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Finn
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
A JH test is 4 single marked retrieves, 2 land and 2 water, under 100 yards. The dog needs to sit at the line but can be restrained with a lead and collar until sent and must then deliver to hand.
This is very basic puppy level.
what’s the difference between a marked and unmarked retrieve?
 

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what’s the difference between a marked and unmarked retrieve?
"Marks" are field trial lingo for a bird thrown or shot by a gunner in the field. The gunners or throwers can "standout", remain visible to the dog and handler (typically wearing white). The gunners can also "retire", which means they hide in a blind after throwing a mark.
There are also "blind" retrieves in hunt tests and field trials, although not in junior hunt test or field trial derbies. On a blind retrieve, the handlers know the location of a bird in the field, the dogs do not. The dogs must be sent from a designated starting point, "the line", and are directed to the bird by hand signals and voice commands. The dogs should not be hunting, they are supposed to take directions from the handler with confidence and enthusiasm, knowing they will be guided to the bird.

In hunt tests all the marks are in theory "retired guns", in reality very few are. I have been to half a dozen hunt tests and only seen a few holding blinds that were not blatantly obvious to any dog with eyes and a brain.
 

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"Marks" are field trial lingo for a bird thrown or shot by a gunner in the field. The gunners or throwers can "standout", remain visible to the dog and handler (typically wearing white). The gunners can also "retire", which means they hide in a blind after throwing a mark.
There are also "blind" retrieves in hunt tests and field trials, although not in junior hunt test or field trial derbies. On a blind retrieve, the handlers know the location of a bird in the field, the dogs do not. The dogs must be sent from a designated starting point, "the line", and are directed to the bird by hand signals and voice commands. The dogs should not be hunting, they are supposed to take directions from the handler with confidence and enthusiasm, knowing they will be guided to the bird.

In hunt tests all the marks are in theory "retired guns", in reality very few are. I have been to half a dozen hunt tests and only seen a few holding blinds that were not blatantly obvious to any dog with eyes and a brain.
This is very helpful. I quickly get confused by the lingo when I read about hunt tests and field trials.
 

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Getting off topic, here is an example of a Field Trial land series, a triple mark, a shot flier and two retired.
It was judged by a couple friends I train with.
 

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A couple blind retrieves in qualifying stakes. Blinds in Open and Amateur stakes are considerably more complex and difficult.
 

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Be aware that AKC Junior Hunter (JH) titles require very little training and almost no field talent, UKC Started even less. They indicate a desire to retrieve and not much more.
You can look up a dogs history on entry express, Entry Express Event Management Systems
Passing four tests earns a JH title. Multiple failed tests before getting a title is not a good sign.
A Senior Hunter (SH) title is a considerable step up. I would consider it to indicate a dog with desire and average ability as a hunting companion. Again, a dog can fail an unlimited number of tests but gets an SH title with 5 passes (or 4 plus a JH title). You need to do a little research before assuming hunt test titles mean anything.
While that may be true, remember that there’s people out there much like me. Every once in a while, I’ll enter a Field event. I think each dog has been entered in one WC event. I don’t have countless hours to train. My friends train while I’m at work because it’s cooler in the morning. We’ve done it purely for entertainment value. Pilot who has almost no field training made a rookie mistake. Can he do it? Yes! He just has a little more learning to do. I have considered UKC. Maybe I’ll open a new post asking about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
So for Brooksville/Ocala Jan circuits, you might try to friend the people I'm about to PM you- then you could watch
Oh, I hadn't seen this post before! I was so confused! Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Oh I didn't realize she's in Florida...lots of good shows and people around here. Good opportunities to see them in person too. :)
I'm not, unfortunately. Might go to Orlando for the national championship at some point, but the issue is that it's during winter break where we'd normally be skiing, so I'd probably have to be invited for juniors or something, or if the clumber that I show learns what she's doing and starts winning a lot, maybe.
 

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my parents won’t want to bring me to one just to watch one, and I don’t understand the terms (things like marks, blinds, etc could be in Greek for all I understand) enough to fully understand the differences between the levels.
This has been a terrific thread, you've had great conversation from so many good people. (I love that you're thinking and planning ahead, there's nothing wrong with a little day dreaming and what-ifs.) Ultimately you'll have to get out and get dirty but you'd surprised how much you can learn about a sport or activity from your couch, just by reading and watching videos. The books are available through the library - your local library can request books through a statewide and nationwide system if they aren't on the shelf in your branch. There are beginner books that teach you all the terminology and fundamentals and the more you read or hear them, the quicker they will 'click' for you when the day arrives that you can see it in person.

I loved that you mentioned in your opening post that you believe that working purpose matters. Seeing what it takes both physically and mentally to do the job at even a basic level is very eye opening. I wish more people saw that it's the foundation for everything we love about Goldens. I suspect that if you let your parents know that sometime in the next year or so, getting to see a hunt test or even a field trial in person is very important to your long range personal goals, they would find a way to get you to one. If they aren't that involved or supportive, then start networking and find a responsible mentor from a retrieving club - lots of Labrador people would be just as good for this purpose - to take you to one on a day trip by the time you're 17 or 18. You might find that it turns out be something you absolutely love.
 
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