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I want to start by saying that sharing your post on a GR forum about the quandary you're in, tells me that you DO care about your dog. My Archie is 9-months old (today, actually) and my husband and I have been ACTIVELY training him EVERYDAY since we brought him home at 8-weeks. He is our 1st dog, so we were total newbies to all of this! We researched this forum for a year before we brought him home and we still felt overwhelmed and under-prepared. We were however on the same page with Archie at all times. We also didn't let outside influences, no matter how well meaning, dictate how we were going to train Archie. We are fortunate to have gone, and continue to go to a training center 1x per week for small group instruction (you can also get instruction for free through YouTube videos)... BUT then it is the BOATLOAD of time/work put in on the other 6-days that truly makes the difference. Especially now, during Archie's super BRATTY teenager phase!!! It doesn't sound like Brixley and you and your spouse have done formal training, so that, coupled with his teenage phase and your well intentioned, but uninformed in-laws, is probably why you are at this point. I think if you keep him, you'd need to make intensive training a unified top priority for the next 4-months and then continue to train even after the baby is born.

I am a 63 year-old retired educator with tons of time to make Archie my project! I will be honest, FOR ME, I could not have put in the time and attention it takes to raise a GR puppy into a wonderfully trained 2-year old, (yep, I think it takes that long!), when I was pregnant, or even when my kids were young (I now have 3-adult sons). I know many, many folks do it, I would not have been one of them. I also worked full time, so again FOR ME, anything else that would have required the amount of time and attention to do the responsible, right-thing...like raising a puppy for 2-years...would not have worked!

I know you wrote that you have found a home for him, but you might also look into surrendering him to a GR rescue, (if your breeder doesn't want him back). Our breeder made us sign a contract saying that he got Archie back in the event we could no longer keep him. I feel like a rescue organization is going to do an intensive vetting process for a rehome, so that Brixley doesn't end up back on the rehome circuit.

I know this is a very hard decision and I feel for you having to make it.
 

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I want to start by saying that sharing your post on a GR forum about the quandary you're in, tells me that you DO care about your dog. My Archie is 9-months old (today, actually) and my husband and I have been ACTIVELY training him EVERYDAY since we brought him home at 8-weeks. He is our 1st dog, so we were total newbies to all of this! We researched this forum for a year before we brought him home and we still felt overwhelmed and under-prepared. We were however on the same page with Archie at all times. We also didn't let outside influences, no matter how well meaning, dictate how we were going to train Archie. We are fortunate to have gone, and continue to go to a training center 1x per week for small group instruction (you can also get instruction for free through YouTube videos)... BUT then it is the BOATLOAD of time/work put in on the other 6-days that truly makes the difference. Especially now, during Archie's super BRATTY teenager phase!!! It doesn't sound like Brixley and you and your spouse have done formal training, so that, coupled with his teenage phase and your well intentioned, but uninformed in-laws, is probably why you are at this point. I think if you keep him, you'd need to make intensive training a unified top priority for the next 4-months and then continue to train even after the baby is born.

I am a 63 year-old retired educator with tons of time to make Archie my project! I will be honest, FOR ME, I could not have put in the time and attention it takes to raise a GR puppy into a wonderfully trained 2-year old, (yep, I think it takes that long!)
It does take that long and a continuation, although not as happening, for another year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
“So? I don't appreciate people not thinking thru scenarios”

@Prism Goldens my goal to put my situation on this forum was for advice not to be scolded. And we did think it through when we got him however, we also did not plan to become pregnant yet. It happened very fast and a lot of changes has come with it. Things happen and life happens. I came here for direction to help me with a very tough decision that is hurting me mentally.

But to come at me and be so judgemental when you are not in my shoes and try to reverse the scenario
and say “ if he were a human baby and another were expected, would you 5 months ahead start taking attention from him in anticipation of his losing it in March?” Is wrong of you. You don’t know me.l and my capabilities. Again he is a dog,not a human. So yes I don’t appreciate your approach. You are coming off very judgmental and don’t know every circumstance I am in.
 

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You're in a terribly unenviable position, but I'm not sure you're making the case for yourself in distinguishing between dog and human. We just got our first dog likely around the same time you did because ours is only a couple months older than yours, but we love him just as if he were a member of our human family (to be honest, we might even love him more than some family/extended family members 🤣)

We too are a young couple and god willing, maybe will be expecting to add a new family member in the next year or so, the earliest would be right when our puppy turns two, so we have good timing on our side.

I get it -- life happens and sometimes you can't plan for the unexpected, but when I read threads about people's dogs crossing the rainbow bridge, my heart aches for when the day we will have to say goodbye to ours (hopefully a long, long time from now). If you don't have the same emotional connection with your puppy, I would say rehoming would be the way to go so. There are so many homes and families that area able to take on a golden retriever puppy.

On the flip side, if you're willing to bear down and wade through some more puppy months, his bite will get softer and his hyperness will subside with training. And the benefits to raising your children with a pet are astronomical -- numerous studies are out there, not only for good healthy germs but for emotional well-being as well.
 

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Please do seriously consider rehoming him. I know my daughter was able to get a wonderful one year old female from a reputable breeder after a young family decided they couldn't handle and give the puppy enough attention and training. She was able to give Gracie a new home, lots of attention and training. They are a great pair now... Gracie has her CGC and is trained as a therapy dog.
 

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This is our situation with our golden just something to read and see what other people have done now our golden no matter what is obedient to the end but when we got him it was just him then we had our son who he was amazing with id trust my sons life with our golden he and my son are best friends my son is almost four now and then we got 4 more dogs over the course of a couple years so if we are not the he has the other dogs we have a electric fence which when done right is very nice but always have a camera so you can check in on him good luck on your decision I’m sure it’s very hard everyone’s situation is different
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I want to start by saying that sharing your post on a GR forum about the quandary you're in, tells me that you DO care about your dog. My Archie is 9-months old (today, actually) and my husband and I have been ACTIVELY training him EVERYDAY since we brought him home at 8-weeks. He is our 1st dog, so we were total newbies to all of this! We researched this forum for a year before we brought him home and we still felt overwhelmed and under-prepared. We were however on the same page with Archie at all times. We also didn't let outside influences, no matter how well meaning, dictate how we were going to train Archie. We are fortunate to have gone, and continue to go to a training center 1x per week for small group instruction (you can also get instruction for free through YouTube videos)... BUT then it is the BOATLOAD of time/work put in on the other 6-days that truly makes the difference. Especially now, during Archie's super BRATTY teenager phase!!! It doesn't sound like Brixley and you and your spouse have done formal training, so that, coupled with his teenage phase and your well intentioned, but uninformed in-laws, is probably why you are at this point. I think if you keep him, you'd need to make intensive training a unified top priority for the next 4-months and then continue to train even after the baby is born.

I am a 63 year-old retired educator with tons of time to make Archie my project! I will be honest, FOR ME, I could not have put in the time and attention it takes to raise a GR puppy into a wonderfully trained 2-year old, (yep, I think it takes that long!), when I was pregnant, or even when my kids were young (I now have 3-adult sons). I know many, many folks do it, I would not have been one of them. I also worked full time, so again FOR ME, anything else that would have required the amount of time and attention to do the responsible, right-thing...like raising a puppy for 2-years...would not have worked!

I know you wrote that you have found a home for him, but you might also look into surrendering him to a GR rescue, (if your breeder doesn't want him back). Our breeder made us sign a contract saying that he got Archie back in the event we could no longer keep him. I feel like a rescue organization is going to do an intensive vetting process for a rehome, so that Brixley doesn't end up back on the rehome circuit.

I know this is a very hard decision and I feel for you having to make it.
Thank you for being so understanding. It has taking a toll on me mentally. And I think about this more than anything the past couple of months.
 

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This is a heart wrenching position to be in, I can tell you love Brixley.
Those mouthy 'teen' stages can be trying for any one. My daughter (late 30's) didn't want to visit when Honey was jumping and biting in her excitement to greet visitors!
I must have missed where you're from but maybe there is a rescue near you.
 

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But now, I’m struggling with allowing myself to give him too much attention since we are expecting. I want to keep my focus and priority on my baby.

We also do not have a fenced backyard. I thought maybe we could make him into a outside dog however I worry that he might escape or get lonely. I feel bad because he is no longer the center of attention and honestly will continue to not be. We have found a home for him and I’m still in between. I don’t know what to do because I picked him out from his litter, I have raised him the best I can. But like I said my husband and I are unable to figure out the best way or agree on how to prepare him for a baby.
He is very hyperactive and needy, which I know we will not have time for when we do have baby.
Any advice?Is rehoming the best idea?

If you have a second child, will you feel guilty about giving your first child attention?
This is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard.
One of my employees is currently 34 weeks pregnant. She has 2 bassett hounds. They are the center of her world. And when her baby gets here, they will be a part of that. My goldens brothers owner is currently 34 weeks pregnant also. She is not planning on giving up her dog.
My housesitter is currently due in March. She has 2 german shepherds and a lunatic pom/husky mix. She has absolutely zero plans to rehome her dogs. She actually just bit the bullet and fenced in her yard, as she knows it'll be hard to let 3 dogs out safely with a baby in tow, especially in winter.
You make sacrifices and do what you have to do in order to make things works.
Please rehome him and don't get another dog.

Edited to add that I know I sound harsh. And I am. I don't think most dogs belong living outdoors (and my dogs live indoors, get plenty of off leash playtime, go everywhere with me, and are perfectly well rounded, indoor dogs). It's just the part about focusing on the baby and trying to not give too much attention to the dog. This literally just baffles me and I don't understand it.
 

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I read this post and almost cried then got mad. This is after the fact that but you should’ve thought about all of these things before bringing home a living life to be part of your family. Your dog is a lifelong commitment from you for the ENTIRE life of the dog. I could not have said it any better than Prism who is one of the best breeders you’ll ever find. This situation is just really sad and it is self created. I hope your dog finds a good home and is loved.
 

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I read this post and almost cried then got mad. This is after the fact that but you should’ve thought about all of these things before bringing home a living life to be part of your family. Your dog is a lifelong commitment from you for the ENTIRE life of the dog. I could not have said it any better than Prism who is one of the best breeders you’ll ever find. This situation is just really sad and it is self created. I hope your dog finds a good home and is loved.
You can be mad all you want. I came on here seeking guidance and help. I didn’t come on here for you to be rude. I did my part when I got him. I researched, I bought books over golden retrievers to prepare myself.
I know the worth of this dog. He deserves nothing by a great life. Not to be kenneled up all day or outside. he deserves love and attention. Like I said above we are considering rehoming but it’s not set and stone. I came to this forum for help not to be ridiculed.
 

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I’m really sorry you’re in this situation. FWIW, anyone who is bashing you here has yet to experience how you can do everything right and plan ahead diligently and responsibly…and still have stuff happen. It’s called life and it can happen no matter how thoroughly we try to foresee every possibility.

I’m in the “rehome” camp. The very fact that you’re here, knowing you were going to be judged, tells me that you want the best for this dog and know in your heart you can’t provide it.

Give him the best life you can. Sometimes that doesn’t look look the way what you hoped it would.
 

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“So? I don't appreciate people not thinking thru scenarios”

@Prism Goldens my goal to put my situation on this forum was for advice not to be scolded. And we did think it through when we got him however, we also did not plan to become pregnant yet. It happened very fast and a lot of changes has come with it. Things happen and life happens. I came here for direction to help me with a very tough decision that is hurting me mentally.

But to come at me and be so judgemental when you are not in my shoes and try to reverse the scenario
and say “ if he were a human baby and another were expected, would you 5 months ahead start taking attention from him in anticipation of his losing it in March?” Is wrong of you. You don’t know me.l and my capabilities. Again he is a dog,not a human. So yes I don’t appreciate your approach. You are coming off very judgmental and don’t know every circumstance I am in.
This tough decision seems made in my opinion... by the time someone asks a hard question they already know the right answer. I can appreciate your willingness to let this dog live a good life elsewhere and I hope for him that you have sought a new home in a safe-for-him way.... not friends but you know them well enough to have met them, know their circumstances, etc...
I guess I think a rescue would be a better choice because you are not practiced or expert on how to rehome a dog.

And in my own defense against your judgement on MY judgement, I am expert at finding perfect homes, and in the last 40 years I've been down the road you are on but from the other side of the street... as I said in an earlier post, it's why I am really careful on those rare occasions I sell a puppy to a young married couple. Its the thing I do not like about young couples for one of my puppies-the dog I have generations of attention and love into, relegated to the yard, ignored, at the most important time in his development. By the time wifey is 6 months into new mom, she's tired of throwing food at the dog who is dirty by now and has become even more of a behavior problem, and dog comes back- and he's damaged from the 6-9 months of being ignored. It's a huge job for me to rehab the dog this young couple has so carelessly damaged. Your dog doesn't even have the benefit of a good breeder obviously and while you think you can choose a good home, I think that a rescue would be a far better solution that the word of people who want to make him into a SD when it's unlikely he is well suited to SD work.
 

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@Dodgerqueen
Please understand that we are speaking from the heart. It may feel like scolding but try not to take it personally. That's not productive and I am sure no one's intent.
We can't help but be advocates for your dog who is in this situation through absolutely no fault of his own. And you know this - feel this - which is why you courageously put your question out on this site.
It is a "golden" site so the members are very passionate and have, in many cases, decades of experience.
You already know I am in the "rehome" camp. I believe a Golden Rescue is the best place to go to get the BEST home for your baby. Goldens are in such huge demand and a Golden Rescue Group scrupulously screens potential new homes. They all have long waiting lists and the new home is often experienced golden people. To insure the best life for your golden, go this route. It is actually a very selfless (not selfish) thing to do. Not every situation in life works out as expected. It will be okay and will work out.
 

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You can be mad all you want. I came on here seeking guidance and help. I didn’t come on here for you to be rude. I did my part when I got him. I researched, I bought books over golden retrievers to prepare myself.
I know the worth of this dog. He deserves nothing by a great life. Not to be kenneled up all day or outside. he deserves love and attention. Like I said above we are considering rehoming but it’s not set and stone. I came to this forum for help not to be ridiculed.
There is so much wrong here. I am not being rude. My guess is that you’re upset because you feel some guilt as you struggle with this decision. Full disclosure I like animals more than most people. I cannot fathom that thought going through my mind but that’s me. Only speaking for me and my wife and kids, deciding to bring a puppy home means adopting that puppy which comes with a lifelong commitment to do whatever it takes because that dog is now a part of your family. Would you re-home and adopted child? Probably not. That is how I look at dog adoption. That dog became attached to you the minute you drove home with it. Dogs love us unconditionally so may sadness is for the dog and me being mad isn’t necessarily directed at you but more of an acceptance of people to view a living thing as a non permanent commitment. FWIW 27 years ago we brought home a Chessie. My kids were 4 and 5 at the time. I would venture that 98% of people on this forum would have brought that dog back. We made a lifelong commitment to that dog when we brought her home. We learned how our Chessie thought. We learned what made her tick. In short, it was hard, but the most rewarding time of our lives. I’d like to think and my kids would agree, Nellie made us better people because we learned from each other and gave each other a chance. We never gave up. Now we are nearing the end of life of our second Chessie who is 13+ years old. I’m waiting on a Golden. My first dog as an adult was a Golden. Maybe a part of my sadness is that our hearts are so ready for a Golden boy or girl and you have a beautiful soul and contemplate disrupting its life for your convenience. If you want validation on giving your family member to someone else then you have it from me. I’m afraid the fork in the road you have come to will leave you with regrets either way unless you are fully committed. I truly think taking the time, love, and commitment to work through this with your dog will be one of the most rewarding life experiences for all of you. In that end, if your not committed, I’m sure there is a little boy or girl or family out there dreaming of your dog. FWIW, I am happy to help you should you decide to work through it. After 27 years of Chessies, I can give you a LOT of support and ideas. I wish you well but most importantly, I wish your dog the best life possible.
 

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what a hard situation. I have an 11mo- they're quite a handful!
i’d really recommend the facebook group Dog training advice and support who have a number of posts on tnis topic (join and look under “guides”) Dog Training Advice and Support
you can post and ask for individual advice too
i have copied one of their posts below. It strikes me that you absolutely could prepare your pup for the baby’s arrival but only if you get your husband on board, and I’m not sure how to do that.
good luck with both your pup and baby.

When you find out you're expecting, you have a gazillion things on your mind.

It's important to consider our dogs in this situation too. A lot of things are going to change, and if we use the time of pregnancy to prepare them for what's coming, then life will be a lot easier when things get real. This is particularly relevant for parents expecting their first baby, or their first baby with a new dog. (Apologies, gents, for talking to the ladies a lot in some passages... don't feel left out, it's just difficult to keep this gender neutral. Our example dog will be a boy though!)

So, sit down a few minutes and think about the following a little bit:

What sort of dog do you have? Is he pretty unflappable or easily stressed? Is he a child lover or rather worried by them? Has he met babies at all? How does he deal with change? Is he very routine -focused? Or doesn't it matter if the days are all a bit here, there and everywhere? Is he young and energetic, or maybe old and sore? How attached is he to you adults? How much attention does he require? What cues does he know? Does he know them reliably? What sort of things worry you, thinking about your dog and a baby?

Every family and every dog is different. Be honest and possibly a bit over-critical rather than blasé about these questions. The answers to all of those will help you a lot in determining what sort of preparation you should be doing.

Now, seeing as I've just recently been through this myself, with two very different dogs and two very different babies.... let me give you a bit of an idea of what is likely going to change.

Let's start in pregnancy. You'll become, well, round. Walrus-shaped, it'll feel like. You won't be able to cuddle your dogs as comfortably. You might feel hot all the time and not enjoy a canine radiator right close to you. You will become short of breath, sooner or later. And likely tired. So walks will become slower, shorter, flatter,...

You might be laid up for a short or extended period of your pregnancy. You might even have to be hospitalised.

You will in most cases have to go to hospital in the end, likely rather spontaneously, and possibly stay for a bit.

While you are preparing for the baby, you will quite likely undertake some renovating or redecorating. You might even move house. New furniture will appear and/or need to be built, possibly including power tools. Equipment such as a pram, nappy bin or a car seat will arrive (some of these double as a rocker... mine found tapping it with their nose or paw to make it move hilarious...). You might have the midwife come round and possibly examine you at home. You'll go on maternity, be home a lot, go to the doctors a lot, then suddenly disappear, possibly at an ungodly hour.

While baby is being born and mum and baby are still in hospital, daddy hopefully will be quite keen to be there too.

So now you're new parents, and about to bring home your little bundle. You'll carry them in your arms or bring them in in the car seat.

They might sleep, or be awake. They'll eventually burst into song. They might do that a lot, even. They will trap you under them when they've fallen asleep, and you won't really want to move. If you're lucky, for a few hours. And chances are, at least for the first few weeks, you'll have no idea yet, when those naps are going to happen. If you're really lucky, you can at some point actually put them down for a nap. So you'll put up a baby monitor. Which at some point will start blaring this really weird sounding cry.

The baby will sigh, squeak, whine, mumble, even breathe. One of my dogs had a meltdown after my first baby arrived, because the travel cot suddenly made breathing sounds...

You'll be spending weeks to months, depending on the character of your baby, trying to find your feet. You'll be doing everything at the baby's time, accommodating every need baby has.... which again will be different every couple weeks. It's basically a game of ever-changing goal posts...

You might have daddy home for a while. You might be fit and healthy in no time, or you might be unwell, injured or laid up.

Your health visitor will stop by a lot.

Other people may want to stop by a lot.

At some point you'll fall back into some sort of normality. You'll be used to doing everything with one hand and always keeping baby close. You'll be taking them to the bathroom and sitting on the floor with them for playtime. You'll start to venture out, even with the dogs. You might want to take them all in the car, or you might want to push baby in the pram. You might have stairs to negotiate. Or muddy paws to clean before letting them in the house.

Sooner than you think, your baby will be interactive and even mobile. They'll scream, shout, squeal, hiccup, flail arms and legs, throw things.... Then they will start to roll. Some only roll over. Others roll right across the room. Mobility is right there now. Your baby will make its own way along the floor. It'll investigate everything. Sleeping dogs, empty or occupied dog beds, water and food bowls (!!!), toys of any variety... You name it. You'll need to preempt and prevent of course, cause they'll definitely try if they get the chance.

Then, not long after, they'll start pulling themselves up. On you, on the table, on whatever they can find. Again, this includes dogs in any and all positions and situations. No, baby shouldn't be allowed that. But they sure as h... will try!

The next step after that, of course, is moving on two legs. Unsteadily at first, unpredictably, and unable to be careful. Also somewhat vulnerable to falling if knocked by more than a feather.

And that's just about the first year. Chances are, at some point mum will be going back to work, and not be home as much anymore. A child minder might even be in the house instead, or relatives.

So... Now I've told you all this, and I've not even mentioned what to do with your dog.

True.

Because to a good degree, it'll be different for every family. Look at that text again, thinking with each bit, how your dog would handle this, what they might do, how they might react.

That will give you a good idea of what you specifically need to consider when preparing your dog for the new arrival.

A few general things that will apply in nearly all cases:

- look at your dog's exercise needs. How will you be able to meet them? Are you over-fulfilling them so far, often doing activities, going on strenuous hikes? It might be a good idea to train down for now, as you may well not be able to keep them up for a while.

- routine - will basically go out the window for a while as far as the dogs are concerned. So if they have a set schedule so far, now is the time to slowly and gradually start varying it. Ten, fifteen, twenty minutes back and forth... building up until the schedule is gone.

- beds and sleeping arrangements. Where do the dogs sleep now? Will this stay the same after baby is born? Will their beds be in a convenient space so you don't trip over them at night when getting up? Will they have a safe space that baby/crawler/walker can't get to? How can you ensure this? (Eg, access to the upstairs to retreat is fine and dandy, until you have to put stairgates up because your crawler crawls stairs...)

- rooms and access. Similar to the bed thing. Which rooms are they allowed in now, which ones do you want them in later? Which ones will be off limits? Start training that now. Not only is it much easier for all of you, it'll also prevent them forming negative associations with the baby

- food and water bowls. They are favourite crawler targets. Find an inaccessible space! This is important, a dog should not have to worry about a child interfering with their food and drink. It is of course particularly important if your dog has a history of guarding food or water.

- child and dog safety. How does your dog feel about a baby close by? Direct contact should be avoided (see the article on magnetising!). But can they cope with baby in the same room? Will they leave if they have had enough? Can they have toys without the baby getting them? Where can the baby hang out with toys without the dogs interfering? Since you will sometimes need two hands, how can you keep baby safe and happy when not in your arms, while keeping dogs safe and happy too, and not risking any incidents or accidents? Stairgates, playpens, crates can all be useful here.

- traffic safety. Has your dog ever seen a pram? Can he walk beside one? Can you negotiate curbs, corners, stairs in this setup? Can you get baby and dogs in and out of the car safely?

- where do you want your dog to be and what do you want your dog to be able to do? As mentioned above, think about where their beds should be, reinforce them strongly for using their safe spots. Make these a preferred place now. Off limits rooms can be gated off, or you put a mat just outside them and train a default down on that (lots less reliable of course). Do you need to practice a cue to direct your dog on and off furniture? Do you need to refresh on recall? Loose lead walking? Polite behaviour in doorways? Do this now.

In addition to these general things, there will be specific areas for each dog that they may struggle with.

Does your dog not do well with change? Consider spreading out the decorating and furniture building to give them time to adjust. But leave some time at the end to allow them to get comfortable with the full setup. Include the pram, car seat etc in this. Also if you'll be using baby toiletries, consider using them on yourself for a few weeks prior so the dog can get used to the smell and associate it with you.

Is your dog not good with strangers/guests? Think about how to manage this, practise him being put away in a safe room with a nice chew, or practise polite greetings.

Is your dog noise sensitive? Baby sounds off of YouTube, played at very low volume while doing nice things, gradually working up the volume.

Not sure how your dog will react if you're holding something in your arms, either standing up or sitting down? Get yourself a baby doll and try. If it can cry, that will help you gauge how they would react to strange sudden noise from your arms too. It won't be the perfect double for your baby. But it'll give you an idea whether you need to work on this, or whether they're nonplussed. Plus, it'll demonstrate to you how life with one free hand will be. Quite an eye opener.

Baby wearing can be a great practical solution to many everyday issues while keeping baby safe, comfortable, and out of trouble. You can rent or borrow a carrier/wrap/sling and use your doll to make your dog familiar with long bits of fabric dangling or being tied, rings clattering or buckles clicking.... plus you moving slightly awkwardly for short periods of time;) (Bonus: you'll already be familiar with your chosen carrier type when baby gets involved.)

Make arrangements for that time when you won't be home, too. If you happen to not be able to walk the dog during or after pregnancy - who will? Introduce them now. Who can come into the house and pick them up or let them out if you have to leave sharpish? Will your dog be okay with that?

If your dog is very attached to one of you. It might be a good idea to start introducing a visual unavailability cue (search the group for an instruction).

You'll see by now that there will be different areas of work for each family.

A pet remedy or adaptil diffuser plugged in a few weeks ahead may make it easier for some dogs.

Avoid the dreaded visitor rush, for everybody's sake.

Ask friends and family for help with the dog if the dog is comfortable with that.

Make yourself dog-savvy! Learn as much as possible about their body language! This will help you loads in assessing situations as they arise!

Do make sure the dog still gets individual attention, and don't only do it when baby is asleep, as the dog may quickly learn "baby awake means no time for me" which may not be a good thing.

By all means bring back a bit of clothing from hospital... But you don't need to actually introduce dog and baby in any way. He knows baby is there:)

Written by Rebecca Kohnke
 

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Ps I would also Highly recommend Getting a baby gate now and starting to train pup that he’s ok and safe if separated from you by this. This will allow distance whilst not needing to put pup outside.
 
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