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I have a 3 month old golden retreiver :). wen she was 2 months her front legs started going crooked. when i showed her to the vet he said that i should double the calcium dose and keep her isolated. i tried doing that for over a month but there seems to be little improvement. her legs are getting worse and shes havin problems walking and sometimes even has a small limp :(. please advice. Thank you in advance. Sahan
 

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I'm so sorry to hear your pup is having issues.

I think you are going to have to work with your Vet on this. I don't believe there is anything you, yourself, can do to correct it.

Best wishes to you and your pup!
 

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YIKES!!!! Increasing the calcium is the worst thing you could do! Instead, decrease it, as well as the protein. I'd have her seen by an ortho specialist at this point, if possible. She should not be having gait issues...
 

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YIKES!!!! Increasing the calcium is the worst thing you could do! Instead, decrease it, as well as the protein. I'd have her seen by an ortho specialist at this point, if possible. She should not be having gait issues...
My first reaction, see an orthopedic specialist, and soon.
 

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I have to agree-I can't imagine even giving a baby Golden calcium supplements, let alone increasing the amount!

What are you feeding her?

Some things are normal, such as going down on pastern when teething, and even, depending on the background, going east-westy in front. Pano is also a possibility, as are other growth and development issues.

If it is really bad-and if it is affecting her walk and is very noticeable, it sure sounds bad-I agree, you should have her looked at by a vet who specializes in orthopedics.

What does your breeder say about the issue?

Can you post a picture?
 

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I agree with the others. Take her off the calcium suppliments and have your vet give you a referral to a orthopedic vet. Hopefully it is going to be ok.
 

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Holy smokes, it's hard to believe a vet wanted to increase her calcium. What have you been feeding her? May we see pictures? By crooked do you mean the bone itself or the ligaments? Are her toes pointing in or out or do her paws looks like big slippers& she walks on her ankles? We need more info!

There's a disease called HOD that bigger dogs get that reminds me of what you're saying here. Not sure if goldens get it, but Tahnee and PG will probably know that info.

This is what I would do.

Make sure the puppy isnt always on slippery floors.

Give a good vitamin C (esther C) supplement.

Find a very balanced standard large breed puppy food like Eukanuba Large Breed puppy or Innova Large Breed Puppy, or even an adult food with 21-25 percent protien if you see no improvement. Many problems are caused by "overnutrition" or out of whack calicum/ phosphorus.

Feed pup in raised dishes.

I have no personal experience with this at all, but if your pup is down on her pasterns, old timers have a remedy they swear by- Maloxx- I have no idea why though.
 

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Here is some information on HOD. I hope all the links work, as I just found these in my folder and I have had them for awhile

http://www.gdca.org/health/Great Dane 702.pdf

http://www.netpets.org/~sunny/dane_health.html#HOD

http://www.artreality.com/portfolio/wdwork/vet/growingpai
ns.htm

http://www.newmanveterinary.com/lameness.htm

http://amstaff.net/HD1.html

http://www.golden-retriever.com/food.html

http://www.doglogic.com/lgpupdiet.htm

http://www.newmanveterinary.com/large.html#Large Breed Puppies:

I believe Maalox is used if lowering the amount of protein in the food (usually to around 21%) does not provide rapid relief from downed pasterns. I am not familiar with Maalox but I did read somewhere that it contains calcium?

Without pictures, it is so hard to tell anything-is she down on her pasterns? Going east-west? A combination? Is it worse than what one might normally see in a teething puppy?

I still think a visit to an orthopedic vet might be in order.
 

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YIKES!!!! Increasing the calcium is the worst thing you could do! Instead, decrease it, as well as the protein. I'd have her seen by an ortho specialist at this point, if possible. She should not be having gait issues...
I've heard this over and over, and I can't figure it out. Giant breed owners have known for years that these bone curvature problems can be caused by too much protein and calcium. I can't for the life of me understand why vets are still increasing those values when there's plenty of literature out there that shows that decreasing can eliminate the problems entirely in many cases.
 

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YIKES!!!! Increasing the calcium is the worst thing you could do! Instead, decrease it, as well as the protein. I'd have her seen by an ortho specialist at this point, if possible. She should not be having gait issues...
That's what I was thinking, it thought that was part the thinking behind the LBP formulas...less calcium.
 

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I am curious if there's any scientific reason Maalox might help with down pasterns/ HOD? It is a persistent belief of horse/ dog people here in Maine.
 

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Umm, my Rowdy was down at the pasterns as a pup and was put on calcium supplementation for a while - it did work and he was still running agility at 11 years old.

I think that perhaps it needs to be considered on a case by case basis.
 

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The problem is that some bone issues in a growing dog can be caused by too little calcium and some can be caused by too much. HOD is almost certainly caused by too much. When a dog has downed pasterns but not HOD, it might make sense to add protein and/or calcium. That's why an orthopedic specialist is so important.

So if the OP's dog has curved bones, calcium supplements could be a real problem. If it's downed pasterns, they might help, as they did for Rowdy.

Without pictures or a clearer description, it's hard to tell what's going on.
 

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Umm, my Rowdy was down at the pasterns as a pup and was put on calcium supplementation for a while - it did work and he was still running agility at 11 years old.

I think that perhaps it needs to be considered on a case by case basis.
Not to sound disrespectful, but how do you KNOW the calcium is what worked? Most pups with downed pasterns grow out of it naturally, so conceivably it was coincidental that he got better when you started the calcium.

I'm also curious who put him on the supplements? Your regular vet or an ortho specialist?
 

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Nearly all puppies will go "down at the pasterns" when they are cutting teeth. They will come back up when the teeth are in. There is no way that I would supplement with calcium unless there were some issue specifically diagnosed by an orthopaedic specialist.
 

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I was wondering..
We have rescued/adopted a golden, "Max," form a horrible place that was shut down in and he came with little to no information. My friend took his sister, and I took him. Both "pups," about 4 months old we think: they just finished teething, walk a little funny. They walk almost like they have a hip out of joint. The vet said he was "fine," but the trainer eeps commenting on is funny walk. When he runs, he looks fine, but when he walks, he almost walks sideways. His sister does the same thing. they ay the litter had Parvo, but neither Max nor Lucy got it...I don't know what to think. i think he's a pretty dog, then again, I've always had Lhasa Apsos.hahahaha! Does anybody have any idea what the heck I should do?
 

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I was wondering..
We have rescued/adopted a golden, "Max," form a horrible place that was shut down in and he came with little to no information. My friend took his sister, and I took him. Both "pups," about 4 months old we think: they just finished teething, walk a little funny. They walk almost like they have a hip out of joint. The vet said he was "fine," but the trainer eeps commenting on is funny walk. When he runs, he looks fine, but when he walks, he almost walks sideways. His sister does the same thing. they ay the litter had Parvo, but neither Max nor Lucy got it...I don't know what to think. i think he's a pretty dog, then again, I've always had Lhasa Apsos.hahahaha! Does anybody have any idea what the heck I should do?
Get them x-rayed. It doesn't cost that much and will give you a lot of peace of mind. Hip dysplasia can show up that early if it's bad. Finding out early will give you a lot more options for treatment. And if you find out the hips are OK, that's even better!

Also, they are probably more like 6 months if they just finished teething.
 
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