM sleep while the seizure is happening - they last about a minute or so. Her Vet has checked her out and says to just keep a close eye on her for the next day or so - since they are so far apart - he asked that we keep a log of her behavior for the next several days. If we see any further issues then we are to bring her back in. He did not prescribe any medications at this time.

I took Nani off flea meds after the 1st seizure 4 years ago - I have used just a mix of ACV and a few drops of lavender essential oils and water as a flea spray which works for her. she is very active - eats only home-cooked chicken and fresh veges twice a day now (used to be 3x per day) she's a lean loving (not mean) eating machine lol. She happens to be my Husband's support buddy - he is partially blind and fully disabled. So this is particularly difficult for both of them We're praying she'll not continue with the episodes but we'll certainly do what we need to do for her medically to keep this under control IF it does continue.

If anyone knows of specific differences between epileptic and grand mal seizures in dogs - specifically Goldens - I'd sure appreciate your input.

Thank you All
Nani's Mommy Karen
 

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Welcome to the seizure forum. I'm so very sorry that you and Nani are going through this.

I will share a few thoughts from my experience with two beloved Goldens who had seizures. I did a lot of research trying to understand what was happening. At some point, I started this forum, largely in memory of Charlie, whose story is chronicled in the thread titled "Seizures Starting at 12 Years Old." A lot of what I have written here comes from experiences with him.

"Epilepsy" is simply another word for a seizure disorder. There are multiple kinds of seizures, including "grand mal" seizures. It sounds like your Nani may be having "focal" or "partial" seizures, which are much less violent and terrifying than grand mal seizures. Charlie had them later in his disease process, in addition to clusters of grand mal seizures.

The neurologist we took Charlie to recommended Zonisamide to control focal seizures and it worked well for my boy. If you search the GRF for "zonisamide," you will find a few threads about it. Zonisamide and other seizure meds can be quite expensive, but there are some strategies to get the cost down. You might start with a visit to GoodRx.com, which has a search feature to show you prices for medications and various pharmacies in your area. They also offer coupons and a free GoodRx card that many pharmacies offer; some - but not all - honor the GoodRx prices for dogs.

My research has told me that seizures that start late in a dog's life, like Charlie's, probably result from a brain tumor or other brain lesions. Typically we provide what is essentially hospice care for them, keeping them safe and as comfortable as we can for as long as we can. Typically idiopathic epilepsy, which means seizures of unknown origin, begins around age 4 or 5, so that may well be the diagnosis for Nani. If so, please know that Nani can have a long and fairly normal life, though her needs will require a lot from you to keep her safe.

Keeping a journal is a good practice for anyone with a seizure dog. You should note the date, time of day, duration of the seizures and what the dog did during the seizure. It's also good to note what food Nani ate, any meds taken or applied, and anything that changed in the household such as cleaning products, carpeting, and so on. You are looking for patterns and possible "triggers" that cause seizures. Some dogs have food allergies that cause seizures and there are many reports of seizures in response to flea and tick medications, though there are some that are safer than others.

Please ask any questions you have as you go through this. I have not been on the GRF much recently, but I am notified when there are posts to this forum and I will come back to you. There are many other people here with seizure dogs and this has always been a very supportive community.

Good luck with Nani.

Lucy
 
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