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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

We just adopted Molly (was ginger, but didnt know her name) a couple a weeks ago. She is eight months old. She was mainly kept in the basement or garage all day and all night. She is a very quick learner. We got her to sit, lay down and give me paw already. We believe she knows the name Molly too. The problem is, that we would like to have her sleep in the house, because we found out she has hip dysplasia . We cant get her to settle down at night. she constanly jumps up on the bed and bites and nips at our toes. We also try to ignore her and she now has found her voice. She will bark at us. I take her for two walks a day and the kids play ball with her all the time. Also one more is that she is jumping up on the counter in the kitchen, we tell her down and pull her off but as soon as we walk away, she is back up. Also jumps up on the back door. She is not used to having a backyard to run in. I have to walk her around until she gets cofortable.

Thanks for any help.

Amy:)
 

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That is great you adopted her. Do you know her history at all? Did she get any socialization or training?

Shaneamber has experience with rescue and might have some helpful advise.

I would introduce her to the house but with a lot of restrictions at first. She will need obedience training and that will help solve the counter surfing and barking etc.. By keeping her in controlled areas at first you will stop her from developing more bad habits and you can work on the ones she has developed in the last 8 months.

Are you giving her anything for her HD? Do you know the severity of it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for responding. No training what so ever. We believe she spent most of the time in the basement or garage. She didnt get any attention from what i saw when i went to see her. She was very wild. I asked to take her for a walk and when i was around the block, i got her to sit and was able to touch most of her with much licking. All she was lacking was attention. We have looked into having a trainer come to our house. The vet checked her out and both of her hip are affected. He said at this point he thinks we should leave them along. No medicine was prescribed, since she is still so young. He does want to check on her every 3 months.

With some training and guidence, she will be a very great dog.
 

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Hello Amy,Molly is starved for attention.She is afraid that you are only a dream.I'm sure that she will calm down eventually,but in the mean time you need to set some boundaries.I don't like to hit a dog,but some Goldens need to be distracted from what they are doing before they can learn.I sometimes use the finger method to get their attention.You must catch her as she is doing what she shouldn't.
A gentle tap on the snout(in front of the eyes) and then a loud,sharp NO.Just a NO and nothing else.Turn your back for a few seconds(or ignore her) and she will soon understand.Then you will be able to use just the NO to train her.
You must understand that she is still very young and that she has been released from solitary confinement.(Hell for Goldens)Now she wants to see and check out every thing.Molly doesn't want you to sleep,she is trying to make up lost time.
Just remember that she needs time,training and most of all,love.
PS,don't throw a bunch of words at her,just NO,with a stern voice and then pause,give her a chance to understand and comply.
We're here to help anyway we can and this forum is filled with some very smart Golden lovers.If one method doesn't work,try someone else's training system.
Good Luck and remember,PATIENCE.
Shane
 

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I just got my 6 month old Golden. She acted the same since she was caged in a pet shop for I don't know how long....She acts like yours but eventually calms down. She is hyper when I walk her in the early morning after a long night's sleep. I just hold her snout and say NO firmly and she calms down, but sometimes I tolerate her jumping and running around to get some exercise.
 

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Momma to angel Cody
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Amy, you may want to consider crate training her. A crate is not punishment but rather a safe zone (den if you will) for a dog to settle down and chill. It also keeps them out of mischief when you can't have total eyes on the pup. Don't just buy a crate and shove her in it; set it up with the door open, throw random treats in it, have her eat her meals in it and put a cushy pad so it's a cozy nap space. A crate will give her a space of her own, allow her to be inside (where she should be regardless of hip dysplasia) without pacing and keeping everyone awake, and give you a break when you can't watch her. Congratulations on your new family member!!!
 

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Kristen; Buddy's Human
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Going along with what Finn's Fan said, if crate training isn't an option, maybe invest in some baby gates? I got a couple for my puppy and now don't know how I lived without them! It enables me to keep him in one area and ensure he's being good. Most of the books I've read say introduce a dog gradually to an area and they can "earn" extra rooms by being good. Having her gated also helps with the counter surfing, as you can control the areas she's in. It also might (and I'm just assuming here) help with her anxiety, because she'd be constantly closed in to an area near you, and even if she's not, she can see you through the gate.

I know walking might be difficult with her joint issues, but perhaps exercise of some sort would be helpful? Something low-impact, like swimming?? It sounds like she has a lot of nervous energy.

And going off what shaneamber said: I know my best training tool (other than treats) is a can of compressed air. I don't even have to spray it at the dog - just the sound of me pressing the trigger and saying "NO" is usually enough, and if not, a quick little burst (and I do mean LITTLE) stops the behavior. I only had to use the compressed air for a couple days before my dogs learned that "NO" is serious business!
 
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