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Have you consulted your vet yet?

With health conditions deteriorating fast in the USA today, it is becoming harder and harder to get appointments, with many vets limiting appointments and/or the conditions for getting a pet admitted. The situation is deteriorating fast, and I would suggest getting your pup in ASAP if at all possible. TBH, I had to look that illness up and it is nothing to play with imo.

I also suggest not risking infecting yourself or your family which unfortunately is possible when venturing out in public (Many states are either implementing mandatory store/business closings and/or mandatory Shelter in Place directives.
My vet will no longer allow a client into the practice, and we must remain outside in the car, as a vet employee retrieves the pet and any communications are then via phone.They have also ceased performing any elective surgeries and procedures.

In my state, it is still unclear if a pet illness is deemed "necessary" to legally violate such emergency proclamations. The officials here are way to busy trying to protect the public, and as yet have not addressed many impending issues.

Good luck to you and yours.
Return it immediately and ask for a full refund. Keep all discussion in writing. If they refuse to stand behind this and give you $$ and take back pup, report them to the AKC immediately. I would NEVER misrepresent a pup with Ich carriers!!!! Are you sure you pup was not tested and clear or only a carrier? That specific genetic testing should have been done by this breeder on every single pup, documentation included and provided to you with a short face to face educational discussion well before the pup went home with you. Sheryl Cammarata, Golden Endeavors, Masonville CO
Permission to show that breeder this reply is wholly granted by the author.
 

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Return it immediately and ask for a full refund. Keep all discussion in writing. If they refuse to stand behind this and give you $$ and take back pup, report them to the AKC immediately. I would NEVER misrepresent a pup with Ich carriers!!!! Are you sure you pup was not tested and clear or only a carrier? That specific genetic testing should have been done by this breeder on every single pup, documentation included and provided to you with a short face to face educational discussion well before the pup went home with you. Sheryl Cammarata, Golden Endeavors, Masonville CO
Permission to show that breeder this reply is wholly granted by the author.
Hello @Endeavors
Not sure why you tagged me. The pup in question is not mine.
 

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We have an affected pup. She is 6 months old. We knew going in the pup was affected because the breeder did the testing.So far very light dandruff at times and that’s it.
 

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We have an affected pup. She is 6 months old. We knew going in the pup was affected because the breeder did the testing.So far very light dandruff at times and that’s it.
Let me guess. The sire and dam are talented field dogs with very good health clearances aside from being ICH carriers.
I'll take that pup any day over one from a breeding of two ichtyosis clear RINO's (Retrievers In Name Only)
 

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Boy oh boy there are a lot of people who haven't done their homework.

Ichthy isn't new. It doesn't cause itching, scratching or a whole host of other conditions that have been mentioned along the way, unless there are other underlying conditions like improper thyroid function for instance.

The type of ichthy Golden Retrievers exhibit, manifests itself as excessive dander. It is for the most part cosmetic in nature. Here is the "big news" for a lot of you, it has existed in this breed from its very beginning. It has always been with the breed, it isn't new, it didn't just pop up on the horizon. It also affects a substantial portion of the breed and always has.

What is new, relatively speaking, is a genetic test for it.

This allows breeders to begin screening for it and start working to control the problem. With the large number of dogs involved, it will take many many years to rid the breed of this issue. In the meantime the breed has existed for about 150 years and nobody cared one bit about a few flakes until now.

Be informed that there is variation by breed in how ichthy affects them. In Labradors for example it is extremely bad and almost always fatal. So make certain when you're speaking to a Vet, that he is not speaking about dogs in general, but specifically about Golden Retrievers because all dogs and breeds are not the same when it comes to ichthy.

For most Goldens ichthy is an annoyance, for other breeds it can be a much more serious problem. Do not blame ichthy for other underlying problems like improper thyroid function, or immune disorders like allergies. Ichthy didn't cause those problems but it can be blown out of proportion by them.

You have to be careful in how you use genetic testing information. It is a mistake to throw the baby out with the bathwater. You can't simply throw out all ichthy involved dogs, without doing significant damage to the breed overall. It took 150 years to get where we are and it may take that long to work that problem out of the breed if that's even possible or desirable. We may find that the genes related to ichthy may also control other " desirable traits" that we don't want to lose.

Genetics is complicated business and we're just starting to learn about it.
 

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Jamie
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The sire has 14.5 AA points and Dam is QAA running AA stakes. Amazing pup so far!
Exactly! I personally know two affected dogs (one being your pup's littermate and the other a relative) and neither show severe symptoms. In fact, I didn't even know one was affected until told as he shows zero symptoms and I've groomed him. Two breeders that I respect a ton barely even consider ICH status anymore when making breeding decisions.
 

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Exactly! I personally know two affected dogs (one being your pup's littermate and the other a relative) and neither show severe symptoms. In fact, I didn't even know one was affected until told as he shows zero symptoms and I've groomed him. Two breeders that I respect a ton barely even consider ICH status anymore when making breeding decisions.
My boy is ich affected and DOES show symptoms. I have to maintain a very strict grooming routine and he gets expensive EFA supplements to keep it at bay. When it was at its worst I would have hundreds of flakes in his brush when I would brush his belly (where it seems to be most evident). When I am on top of his grooming routine and when he is not stressed, you would never know he had it, but that one flare up was a huge pain in the neck to get back under control. I would not choose an ich affected puppy again...especially for a pet. Not every dog is asymptomatic, and though I certainly don’t think it’s the worst thing out there, it is so easily avoided when making breeding decisions I believe it is something that should be bred away from within reason.
 

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Curious? Field or Show Golden?
 

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I'm wondering if anyone thinks there is a difference in how in manifests in field lines vs. conformation lines? My assumption would be there is none. They are all Golden's. My field bred guy is affected and it is a mild nuisance. I stated it earlier in this post, but so you don't have to read he's had 2 flare ups in 2 years that were just dandruff for a week or two. I definitely agree stress aggravates it. He had puppy dandruff, then when sent to our field trainer had a flare up. I went out to work with him at the trainers and he had large white flakes. I started supplements then, but have since changed his food to the Sport 30/20 Salmon and no longer need the supplements. He had another flare up about a month ago that lasted less then a week. It's really not a big deal to me.

I do want to say that now that testing is available and it's easy to avoid I agree fully that it should not be bred into a litter without a really good reason and all puppy buyers are given knowledge. I feel that way with any DNA tests available. I think it's just more accepted in the field lines.
 

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Jamie
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I'm wondering if anyone thinks there is a difference in how in manifests in field lines vs. conformation lines?
That is what some are suspecting. I understand why field breeders are making the decisions they are. Way more field dogs are ICH carriers than show dogs (from what I've seen). A good majority of talented stud dogs are carriers and if you have a carrier female that seriously limits your breeding options if you want only a clear. Keep in mind, these breeders I'm talking about do not breed pet dogs, these are high level performance dogs and the puppy owners are aware of the risk. I do agree that those mainly producing dogs that go to pet homes should try to avoid producing an affected dog.
 

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For the record my breeder had no excuse. There are some great dogs behind my dog but he could have made a different choice. His pairing wasn't that special and it's been repeated after knowing of other major issues. I bought my guy because of the dogs in the line but not the two he bred. I do understand it because I spent a ton of time researching field lines after I bought my puppy because of problems. I honestly should have walked away but he was recommended by a trainer I had a ton of respect for.
 

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My very beautiful (IMO, lol) dog Crispin was diagnosed with ichthyosis as a puppy. Since he also had inflammatory bowel disease and environmental allergies, and we were working hard to get those diagnosed and under control (thanks to Cornell Veterinary Hospital, the IBD is completely so)--it barely registered with me.

It has basically been a non-event; so mild that I actually question the diagnosis. However, it was made by a veterinary dermatologist, so it's probably true.

He's from Kyon Kennels, a large and very respected breeder. His father just died at age 14 1/2, and his mother is still alive at age 13. Frankly, I'm more grateful for the longevity of his parents than I am concerned that obviously, at least one of his parents was a carrier--but again, Crispin shows only very mild symptoms, and his skin looks fine.

We do keep him well-brushed and groomed, and since he has environmental allergies, we use Duoxo shampoos for his frequent bathings. I bathed him myself until about a year ago (he's 7) , and I'm pretty choosy about who grooms him now (it will probably be me again, very soon, due to coronavirus restrictions!). We bathe him frequently as it helps keep his environmental allergies under control.

I'm just posting to reassure the OP that there is probably a range in severity, but the disease can actually be very mild indeed. Especially as my dog has had problems far more severe than his ichthyosis, it has likely put this in perspective for me.

But even those more serious problems are under control--it's all about diligent care of the dog whom you come to love so very much...and who gives back to you every.single.day, just in the expression on his face when you arrive home after being gone for, oh, 30 minutes...

Again, we are lucky in that IF he has it, it mild and completely controlled by good grooming habits.
 
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