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So, over the weekend I accidentally cut Winx with the scissors while doing some quick grooming. I wasn't too worried until a little flap of skin appeared. Off to the vet!

Got the area all shaved and cleaned up. She recommended a very natural treatment. I am to do the water therapy. (Warm washcloth with soapy water) Normal. The interesting thing is what she has me doing next. I need to take a bandaid and slather it with raw honey and put it over the wound. Do this twice a day. No antibiotics or special sprays.

I'll take before and after photos so we can see how it works. I am using honey straight from a beekeeper.
 

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So, over the weekend I accidentally cut Winx with the scissors while doing some quick grooming. I wasn't too worried until a little flap of skin appeared. Off to the vet!

Got the area all shaved and cleaned up. She recommended a very natural treatment. I am to do the water therapy. (Warm washcloth with soapy water) Normal. The interesting thing is what she has me doing next. I need to take a bandaid and slather it with raw honey and put it over the wound. Do this twice a day. No antibiotics or special sprays.

I'll take before and after photos so we can see how it works. I am using honey straight from a beekeeper.
We talked about manuka honey the other day in a burn victim setting. As far as I know, horse people have used manuka honey often. But we had a trauma surgeon give us a lecture on one of her young patients, an Amish girl in a barn fire. She was covered in massive burns and the family hired a physician Who was familiar with their belief system.

The trauma surgeon acquiesced and decided to watch the treatment. It was primarily manuka honey and supportive care. The patient recovered with a comparable or slightly better outcome than traditional treatment.
 

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Manuka honey is often used for skin issues because of its natural anti-bacterial and anti inflammatory properties and a high concentration of antioxidants.

I have heard of human dermatologists advising it for certain conditions. I also vaguely recall my vet advising it as part of his hotspot protocol, but it’s been 12 years since I’ve had to deal with a hotspot (thankfully) so I’m not 100% certain. I know he does recommend it for some skin issues.
 

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I tried manuka honey inside and out with my Jacks...

I do not know if it helped him at all, but I know he LOVED his breakfasts his last 6 months. Sardines, cottage cheese, and manuka honey. And some ground up mushrooms. There was supposed to be apricot seed ground up and added to the mix, but it scared me too much.
 

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When I worked pet ER (and even now at a GP vet), we used manuka honey a lot for wounds. I have 0 understanding of how it works, just that it’s supposed to help speed up healing. We had precut honey squares that we could put on the wound before it was bandaged
 
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Honey is antibacterial. Surgical honey is manuka honey which is from New Zealand. When my immune system was compromised from chemo and radiation, the nurses used it on an infected scratch from my puppy’s sharp claws on my delicate skin. It was so much better than OTC antibiotic cream. This was two years ago. I thought it was weird, but trusted my nurse. I’m a believer now.
 

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Surgeon here for humans not dogs But my wife is a vet so I’ve come to find out that there is a lot of crossover and a mammal is a mammal for the most part. Certainly some significant differences. New to the forum. There’s some data on specific honey’s specifically manuka (spelling?) honey which is what Therahoney is. Hard to say how effective it really is. Certainly it helps keep the tissue moist. Maybe it has antibacterial properties. Probably doesn’t hurt. Maybe helps.

The people who sell therahoney would surely tell you it’s packed with nature’s mystery. But sugar dressings work similarly. Would never advise anyone to spend lots of money on expensive honey and would certainly say probably any raw honey is fine. Bacitracin works fine too and is cheap but maybe there’s some reason vets don’t want to use it? I dunno. I’ll ask my wife. Difficult to study this stuff with any kind of meaningful sample size and proving noninferiority isn’t too hard since most of healing wounds is about good frequent care, nutrition, and keeping it clean not what dressing you use.
 
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