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Last time here we had just gotten our pupster Rusty. I absolutely love my puppy dog. He's 2.5 now.

Here's our dilemma. I used to walk him with my scooter everyday at least 3-5 miles. We'd go for quite a ways. Anyhoots, about a year ago my scooter stopped working consistently. My wife & I are gonna make it a point to get it in within the month.

So Mr. Rusty's been packing on the lbs. Could some of you folks tell me what your dog's diameter/circumference is at about the middle of his body. Rear of the ribcage in front of his crayon best explains it I guess.
Preferably a male since I think they're naturally bigger.

We know he needs to got on a diet, just how much is our concern for now.

Thank you very much in advance.
 

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Last time here we had just gotten our pupster Rusty. I absolutely love my puppy dog. He's 2.5 now.

Here's our dilemma. I used to walk him with my scooter everyday at least 3-5 miles. We'd go for quite a ways. Anyhoots, about a year ago my scooter stopped working consistently. My wife & I are gonna make it a point to get it in within the month.

So Mr. Rusty's been packing on the lbs. Could some of you folks tell me what your dog's diameter/circumference is at about the middle of his body. Rear of the ribcage in front of his crayon best explains it I guess.
Preferably a male since I think they're naturally bigger.

We know he needs to got on a diet, just how much is our concern for now.

Thank you very much in advance.
I don't know if this helps or not, but I found this "chart" a while ago both with a verbal and pictorial description of "ideal" dog weight. In fact, like the humans, most dogs in the US seem to be slightly overweight. :)

Purina.Com | Dog | Caring | Understanding your Dog's Body Condition
 

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Whoops ... hit send too early ...
here is the verbal description. Go to the url for the pictorial.
Purina.Com | Dog | Caring | Understanding your Dog's Body Condition

Too Thin

1. Ribs, lumbar vertebrae, pelvic bones and all bony prominences evident from a distance. No discernible body fat. Obvious loss of muscle mass.

2. Ribs, lumbar vertebrae and pelvic bones easily visible. No palpable fat. Some evidence of other bony prominence. Minimal loss of muscle mass.

3. Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones becoming prominent. Obvious waist.

Ideal

4. Ribs easily palpable, with minimal fat covering. Waist easily noted, viewed from above. Abdominal tuck evident.

5. Ribs palpable without excess fat covering. Waist observed behind ribs when viewed from above. Abdomen tucked up when viewed.

Too Heavy

6. Ribs palpable with slight excess fat covering. Waist is discernible viewed from above but is not prominent. Abdominal tuck apparent.

7. Ribs palpable with difficulty; heavy fat cover. Noticeable fat deposits over lumbar area and base of tail. Waist absent or barely visible. Abdominal tuck may be present.

8. Ribs not palpable under very heavy fat cover, or palpable only with significant pressure. Heavy fat deposits over lumbar area and base of tail. Waist absent. No abdominal tuck. Obvious abdominal distension may be present.

9. Massive fat deposits over thorax, spine and base of tail. Waist and abdominal tuck absent. Fat deposits on neck and limbs. Obvious abdominal distention.
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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"in front of his crayon" - my first jr.-high-school giggle of the day. :)

Measuring around the middle is probably not the best way to determine if weight is okay...(to many variables where you measure, how tight you pull the measuring tape etc, etc) but to answer you...
My male is 24" and weighs 78 pounds
Both of my girls are 23"...yet the girls weigh 62-65

Do you know how tall your dog is at the shoulder?
If he is 23-24" at the shoulder then his weight should fall into the typical 65-75 pounds.
(holler if you need hints how to get a good measurement)

But if you cant get a good measurement at the shoulder...then the descriptions that the others provided are pretty darn good guide.
 

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Kye & Coops Mom
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My brother was blind and was the best of the best about telling you if your dog was overweight or not. He told me to close my eyes, try to empty my mind and put both hands on the shoulders of the dog. Take a small breath then slowly run my hands down their back and down their sides. If at a good weight with slight pressure you should feel all the ribs and go slow and see if you can count them! This was ideal. If you must use your fingers to probe then the dog was degrees of overweight.

I found I was "litter blind" in that I made mental excuses for excess weight in my dogs. Honestly my brother helped me to not "see" them, but feel them with my inner eyes and was really a good way to be honest and get the extra pounds off.

He could also tell if slightly overweight by their breathing after a walk. Said he could hear a more labored breath with an overweight dog. Guy had a lot of "horse" sense on our dogs for sure and was always right. I try to follow this especially with dogs with heavy coats which can hide a lot of pounds. Sometimes using your hands and not your eyes can give you a better idea of an ideal weight.
 
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