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Well, as I suspected our kitty Tess (17 yr old) has stage 2 kidney failure. She tested normal last year this time. She now is on prescription food, which she seems to eat. She still has a good appetite, but is so so with peeing in the litter box. We will keep her as long as she is comfortable, and eating, drinking and doing all of the normal kitty things. Any one have some advice on what to expect, or how to deal with this? I am still digging thru the info on the web...
Thanks in advance.
 

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Angel Gage's Grandma
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I am sorry to hear about your kitty. When my dog Casey was diagnosed with kidney failure, he was put on Science Diet KD food, which he refused to eat. So my vet gave me a recipe to make for him (rice, vegetables, lean ground turkey or beef), calcitriol pills and eventually subcutaneous fluids. He lived far longer than she expected him to -- 18 months from time of diagnosis. The key was low protein diet, the pills to help control the build-up of calcium in his kidneys (I think) and fluids to help flush the toxins away.
 

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Mom to 9 :)
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Please research and ask your vet about azodyl. I credit azodyl for giving me additional time with JC, my sheltie. It is non-prescription and can be ordered on-line but has to be refrigerated.

This is the general description for it:

Azodyl Renal Function Support Through Enteric Dialysis.

Azodyl Caps helps to slow down uremic toxin buildup and prevent further kidney damage in dogs and cats. It is a breakthrough in veterinary product. It works by providing natural Enteric Dialysis through the use of beneficial bacteria that support kidney function.

The treatment choice at the first signs of azotemia in dog and cats with acute or chronic kidney disease.
Patented formula of naturally-occurring beneficial bacteria that metabolize and flush out uremic toxins that have diffused into the bowel as a result of increased toxin levels in the blood.
Easy-to-administer, enteric-coated capsules.
Can be used with other treatments and/or products, such as Epakitin.
Animals weighing up to 5 lbs: Give 1 capsule Daily
Animals 5-10 Lbs give: Give 2 capsule daily (1 capsule AM and 1 capsule PM)
Animals weighing greater than 10 lbs: Give 3 capsules daily (2 capsule AM and 1 capsule PM)

Capsules should be given whole and not opened/crushed. If necessary administer capsules with a piece of the animals favorite food or treat.

I have found that some vets don't think it does any good, some don't know anything about it, and some (like my vet) advised that he had some good results with it and encouraged me to use along with diet and epakatin.
 

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I am sorry that your kitty Tess has kidney failure. Dont have any advice but I hope you have a long time left with her. That information that Terry has given you hopefully wil help her.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone for the support. jealous1- thanks for the tip on azodyl. I will check it out. It looks promising. Just a little sad right now about kitty. Just trying to find what we can expect in the coming days, and how long we may have left, so we are prepared. Not sure if I will tell the boys just yet, no need for them to worry about her until there is more of a visible decline.
 

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Oh Ken I am so sorry to hear this. As a cat lover (and owner of three) I know how difficult this must be. I have no idea how to help, but it looks like you may have gotten some good advice already. Keeping Tess in my thoughts.
 

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It's just an illusion ...
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I would consult a good holistic vet
I often read about cat nutritional experts being totally against feeding dry food to cats, any type of dry food, as it causes chronic dehydration leading to such diseases.

Here is a book that comes highly recommended
Author Dr Elizabeth Hodgkins
http://www.amazon.com/Your-Cat-Simple-Secrets-Stronger/dp/0312358016/ref=sr_1_1/102-8376217-3546518?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1176526349&sr=8-1#reader


And some links that should be of interest
http://www.catinfo.org/

http://www.holisticvetlist.com/


Don't give up, Tess
I've seen drastic diet changes/supplements work miracles on humans with advanced stage diseases
There's no reason why it wouldn't work for Kitty or Fido
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks T&T, I will check into it. The vet was actually optimistic today when I went back to buy food. Considering Tess is 17, and that her levels are just borderline at this point, she feels that the change in diet will help. But, after all, we still need to consider that she is 17, and at this point, every day is a gift. But knowing Tess, she won't be giving up easy. We will just spoil her for her remaining days....
 

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I also have an almost 17 yr old cat. What were the signs that she had? I always worry about my kitty too, she drinks a lot of water and also doesn't always pee/poop in litter box and I just thought it was that she was getting really picky if the litter wasn't as clean as she liked but when I cleaned it she still peed on the carpet right infront of the bathroom door.
 

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I'm so sorry to hear about kitty.
I just lost my Molson to kidney failure - he was only 7 :(
With him it happened so fast. When he started peeing on my furniture we took him to the vet, found out his kidney's were failing and within 2 weeks we had to send him to the bridge.
The vet figured he must have gotten into something when he was younger and over time his kidney's just gave out. He gave us no signs :(

It sounds like what you are doing so far with kitty is working.
I hope you have many days left with her to love and spoil.
My thoughts are with you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Goldenluver- for us, it was Tess peeing out of the box. She has had a phobia about pooping in the box for years. Even if it was clean. She has had UTI's before, and when she gets them, she tends to pee outside the box. When they tested her for the infection, they also checked her other levels and found that her kidneys were starting to fail. They did find after getting all of her tests back that she also had an infection. She has been using the box since she went on antibotics. I would suggest you take your kitty to the vet- as drinking a lot of water and peeing outside the box can be signs of kidney failure or an UTI. Keep us posted. Glad to share whatever we are going thru with Tess.
 

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I'm so sorry about your kitty. I've only had one who lived to 14 - 15 and I lost him to diabetes so I don't have advice. Just my sincere sympathy. I hope you get many more days to spoil her.
 

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New Mommy
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I just lost my 6th kitty this year to renal failure. She was almost 21 and was diagnosed 3 1/2 years ago, before any of the others actually, who were younger as well. Some of my cats liked Hills K/D, but Hills also make a G/D for early kidney failure. They all seemed to like that better. Purina Vet Diets makes a NR for renal failure that they ate well too.
I am sending you a couple links where you can get great info and the people are very supportive.
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-CRF-Support
http://www.felinecrf.org
Good luck with your kitty!!!
 

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Our 16 y/o kitty is in stage 2 kidney failure as well, diagnosed this June.

Someone asked about signs, and we noticed her peeing outside the litterbox and the vet did a bunch of tests that led to the CRF (chronic renal failure) diagnosis. Other signs she had that we know are CRF signs now are that she drinks a great deal of water and her litterbox "clumps" are about the size of baseballs.

The felinecrf.org site has been invaluable to us, as it goes into the symptoms, what to expect, and treatment options.

Our Sammy won't eat the prescription food, so we are continuing her on our vet-approved wet diet of Wellness foods. She also gets medication every day, Benazapril (we get it in a transdermal applicator; rubbing it on her ear is so much easier than giving a pill). The Benazapril is an ACE inhibitor, but it somehow works to shore up the kidneys. It seems to be helping Sammy.

We took up all of our area rugs and have shut her out of most of the house with baby gates to protect the wall-to-wall carpet from accidents. Most days she seems OK, but there are days when she acts sick, but thankfully those are still few and far between.

Best of luck to you and your kitty! *hugs*
 

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I'm so sorry that Kitty and you are having to go through this. I'll keep you in my prayers.
 

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I am sorry your kitty was diagnosed with kidney disease! It sounds like you found it early, which will bode well for her. I aspire to have a cat who lives to 17 years old! She has obviously been well cared for. The one of mine that probably will is my evil girl. LOL

I have lost two kitties to kidney disease, one was 13 the other was 15. The 13 year old had started losing weight and I took him in. Back then, they didn't really have the foods and meds they have now. He was with me for another 5 months. The 15 year old literally started showing symptoms on a Sunday and I had to have him euthanized 8 days later. His had progressed extremely quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My wife and I often joke about how this pet store kitten is going to out live us all! Looking back, I don't know what possessed us to take her home- from a pet store of all places. We never expected her to live this long. I attribute it to being an indoor kitty, and the fact she sleeps 90% of the day.

She is eating like a champ on the Royal Canin. Guess we will start making up for all those years of Purina Pro Plan from the grocery store.
 
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