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where the tails wag
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Be very careful with this article.

My dogs are routinely tested (twice a year)and ARE treated when they show more than exposure. I honestly cannot recall any of my dogs becoming symptomatic (possibly they have been but not apparent)

However, it is not uncommon for renal failure to be the first apparent symptom in our goldens. This is so not worth taking a chance and not treating or testing.

Granted, I live in CT but please do not take chances with Lyme Disease. People can also have debilitating symptoms with Lyme Disease.

I do not mean to sound a useless alarm, but we in the northeast generally take Lyme very, very seriously.
 

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We are probably going to have to put Chloe on tick medicine when we move. My parents had dinner with the new neighbors and she said the ticks are so bad over there. My dad wants to treat the yard for ticks once the grass goes in. My mom does not. Do any of you treat your yard for ticks? We stopped having the lawn fertilized when Jake got cancer.
 

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I'm with Sunrise on this. If you live in an area where ticks are a problem, it's not something to be taken lightly. I know personally of several cases where dogs have died from complications from Lyme, or have had serious and permanent sequels, enough to have to abandon their agility career. I also have one friend and several acquaintances who have been extremely sick with Lyme: my friend was hospitalized for two months. It's a bad idea to roll the dice with this particular problem.
 

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It's always good to share the info. Tick's are carrying more then just Lymes disease. There is erlichia, at least two types. Plus a new one recently discovered that can affect the heart. Kidney failure can be caused by ticks also. I lost my 2nd Golden to premature kidney failure. Most likely it was was caused by ticks according to my vet at the time. My last Golden,Skye, had a Lyme's vaccination at a young age with boosters as needed. She ALWAY tested positive for Lymes but NEVER was symptomatic. I was lyme positive for a year and never knew it. Never felt it either. Some people get Lyme's and can't get out of bed for a week.

Never ignore the tick. They are bad and they are everywhere in the northeast.

dlm ny country
 

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Ingrid, Now Mom to Brisby
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Discussion Starter #6
Be very careful with this article.

My dogs are routinely tested (twice a year)and ARE treated when they show more than exposure. I honestly cannot recall any of my dogs becoming symptomatic (possibly they have been but not apparent)

However, it is not uncommon for renal failure to be the first apparent symptom in our goldens. This is so not worth taking a chance and not treating or testing.

Granted, I live in CT but please do not take chances with Lyme Disease. People can also have debilitating symptoms with Lyme Disease.

I do not mean to sound a useless alarm, but we in the northeast generally take Lyme very, very seriously.
I absolutely agree with you. This is why running a SNAP - 4Dx is very important. I have these run at minimum twice/year for Brisby and more if she has had a tick attach after the appropriate period.

What the above article does point out is:

...So if your dog is bitten by a tick, it’s only 33% likely to carry the potentially harmful Borrelia bacteria.


If the tick is infected, then you or your dog will typically develop flu-like symptoms and possibly a rash at the site of infection. This is the first stage of Lyme disease.


Dr Rau and other researchers estimate that only 10 to 20 percent of tick bites will lead to stage 1 Lyme disease.


If untreated however, 30% of stage 1 cases will lead to stage 2 (where bacteria can infect the skin, joints, kidneys and sometimes the heart).


So your dog has about a 1% to 2% chance of stage 2 Lyme disease … the kind of Lyme disease that can really make him sick.


Stage 3 Lyme is the chronic stage, which can appear months or even years after infection. The most common symptoms are joint and muscle pain.


Only 1% of stage 2 cases of Lyme progress to stage 3.
Also, if the SNAP - 4Dx is lyme positive, it does not mean that the dog has Lyme disease.


...

According to Meryl P. Littman, VMD, Dipl. ACVIM, at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine, canine exposure to Lyme disease is common, but the disease is not:
“Ninety-five percent of exposed dogs don’t get sick, but they become Lyme antibody-positive on tests, which may scare people into thinking they need to be treated,” she says. “We don’t treat asymptomatic dogs, but we check their urine for protein. In some areas in New England, 70 to 90 percent of healthy dogs are Lyme-positive. At PennVet, we found about 40 percent of healthy dogs are Lyme-positive in our area.”
Again, these are not sick dogs but dogs that have been exposed to the disease.


It’s clear from these statistics the immune systems of seropositive dogs have identified the Lyme disease pathogen and mounted an appropriate, effective response. So even though they test positive, they do not become sick with the disease..........
We’ve established that 95 percent of dogs exposed to Lyme disease never get sick from it. These dogs will, however, test positive for years down the road.


Hopefully your dog, if infected, will fall into that large group.


But if your pup winds up one of the five percent that becomes ill with Lyme symptoms, I recommend you have your vet run a SNAP-4Dx blood test. Dogs that test positive for Lyme disease with the 4Dx test are typically symptomatic. This test actually detects multiple vector-borne diseases, not just Lyme disease, so it can be useful to rule in or rule out certain other types of bacteria and parasites as well.


Your vet may also do a urinalysis to find out if your dog is excreting protein in her urine.


If the doctor determines your pet’s symptoms are indeed from a Lyme infection, treatment with the antibiotic doxycycline should be instituted.


In a very small percentage of dogs with active Lyme infection – much smaller than the five percent that show symptoms – chronic Lyme disease can result in significant kidney problems and also autoimmune polyarthritis. The latter is a type of joint degeneration secondary to an undiagnosed, untreated Lyme infection.


If you suspect your pet has symptoms of Lyme disease, it’s important to have him seen by a veterinarian.
Lyme Disease in Dogs: Signs, Symptoms, and Prevention
 

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3 goldens
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Five years ago we lost a member from this forum, Debbie B. to Lymes. She didn't post a lot on here, but we had farms on Farmville, etc on Fscebook and we use to chat a lot there as we had much the same background...use to share pictures of our families when we were growing up. Her golden was named Takoda, and she even had a page for him on FB, Takodabod. Her death took me by total surprise. She never complained tho I have learned since she was very sick.

RIP Debbie.
 

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I agree that you should consider this article as just one view and not the definitive answer on Lymes. Interestingly the research that was cited included the work of a Swiss doctor. I would question whether the problem in Switzerland is the same as ours in the Northeast where Lymes is very prevalent. The research at Penn that was cited talked about Lymes in beagles. I think it's widely known that Lyme nephritis is most prevalent in Labs and Goldens and is fatal in a very high percentage of cases. While Lyme nephritis is supposed to be very rare, I know of a number of people in the Northeast who have lost what appeared to be healthy dogs to it. Despite intensive treatment it took our Zoe in 6 weeks from when she first seemed ill. She was only 5 1/2 years old. Her picture is on the left in my signature.
 

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The other thing to be aware of is that Goldens are very stoic dogs, and may not show any readily apparent symptoms.
When Tito was diagnosed with Lyme (by University of Michigan full tick panel, not SNAP test), I felt that he had no symptoms. But after a couple of days on doxy, I realized that in hindsight, he did in fact have a very vague symptom...because after a couple of days on doxy he was much more energetic.
 

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Penny has a lyme vaccine because it's something I was worried about.

I took Penny hiking last summer and found a deer tick on my leg, and had to take treatment to prevent Lyme disease. I knew someone who was greatly weakened by it.
 

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Dr. Rainheart
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IMO, anything posted by that website should be taken with a grain of salt.
 
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