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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I HATE TICKS!
We just got back from a walk in the woods. Well, actually we went to where the Brittany hunt trials were held this weekend to see if there were any quail lying around. Only a couple live ones, that weren't at all interested in being retrieved by the Tito Monster. Also found out he's REALLY good at tracking. He can track every horse plop within a 50 acre area.
But I digress.
Before we got back in the car I brushed him pretty well because he had some burrs and grass seeds stuck to his coat.
When we got back, I had to brush TWO TICKS off his head.
EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
They weren't attached, just sort of meandering around on his head.
So my question is.....
If you've been out with your dogs, in an area you know or suspect has ticks, what do you do when you get back home?
I tossed him in the bath and rinsed and rinsed him for about an hour. Used regular dog shampoo (not owning any flea/tick shampoo). Figured I'd either rinse them off or drown them. Didn't see any more.
Then took an hour long shower myself. Threw all my clothes in the washer.
Suggestions???
 

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I, unfortunately, have had to get used to finding ticks on Brooks AND MYSELF!!!!! because we live in South Carolina.
 

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If we see ticks on the fur, we make sure we're up to date on Frontline first. Deer tick nymphs are so incredibly small that checking for them is no guarantee.

Then, we check through the fur, particularly on the chest, neck, and head, we give a good brushing, and we check carefully for a few days for those that slip through.

I find that if we keep Frontline current, embedded ticks are incredibly rare and almost always dead by the time we pull them.

Remember, when you pull a tick, grasp firmly as close as you can to the skin (tweezers are ideal) and pull smoothly and firmly away from the skin. No tricks, no gimmicks, definitely no vaseline, match heads, or twisting. Vets confirm over and over that a firm pull is the best way to get a tick out. I know you knew that, but it's worth posting in a tick thread.

Sometimes a tiny piece of the mouthparts breaks off in the bite. It's hard to see, but as long as you can see a tiny black head on the tick, you've gotten enough. There's a barbed piece of the mouth that usually stays in there, whether you see it or not, and it's not a big deal.

I got over a dozen ticks total on both dogs the other day after a little cool, wet weather. In CT, we see them year round, even during snowfall!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
We have tons of them around here, too, but I'm never any place they are likely to be. I've lived on this property for 10 years (we have 10 acres) and never found a tick on any of my dogs, or the boarded dogs.
But the forest preserve areas, that's another story....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
tippy, I don't use frontline on my dogs because in 10 years we've never had a tick on any of them.
Do you think it would be worth rounding some up tomorrow and putting it on him?
 

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Check the inside of the legs,ears and under the tail where moist stays the long!.IIn France,we use Frontline and a tick collar called escalibor but needs to be taken of if the dog is swimming!.
 

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It takes 2 hours for a tick to embed itself, so if you are in an area that is either known to have ticks or that you suspect might, take a comb or brush with you and periodically run it through the coat. You should be able to remove them fairly easily before they actually are embedded.

I've never used any sort of insecticide on my dogs, and have not had any problems. I had to remind Gini and Larry all the time though, as their place has an abundance of ticks and often the dogs would come to me and I'd find several on them. BLECCCHHH :yuck:
 

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We have a lot of ticks here....and they seem to like me best. I check him and never find any attached. But its not uncommen to find a seed tick on me.

We put insecticide granuals in our yard were we reside the most. I tend to get my little seed ticks when I take Lucky across the road on the edge of a field.
 

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tippy, I don't use frontline on my dogs because in 10 years we've never had a tick on any of them.
Do you think it would be worth rounding some up tomorrow and putting it on him?
Around here, we're at Lyme ground zero and deer ticks are everywhere. Anaplasmosis is really common too, so it's a no brainer. Deer tick nymphs are so small that hunting for them visually isn't reliable enough. Even though I hate the idea of those chemicals on the dogs, TBDs are way worse than insecticide, so it's a necessary evil.
 

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Do you use any type of flea/tick repellent?
If not, it wouldn't hurt to put frontline on Tito just in case. Hopefully the two you found were the only ones on him.

I've had them all over me!!!!! The little tiny seed ticks especially. I gave up and shaved and shaved my legs since I couldn't figure out what was a freckle and what was a tick.:doh: I don't go there any more.

I thought cold weather killed the little boogers. It is the only acceptable part of winter to me.:no:

Dawn dish soap works pretty well for fleas, but I don't know if it works for ticks. Nasty, nasty little critters.
 

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It takes 2 hours for a tick to embed itself, so if you are in an area that is either known to have ticks or that you suspect might, take a comb or brush with you and periodically run it through the coat. You should be able to remove them fairly easily before they actually are embedded.
The common wisdom is that ticks have to be fully embedded to transmit Lyme, and that does take a couple of hours. However, they do start biting significantly earlier than that, sometimes within minutes, and there's some research to suggest that anaplasmosis might transmit a good deal faster.
 

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We got about twenty ticks apiece( the dogs and me too) in NH this weekend after a long summer lull. I pulled one off the nape of my neck, one from Tally's cheek, and one from Finn's neck even though the dogs are wearing frontline. I HATE the ticks but love the woods. . .
 

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We got about twenty ticks apiece( the dogs and me too) in NH this weekend after a long summer lull. I pulled one off the nape of my neck, one from Tally's cheek, and one from Finn's neck even though the dogs are wearing frontline. I HATE the ticks but love the woods. . .
It stinks. Frontline is so effective, but it takes a couple of hours to kill them, so you do see them get started sometimes before they die. They also go insane before they die (Frontline essentially eats away at their brains), so they do all kinds of weird things, like bite in nonstandard places or, my favorite, wander to the top of the dog's head and wave their legs.
 

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In CT, we see them year round, even during snowfall!
I am getting ready to move to the Springfield, MA area (the town south of Springfield), which is right by CT. I had always thought that you didn't need to use Frontline in the winter, but it sounds like that is wrong. Do you think I should treat for ticks year round? I thought they died when there was a hard frost.
 

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I am getting ready to move to the Springfield, MA area (the town south of Springfield), which is right by CT. I had always thought that you didn't need to use Frontline in the winter, but it sounds like that is wrong. Do you think I should treat for ticks year round? I thought they died when there was a hard frost.
They do seem to disappear when it's below freezing, but in our area, they reappear erratically during thaws. In coastal CT, thaws are pretty frequent. The last time I skipped the January dose, we found six in early February.

I'll probably hold off the Frontline once the temp dips below freezing reliably every night (mid-November), but I'll still keep a wary eye for them and reapply if I find even one. Then, by February, I'll start up again with a monthly dose. The dogs are in the woods at least 2-3 times a week, so if there are ticks, we find them.

It's hard, because I don't like the idea of coating the dogs in pesticide. Still, Frontline has been extensively studied and there are no verifiable health effects other than direct allergies in some dogs that occur right after application. If it causes cancer, it does so at such a small statistical rate that we haven't yet been able to measure it. TBDs (tick-borne-diseases), however, kill lots of dogs every year in CT. Lyme nephritis is terrifying, brutal, and frequently fatal. There have also been a couple of studies that suggest that Frontlined dogs actually experience less cancer than dogs who aren't given topspot pesticide treatments. There are some theories that persistent blood infections like Lyme, Erlichiosis and Anaplasmosis may actually increase rates of cancers like lymphoma. So the poison is pretty clearly the lesser of two evils.

One note on health effects: if you have two dogs and one licks the application site on the other, you can see all kinds of health problems, apparently even including seizures. You do need to keep your dogs apart for at least a day and supervise them carefully when they're together until the poison has had a chance to spread out.
 

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OK Barb, I shared my tick story with you yet you don't tell me Tito's tick! What gives?!

Yes Teddi had a tick last week, I suspect she got it from the hunt test we went to on the 10th. DH had to pull it off I can't do that. I don't "mind" bug (I HATE HATE HATE spiders) but that doesn't mean I want to handle them.

I too don't believe in insecticides on my dogs. This is my second tick in almost 30 years. I am not going to worry. I plan to discuss with our vet today, because next year we will be doing more "field" stuff, and perhaps there is a topical we can use when going out, then bathe afterward.

We used frontline once when we went to TN. I hated the mess it left on my dogs coats.
 

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Welcome to my weekend - take ticks off Max, then go back out to play in the field, take more ticks off Max. Every time we went out, I took at least 6 off him when we came back in. I take great pleasure in placing them on the floor and smashing their evil little bodies with a big orange hammer.
 

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wander to the top of the dog's head and wave their legs


Now that really gives me the heebie jeebies.:doh: I cannot erase that image from my mind.:(
 

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Even if you do use Frontline, it's wise to get SNAP 4Dx tests every six months or every year if you live in a high TBD area. SNAP 4 tests for Lyme, Anaplasmosis, and Erlichiosis, and it's a quick test your vet can usually do on site for around $40.
 

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wander to the top of the dog's head and wave their legs


Now that really gives me the heebie jeebies.:doh: I cannot erase that image from my mind.:(
It's creepy, but it makes them easy to capture. I had to put them in a Nalgene last time because I didn't have any good way to kill them out on the trail, and I prefer to kill them rather than return them to the wild, and they're durable as hell.

I got home, put a half inch of water in the Nalgene, and microwaved it. I'm not a sadistic person, but I like ticks to be very, very dead.
 
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