Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Kate
Joined
·
20,870 Posts
My opinion is that's pretty hefty.

I can understand something in the 70's being slightly chubby, but big boned pup + going through a growth phase can be understandable.

With a dog that's over 70 pounds well before he turns a year old - the concern is him carrying too much weight while his bones and muscles are still growing.

A dog that's already 80 pounds before he turns 12 months - that's worrisome since young dogs tend to be VERY EASY to keep in shape. Their metabolisms run pretty strong at that young age and by the time their muscles start popping by age 2-3, they are in the best shape of their lives.

Once they get into the middle ages (after age 5), it's a slippery slope. Their metabolisms start slowing down (especially if neutered or spayed, but even intact dogs do have some "settling"). By the time they are 6-8 years old, you start having some 10 extra pounds or so that the dog is carrying (if the dog was svelte to begin with). Dogs who are already too heavy as young dogs are going to be dealing with more arthritis in middle age which slows or restricts their activity and makes them prone to gain much more weight.

There are people out there who have gotten used to seeing goldens being overweight and they shouldn't. <= I personally see MORE smalller goldens than bigger ones. And generally it's only an inch difference.

Even if a golden retriever is 25" (for example) - which is an inch over. He still should not be 20-30 pounds overweight. I had a golden who was 25" - and in his prime (before age 5), he typically weighed 73-75 pounds. And he was not a "skinny" dog. He was good sized with a lot of bone.

870244


My 8 month old is the little guy on the right side. He is 63 pounds and while he's as tall as his brother (he won't or shouldn't grow taller), is slightly more immature (bone, muscle, etc) in comparison. His brother is 69 pounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,915 Posts
When we ask how tall he is, we mean from the shoulder to the floor.
80# is probably too heavy- he isn't fully grown yet and he should be on the lean side at this age, developmentally.
Of course, if he is WAY over standard in height, 80# might be normal....but that would beg the question of why he is so tall almost more than why he is so heavy. My 5YO boy who is 23.5-so smack in the middle - and quite muscular with an abundant coat weighs 75.. and he is 5.
 

·
Super Moderator Leader
Joined
·
46,375 Posts
how do I post a picture

Post #3 in this thread gives instructions-

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
My opinion is that's pretty hefty.

I can understand something in the 70's being slightly chubby, but big boned pup + going through a growth phase can be understandable.

With a dog that's over 70 pounds well before he turns a year old - the concern is him carrying too much weight while his bones and muscles are still growing.

A dog that's already 80 pounds before he turns 12 months - that's worrisome since young dogs tend to be VERY EASY to keep in shape. Their metabolisms run pretty strong at that young age and by the time their muscles start popping by age 2-3, they are in the best shape of their lives.

Once they get into the middle ages (after age 5), it's a slippery slope. Their metabolisms start slowing down (especially if neutered or spayed, but even intact dogs do have some "settling"). By the time they are 6-8 years old, you start having some 10 extra pounds or so that the dog is carrying (if the dog was svelte to begin with). Dogs who are already too heavy as young dogs are going to be dealing with more arthritis in middle age which slows or restricts their activity and makes them prone to gain much more weight.

There are people out there who have gotten used to seeing goldens being overweight and they shouldn't. <= I personally see MORE smalller goldens than bigger ones. And generally it's only an inch difference.

Even if a golden retriever is 25" (for example) - which is an inch over. He still should not be 20-30 pounds overweight. I had a golden who was 25" - and in his prime (before age 5), he typically weighed 73-75 pounds. And he was not a "skinny" dog. He was good sized with a lot of bone.

View attachment 870244

My 8 month old is the little guy on the right side. He is 63 pounds and while he's as tall as his brother (he won't or shouldn't grow taller), is slightly more immature (bone, muscle, etc) in comparison. His brother is 69 pounds.
he is 23 inches
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Megora those are some handsome boys.

Stumped, the only way to know if he's "too big" is to check to see if you can easily feel his ribs. There are lots of pics on-line to help with a Body Condition Score (BCS). I will note that younger dogs should probably be more lithe than chonk. When I bathe my 6 month old, I'm always surprised at how skinny he is. He'll fill out over the next year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Loyal all stage
I am not an expert on dog food, but we too have a male Golden, he is 12wks old. He is our 7th Golden over 25+ years. I have learned that Golden's do best on a food that is formulated for "Large Dogs'. As I understand it, the formulation help prevent to fast of a growth pattern giving their bones and joints time to get set, prior to weight gain. Many of the brands sell a 'large dog" formulation. I am a believer in Purina Pro Plan Large Dog Puppy Chow, after he gets older I will go to their regular PPP Large Dog....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,915 Posts
So a 23" dog is -barring heavier bone than a Golden should carry- overweight. I have been in Goldens for many many years and only ever know one @ 23 who was that size, and he was not a puppy.
 

·
Golden Ret Enthusiast
Joined
·
1,636 Posts
Loyal all stage
That may be why. Goldens should be fed puppy food specifically for large breed puppies. All life stage foods are actually small breed puppy foods and tend to have upwards of a 2:1 calcium to phosphorus ratio. That's too much calcium and can cause the puppy to grow to fast. Phosphorus inhibits calcium absorbtion. So a large breed puppy formula usually will have that between 1.1:1 to 1.4:1

If he's not really overweight and is tall, that is likely the reason in my mind. If course that's saying the parents were just not huge goldens as well. Some breeders don't breed to standard.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
20,870 Posts
I have no idea what Loyal All Stage food is..

But personally speaking, I do not feed a large breed formula. My guys get switched from regular puppy food to adult food by 5-6 months (depending on when their adult teeth come in). Both breeders behind my dogs never feed puppy food at all. The one feeds adult food from the start. The other feeds an all life stages kibble from the start.

Would venture to say that brand and formula of food have nothing to do with the issue. It's amount of food that the pups are fed.

Both my pups are bottomless pits when it comes to eating - meaning, they would not walk away and leave food behind no matter how much food in the bowl. They love eating - like most retrievers.

The instructions on the food bags recommend feeding a ton of food for the dogs - it's a guideline based on those dogs who are very active and have hyperactive walk-ten-million-walks-a-day owners. If you and your dog are more sedentary and are looking just going outside and calling potty runs exercise (yes, we all do that in winter when we don't want to go walk the dogs! :D ) - they cannot be fed 3-5 cups of food! Especially if they are getting treats throughout the day.

And personally speaking - I think low to medium exercise is best with young dogs. Generally.

Mine go for 2-3 mile walks every day because they are very high energy dogs. They need to run like crazy every day + and they also need their walks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I have no idea what Loyal All Stage food is..

But personally speaking, I do not feed a large breed formula. My guys get switched from regular puppy food to adult food by 5-6 months (depending on when their adult teeth come in). Both breeders behind my dogs never feed puppy food at all. The one feeds adult food from the start. The other feeds an all life stages kibble from the start.

Would venture to say that brand and formula of food have nothing to do with the issue. It's amount of food that the pups are fed.

Both my pups are bottomless pits when it comes to eating - meaning, they would not walk away and leave food behind no matter how much food in the bowl. They love eating - like most retrievers.

The instructions on the food bags recommend feeding a ton of food for the dogs - it's a guideline based on those dogs who are very active and have hyperactive walk-ten-million-walks-a-day owners. If you and your dog are more sedentary and are looking just going outside and calling potty runs exercise (yes, we all do that in winter when we don't want to go walk the dogs! :D ) - they cannot be fed 3-5 cups of food! Especially if they are getting treats throughout the day.

And personally speaking - I think low to medium exercise is best with young dogs. Generally.

Mine go for 2-3 mile walks every day because they are very high energy dogs. They need to run like crazy every day + and they also need their walks.
I am confused when you say low to medium exercise is best.I have been reading the complete opposite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
I have no idea what Loyal All Stage food is..



And personally speaking - I think low to medium exercise is best with young dogs. Generally.

Mine go for 2-3 mile walks every day because they are very high energy dogs. They need to run like crazy every day + and they also need their walks.
I agree with much of what you say. As you know when talking about dog foods and feeding their are lots of different ideas and most of us would swear we are right.

But I was confused by your last two statements above...I know that puppies bones are soft and the joints are not even 'seated' for a few weeks. Until this happens exercise should be limited. Like you say low to medium is best with young dogs. Then you seem to contradict that and say "mine go 2-3 mile every day"...because they are high energy dogs!
I am sure I am misunderstanding your comments, please clarify if you will?

Both my Golden's are from field pedigree dogs, as have been all our dogs. Our current mature dog is a hard driving female that runs like the wind and shows ton of style. Our newest pup is also from a field line that has hard drive and style. I have seen both the Stud and Bitch run. Everything I see from our pup already suggests he too will meet our expectations, both in style and drive.


On the food issue, I agree that at 6-8 months we will shift our pup off of puppy chow. But I will stay with a large breed product as both our breeder, trainer, vet, and I believe it is a best approach. But, I have met many good dog people who share your views....
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top