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I am really trying to research everything before taking the big step into puppyhood, so I was hoping I could gather some more info. My husband seems to keep arguing a large breed dog would be too hard for me handle even though we all love goldens. He keeps saying I should stick to a beagle or something around 30lbs, not 70. So here is my questions:

I read you can start training the puppy at 10 weeks. When should leash training begin? That is probably my husband's biggest worry is my handling the dog once it gets bigger on a leash by myself.

Second, does anyone take their puppy to work? I do work in an office building but by myself. I was thinking I could take the puppy with me to the office each day. There is grass around for potty trips. My schedule is generally 8:30-11:30am at office, 11:30am-1:00pm home for lunch, 1-3:30pm office, then pick up my daughter from school and home by 4pm.

What about size of house/yard for a golden? My home is a single family brick about 1400 sqft. The backyard is 20*40. I am near a large park. When is it okay to have off leash play at the park? I plan on having the dog inside with us except to potty and exercise.

Finally, how do you handle the car? I have a Mariner SUV which is new and leather. I really don't want the car destroyed. Should the dog be in a crate in the cargo area even as a puppy, in a carrier on the back seat until bigger, in a seat belt??? What do you suggest for daily car driving and on longer trips?

Thanks so much!
 

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In the Moment
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I'm 5' tall and walk and handle my 2 goldens fine. Of course the key is early and continuous training. A smaller, untrained hyper dog would be much harder to handle than a trained larger dog. Yes, your dog should be crated or have a seat belt harness for riding in the car... both for his safety and yours. The hard plastic crates would be best for the car since there have been instances of dogs impaled on the metal crates during a wreck. It should be teathered down too. Personally, we use the seatbelt harnesses with ours. Just be sure to get one that has been crash tested for safety and is padded. Many people take their dogs to work.... again the crate would be invaluable here too. Can you tell we're big crate fans?? It's an essential....... makes potty training so much easier, gives the dog a safe place when you can't be watching them, and can become their retreat when they need to get away from the hustle and bustle of a busy household.

Making a golden a member of your family is a great blessing. I can't imagine our household without a couple. As you've described, they do need to be inside with their people. Personally, ours are never left out unless we're with them. Our house is not by any means large and our yard is moderate in size. Walks are essential... and wonderful times to bond, get some exercise and away from the stress. Ours love to retrieve and we throw their "tennis" bones or frisbees numerous times/day.

Take the time to explore around the forum... there's tons of info and you'll definitely be able to feel the love we have for these special special dogs. I hope your family can experience it too.
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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All dogs should ride in a crate at all times, for their own safety.

I have a big dog van, and I don't care if mine shed and scratch it up. But, I try to be good about always crating them for safety. I drive them places every single day, sometimes several times, and I admit to occasionally laziness and just letting them all pile in.
 

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Hi! I would suggest adopting an adult, forget puppyhood! I got mine at 4 and its been amazing. And Goldens are way easier than beagles, way more willing and eager and intelligent I woudl think to learn! Go through rescue, and get your Golden there, your husband will fall madly in love just like mine did and we NEVER looked back!
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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BTW I am a stay at home mom and I take care of five dogs by myself. Husband helps a lot with the baby, though! :)
 

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Chester & Murphy's Mom
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If you have a well trained dog I don't think size should matter that much. A small untrained dog can pull you and cause problems also. I have walked two medium/large dogs by myself.
I think leash training should start the day you bring your pup home. Look around for good puppy / dog classes in your area.
I work out of my home but it would be great if at least sometimes you could bring your new pup with you to work. Maybe a crate there would also be helpful. I am sure alot of people would love to do this.
I live in a single family not large home and we now have two Goldens, both my husband and I like to walk them and we do (mostly husband ;-) at least twice a day. But we do have a fenced in backyard when just a quick trip to potty is needed. I never take my dog off leash unless we are in fenced area, I don't trust their recall and I am a worry wart
If your car is big enough I would use a crate...not so lucky here we use back seat with harness. Also backseat has carseat cover thingy I bought at petstore to keep most dirt/hair out of car.
I don't think you can go wrong with a golden and will make a great friend for your daughter.
Good luck with the husband :)
 

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RIP Sweet Skyler
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I am really trying to research everything before taking the big step into puppyhood, so I was hoping I could gather some more info. My husband seems to keep arguing a large breed dog would be too hard for me handle even though we all love goldens. He keeps saying I should stick to a beagle or something around 30lbs, not 70. So here is my questions:

I don't think I would classify Goldens as a large breed dog. While my Rusty is VERY large for a Golden my Kady is smallish and tips the scale at 55lbs.

I read you can start training the puppy at 10 weeks. When should leash training begin? That is probably my husband's biggest worry is my handling the dog once it gets bigger on a leash by myself.

There are some great trainers/breeders here that will respond to this question. Since I rescue I've never had a Golden puppy.

Second, does anyone take their puppy to work? I do work in an office building but by myself. I was thinking I could take the puppy with me to the office each day. There is grass around for potty trips. My schedule is generally 8:30-11:30am at office, 11:30am-1:00pm home for lunch, 1-3:30pm office, then pick up my daughter from school and home by 4pm.

Lucky you!!!! I'd take my whole pack to work if I could. Goldens are such "human" dogs that the more time you spend with them the happier they'll be. Don't know how much work you'll get done though. LOL

What about size of house/yard for a golden? My home is a single family brick about 1400 sqft. The backyard is 20*40. I am near a large park. When is it okay to have off leash play at the park? I plan on having the dog inside with us except to potty and exercise.

House size isn't that important because they'll be next to you and hubby 100% of the time. Goldens do need a lot of exercise and the yard sounds big enough for running off a case of "zoomies". Plan on going to the park a lot for longer exercise periods. As far as off leash - until you have 100% recall at all times then keep them onlead. Plus check local ordinances about leash or off leash.

Finally, how do you handle the car? I have a Mariner SUV which is new and leather. I really don't want the car destroyed. Should the dog be in a crate in the cargo area even as a puppy, in a carrier on the back seat until bigger, in a seat belt??? What do you suggest for daily car driving and on longer trips?

I'm really not the one to ask about that. LOL I took out all of the back seats in my PT Cruiser just so they can have more room. But I'm sure that an aftermarket company makes a liner for the back portion of your Mariner that is rubber or plastic to catch dirt/mud. I probably should use a crate when going on some of my trips with RDog but I don't.


Thanks so much!

Have Fun and I hope you get your GoldenChild
 

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Our first dog--a beagle--passed away this winter (we had her from puppyhood to agge seven). We got a golden puppy in June. Hands down, the golden has been easier on all levels. My wife, who is on crutches due to knee problems, can walk the golden--she never would have dared to do that with the beagle. I recognize that individual dogs have different temperaments, etc, but most beagles we have known are very high energy. If you get a golden puppy from a breeder, he/she can guide you toward the temperament you are seeking. Or if you rescue an older dog, its temperament is already a known quantity. Beagles also make alot of noise, which may make a beagle inappropriate for an office building, as it could disturb other tenants. My golden, on the other hand, will come to my office when she gets older, as she rarely barks and only when playying or startled.
 

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Loving goldens since '95
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Hi and welcome to the forum! I'm happy to hear that you are taking the time to do your research before bringing a puppy home :)

I believe that a golden can be the perfect dog for anyone. As with any breed (whether small, medium or large), every dog will require some training, but goldens tend to be very easy to train because they just want to please their master! :) You can start training the puppy as soon as you bring him/her home, and leash training can start right away - earlier the better! If you can find a puppy kindergarten around you, it will help tremendously - especially for a first time dog owner. There are some fantastic books to read ahead of time that will help you with housebreaking, crate training and obedience too. One that comes to mind is "Before and After getting your puppy" by Dr. Ian Dunbar.

Your set up of taking the puppy to work with you sounds perfect for the pup! Even if you could take him for just half the day that would be great, too. As for the size of the house, I don't think it makes much of a difference how big your house is, as long as the dog can get about 30-45 minutes of outdoor exercise every day. Whether it's a walk, fetching in the backyard or at an off-leash dog park.

Goldens are inside dogs, and it sounds like you've got that part understood :)

As for the vehicle, you can transport him however you are most comfortable. We drive a mid-size sedan and Molson wears a doggie harness with a seatbelt attachment in the back seat. He is more than happy with that as it gives him enough room to sit up and look out the window, lay down to sleep comfortably, turn around to face the other way, and it gives him just enough room to rest his muzzle on the front seat console when he wants to be pet :). And it also restrains him so he does not interfere with the driver.

I wish you good luck on your search and please don't be afraid to ask any other questions that come up - whether it is about breeders, clearances, training, or whatever! :)
 

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IKE- Canine Blood Donor
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I'd like to say hello and do hope that your hubby can be swayed that a golden is the dog for your family. I prefer large dogs myself and have always had large dogs. My sister had a Beagle. She was a nice enough dog but very driven by her sense of smell. Her nose took her everywhere and if there was an open door, she was gone! My other sister has Yorkies and a Golden. The Golden is much easier going and better behaved. My brother has a Collie. He's a great dog, as easily trained as my Golden, but has a hard coat to care for and is very vocal.

I don't think your home or yard size is of concern. We have a huge yard but Ike prefers walks anyway. Indoor he just lays around until it's time for the next walk. Goldens make wonderful rugs. :)

I use a harness for driving to and fro with Ike in the car. As a pup, I used a plastic crate, but he's outgrown the crate now.

I hope you're able to persuade hubby! He'll not be disappointed, Promise!
 

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Personally, I think the bigger dogs are easier to handle than the smaller ones. I even see in training classes, the bigger breeds tend to have less issues, and a more responsive. Just my observation.

With goldens, as puppies they are a lot of work, but that work pays off when they become adults!
 

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Missing Selka So Much
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I agree with all of the above.

I am partial to big dogs (even though I don't consider a golden BIG).Think they are much easier than small dogs that you can easily trip over and yap.
Definitely think goldens are the perfect dog.
Yes, they shed.and need exercise.
They are easy to train, love to please and will be devoted to you.

Sounds to me like you have the ideal situation: car, job, home, yard etc for a golden.

I highly recommend training begins as soon as puppy comes home. Crate training works quickly as long as the pup is taken out often. Take an obedience class as soon as pup has all vaccinations.

I am disabled and handle my goldens because they are trained well. That's why they make perfect service dogs. I throw a dummy or frisbee for my boys as I cannot walk far enough to walk them anymore. But they get lots of exercise that way.

I don't think I could handle a puppy again because of my disabilities : puppies (any breed) are alot of work. You need to be committed.

Is there a reason your husband thinks you would be unable to handle a golden? Is it just because of size? Any dog is a hazard if untrained! Size is not an issue. I used to walk my two together all the time. No problem till I couldn't walk far anymore.
 

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Kristy
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Well, you certainly came to the right place to get some reinforcement for your conversation with your husband. Count me as another who will say that if you are willing to work with your dog and be especially dilligent for the first 2 years you will have your husband eating his words/concerns over a bigger dog.

In my younger days, I had a 40-ish pound larger sheltie who I took to obedience classes but never followed thru with the homework at home with. He was much more trouble than my 70 lb golden, Baxter, ever was. But I worked very consistently on Baxter's obedience for the first couple years.

If you are committed, you will never regret your choice. And what an incredible blessing to be able to take your dog to work.

Please let us know what happens!!!
 

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I just wanted to add that I had to do some convincing to get Duffy, our golden. I worked on my husband for quite awhile. Now that we have had Duff for a month (he is 11 weeks), my husband couldn't be happier with him. We love him!

Kris
 

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I am really trying to research everything before taking the big step into puppyhood, so I was hoping I could gather some more info. My husband seems to keep arguing a large breed dog would be too hard for me handle even though we all love goldens. He keeps saying I should stick to a beagle or something around 30lbs, not 70. So here is my questions:

I read you can start training the puppy at 10 weeks. When should leash training begin? That is probably my husband's biggest worry is my handling the dog once it gets bigger on a leash by myself.

Second, does anyone take their puppy to work? I do work in an office building but by myself. I was thinking I could take the puppy with me to the office each day. There is grass around for potty trips. My schedule is generally 8:30-11:30am at office, 11:30am-1:00pm home for lunch, 1-3:30pm office, then pick up my daughter from school and home by 4pm.

What about size of house/yard for a golden? My home is a single family brick about 1400 sqft. The backyard is 20*40. I am near a large park. When is it okay to have off leash play at the park? I plan on having the dog inside with us except to potty and exercise.

Finally, how do you handle the car? I have a Mariner SUV which is new and leather. I really don't want the car destroyed. Should the dog be in a crate in the cargo area even as a puppy, in a carrier on the back seat until bigger, in a seat belt??? What do you suggest for daily car driving and on longer trips?

Thanks so much!
Welcome, of course I think you've made the best choice of dogs!! As some others have said, I think my goldens are much easier to live with and handle than many smaller dogs I have been around.

We have a 9mth. old who is our second Golden. We had him in puppy class at 14 weeks but starting using the leash as soon as we brought him home at 8 weeks. Another option is getting an older dog.

I took our first Golden, Jake, to work with me often and have started taking Cody also. Jake just slept under the desk with an occasional foray around the office to make sure he wasn't missing anything! He did like to greet people who came in. :) I have a crate in the office for Cody and usually bring him back with me after lunch.

I have a Volvo XC90 and keep a crate in the cargo area for Cody.

Good luck and let us know what you and your husband decide.
 

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Welcome to the forum!!

Firstly, not all Goldens are 70+ pounds! I have 2 adult males, one is 70ish lbs, the other tops the scale at about 55 lbs soaking wet!

Secondly, I am 5'2" and a self proclaimed weakling and I can handle both my dogs just fine on my own. Early training is key, and there are tools you can use to help if you have a leash-puller like no-pull harnesses, that can be invaluable and make walks so much more enjoyable for human and dog!

Always seatbelt or crate your dog in the car! We use seatbelts for ours. I believe there are harness/seatbelts that can hook onto the rings in the cargo area of your SUV if you don't want the dog on the backseat.

Lastly, you don't need much room for a Golden.. in my experience I could have a giant mansion and they'd still be within a 2 foot radius of me most of the time LOL I live in a VERRRRY small 2 bedroom house, less than 1000 sq feet. I do have quite a large backyard, but its not necessary. Goldens will want to be near you all the time, and as long as you make the commitment to give them ample exercise in the form of walks, dog park trips, fetch games, etc, that's all they need!
 

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I'm going to play devil's advocate here for a minute. If your husband has concerns about the large size of a golden, you BOTH need to be on board about getting a puppy. Even with training, when a golden youngster hits adolescence, the humans need patience, consistency, more patience and a great sense of humor. Most of these dogs are buttheads as teenagers, but you can minimize the acting out with lots and lots of training and consistency. If your husband would be frustrated and angry finding something chewed on or being blown off when he asks the pup to come or having the pup jump on your guests, you may want to consider an adult golden, especially a rescue. Just something to think about while you're doing your research:)
 

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My husband seems to keep arguing a large breed dog would be too hard for me handle even though we all love goldens. He keeps saying I should stick to a beagle or something around 30lbs, not 70.

Having owned a beagle and a golden I'll tell you the Beagle was a million times harder to train - whether it be training to walk nicely on a leash, house breaking, recall, basic obedience like sit and down... let's just say we didn't get very far with her training. My golden (I got her as an adult dog) was a breeze! I'm 4'11" with complicated joint problems (essentially my shoulders dislocate on a regular basis along with most of my other joints) so being able to handle a large dog was a concern for me. With some training I was able to stop Milly from pulling, and she has been such a breeze to train - a very fast learner and like all goldens very willing to please! My only concern size wise is if she were to ever be seriously hurt I can no longer lift her (since my surgery... I could lift her when I got her). So that's something to think about. Milly is a big female at just around 65 lbs.


I read you can start training the puppy at 10 weeks. When should leash training begin? That is probably my husband's biggest worry is my handling the dog once it gets bigger on a leash by myself.

So long as you are willing to take your time and have lots of patience training (including leash training and basic obedience) can begin at 8 weeks when you get your puppy. I highly suggest enrolling in a puppy kindergarten as soon as you get the puppy to get a jump start on the training and for optimum socialization for your pup.


Second, does anyone take their puppy to work? I do work in an office building but by myself. I was thinking I could take the puppy with me to the office each day. There is grass around for potty trips. My schedule is generally 8:30-11:30am at office, 11:30am-1:00pm home for lunch, 1-3:30pm office, then pick up my daughter from school and home by 4pm.

I take Milly to work (she's an adult dog though), but when/if I get a puppy she'll come into work too. I have a very dog friendly boss which is great! I will say I've found Milly can only lay still without wanting stimulation from me for about 6 hours... after that she wants attention and gets a little restless. My solution is I'll either bring her in in the morning and take her home at lunch, or bring her in after lunch for a few hours. With a little puppy I wouldn't make them have to sit quietly for a full work day, but a few hours would be great (with breaks for brief play/potty, of course).

What about size of house/yard for a golden? My home is a single family brick about 1400 sqft. The backyard is 20*40. I am near a large park. When is it okay to have off leash play at the park? I plan on having the dog inside with us except to potty and exercise.

Goldens are extremely adaptable dogs and have no problems living in small apartments, so long as they get plenty of exercise. I had an apartment when I first got Milly. Walks on leash, playing fetch in your yard, some play time in the yard, walks at the park are all great. As far as off leash at the park - is it fenced in? Is it away from roads? If it is than off leash play is okay, if not than it's better to stay on-leash at the park. Swimming is also great excercise for dogs so if you live near water that's an added bonus!

Finally, how do you handle the car? I have a Mariner SUV which is new and leather. I really don't want the car destroyed. Should the dog be in a crate in the cargo area even as a puppy, in a carrier on the back seat until bigger, in a seat belt??? What do you suggest for daily car driving and on longer trips?

The safest way to travel with a dog is to have them in a crate. I have a station wagon and keep Milly in the cargo area... about 50% of the time she is crated and 50% she is loose in the cargo area if I'm being lazy. I do have a dog grate in my car that seperates her from the seats - this is a bit safer than being totally loose in the car, but not as safe as being crated or in a seatbelt harness. I allow the cargo area to get dog hair on it, and it does, but the hair doesn't seem to travel to the seats which is great! I have given up on keeping the rear window of my car clean - it is covered in nose smudge marks. Dog claws do scratch leather seats as I learned on my old car (a sedan). I love having the cargo area as the dog place, because now I'm not embarrassed if someone sits in the backseat and don't fear they'll get dog hair all over them.
 

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When I was 21 I bought myself a Turbo sports car - red.

You should have heard all the guys I knew then whispering - "she will never be able to handle that car." I drove that car for 120,000 miles.

I am thinking that is what your husband has in mind.

I think it is a male ego thing. ;)
 

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Susan
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I took my puppy to work. I got him in the fall and kept him in his crate in my car and would take him out to potty every hour or so at first. When he got old enough to go 3 hours (I work 9-12, 2-5) I started keeping him inside the office with me. Most days we go to the dog park at lunch.
 
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