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First it was the poor counter surfing doggies. Now I've declared war on ALL pets on the counters!

After my folks lost their cat, they had no more use for the indoor "fence" that worked with my dogs' invisible fence collars so they gave it back. I had the brilliant idea to put it in the kitchen to block access to most of the countertops. I might have a middle aged red demon that would steal anything off the counter or out of the sink. The transmitter has made life soooo much easier with her.

I had been worrying a bit about how I was going to keep the cats out of the baby's room once s/he is born (more because I don't want to take any chances with a cat inappropriately urinating rather than fear for the child). After the sucess with the dogs' collars and indoor transmitter I decided to try one of the new indoor transmitters that my fence company makes. Luckily they do not "speak" to the dogs' collars (and the dogs' transmitter don't "speak" cat). I just bought one to begin with and put it on the cat that likes to sleep ON the stove. He hasn't been on there in a week! So I went ahead and bought 4 more. I just got them today and fit all the cats with their collars. So far so good, they need a little bit more learning before I call it a sucess, but it looks good! So no more cats on the counters. No cats in the baby's room. I can even set the old cat's collar to a different frequency and put her food bowl by a transmitter set to the other cats' frequency to let her eat more food which she needs (the other transmitters are set to both frequencies).

I was worried the collars would be too big for cats (my cats are in the 7-10# range, or at least they *should* be!). But the transmitter with the PawzAway only weighs and ounce and in no way looks too big on any of my cats. There isn't any training with this either since there is no worry about the pet learning to "run through" the shock accross a fence (maybe you'd need to train if you were using it to block a doorway). I was surprised when the training section of the booklet says to just put the collar on and let the pet learn. And I was even more surprised how well that worked!

Sorry this is so long (I am pretty excited about the whole thing) and sorry to anyone that doesn't agree with the whole shock thing (I shocked myself before I put it on the cats and it didn't really hurt).
 

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No longer have cats, but mine used to like to climb on the dining room table, eat the flowers, then puke on th table. However, I am taking care of my Granddog Kady and she is a counter surfing throwback to her great grandma, Cookie. Last night WHILE I was in the kitchen, she ate half of my dinner. My dogs remained polite!!! Then I shredded cheese for quesadillas and she licked the cheese on me side of the plate. She is shameless. One of the vets I work with teaches his dogs not to go n the kitchen . I was so annoyed tonight that I put one of my PVC ring gates (used for everything but practicing show ring obedience ) to keep all out of the kitchen so I could bake cookies.
 

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I am glad that the collars are working for you. It will save you a lot of trouble later(after the baby is born). The sooner they all learn the more relaxed you can be!!:)
 

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My friend used the same thing to keep her cat out of the dining room because she would urinate in that room. I think they replaced the wood in there three times. It was a good thing that her husband was a builder so they got their materials at cost or nothing at all each time.

I like the idea for the older cat.
 
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