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We adopted a wonderful 2yo GR girl from local shelter late May, 2008. (We previously adopted 2 GR's from local rescue group with whom we are volunteers, both males and both 2 yo (approximately) at time of adoption. Adopted those guys back in 1992 and 2001 respectively. They came house trained, and signaled when they needed to do their business.

Our 2 yo 'Honey' was not 'fixed' at time of adoption, so we had her spayed right away. Unfortunately she had a complication with the operation, and developed a little bit of bleeding into her abdomen following the operation from sutures not holding properly; which got infected. She has been on antibiotics for 2.5 months, and just go off them last month.

Now for present 'issues'

Apparently Honey was not previously trained well to signal that she needed to go, and we have had numerous 'accidents' since she first came to us in June, 2008.

So we have had her on a regular schedule - walks 6 am, 2 pm, and 10 pm to try to get her on a schedule. She doesnt always poop at night, causing us to worry whether she can hold it till 6 am.

She nudges me around 2-3 am for past 2 weeks (closed door so she wouldnt have accident at place she has peed previously in basement on wall to wall carpet) seemingly signaling she needs to go. As I am afraid of an accident, I take her out, and she usually urinates a little at such ungodly hour.

So, I am up in middle of night to walk her; which interrupts my rest.

We have also been trying to train her to reliably 'come' and 'sit' etc. With various treats. She doesnt not respond regularly to those commands, despite 'fine treats' being offered.

We did not crate our previous 2 dogs, as it was not necessary.

We have a crate from rescue group, for use in transporting when needing to pick up a dog.

Appreciate advice on crating, training a 2 yo sometimes 'stubborn' otherwise wonderful GR lady.

Tx
 

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bumping up for opinions
 

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Well, first of all thank you for rescuing goldens! I would do a few very short sessions of training a day for a while- just a few sits with lots of praise& treats so that she looks forward to working: fun for her and fun for you. For come, play lots of games like Hide N Seek and Post Office(calling her back and forth between people with treats). Dogs form habits so quickly around "out" issues. Maybe you could really tire her out in the last of daylight late in the afternoon, so then she would be sleepy all night? We feed our second meal at 4pm instead of 6 or 7 like we used to just for potty reasons. It made nighttime lots more peaceful with two youngsters. Is she drinking lots of water sometime in the few hours before bed?
 

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Have you had her checked lately for a UTI? If the nudging at night is new maybe that is a possibility.
 

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It really sounds like she was not house trained at all before you got her. With new adoptions it's best to go back and train as if they have never been house trained at all, pretend she is a puppy. Take her out on a schedule, more often than you are now - try to take her out before she needs to go, and encourage her to go potty. Watch and make a note of her timing habits, i.e., what time of day she poops, and begin training her with a specific word for that when goes naturally. Eventually she will go when you tell her to.

Thank you for adopting!
 

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I thoroughly second everything Jill said, both the advice and her thanks for rescuing a Golden.

I'm guessing your pee problem isn't a UTI since she's already on antibiotics, so I'd definitely go for earlier meal times and stop access to water about three hours before bed. You have to be really careful if you're going to do this, but as long as she has good access to water the rest of the day and no serious exercise after the water bowl has been removed, hydration shouldn't be a problem.

Consider crating her at night until she gets past these accidents. Every time she pees in the house, she sets her housebreaking back a little bit. If she's quiet in the crate, you can get a full night's sleep and avoid an accident all at the same time. If she learns that nudging you in the middle of the night gets her a trip outside, she may decide to start doing it whenever she's bored. They are brilliant at learning things like this.

Some dogs aren't as food oriented, so treat/lure training isn't as effective. That isn't necessarily a problem. There's usually something the dog is interested in: toys, high tones of voice, jingling keys, clapping hands, clickers, squeakers, whistling, duck calls, etc. Find something that attracts her interest, something she wants repeated, and use it as the reinforcement. Try those short, frequent training sessions. If the dog loses interest or wanders off, just ignore it and try again later. Negative reinforcement would probably be counterproductive in a dog who came from a stressful life, but you also don't want to be giving commands repeatedly if they're not being obeyed. Dogs learn really fast that they can ignore you if you stand there impotently asking for something that's not happening.

Goldens tend to like games like Post Office for their own sake once they realize they can both run around and please people at the same time. Make training a game for her where it's a party every time she gets something right. If coming is a real problem, go back to long leash training, as if she's a puppy. She may not pick it up as quickly as a puppy would, but she'll pick it up. I tend to favor this solution even with dogs who love treats, since ultimately you want the dog to key into the good feelings and affection that come with the treat. You want treats to be a reinforcement for your affection; you don't want the dog just working for the treat itself.

You'll need patience, a calm attitude, consistency, and creativity, but I'm sure you'll be able to tap into her hard-wired desire to please and to share affection. Good luck, and post some pictures!
 

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UTI is short for uniary track infection. Its something that should always be ruled out in a dog that seems to be peeing more than expected for thier age or unsual frequency of urination. It can make them need to pee more frequently and when they need to go the can need to go NOW(from bladder spasms).
 
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