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Chloe's Mom
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Hello. I have tried, tried, and tried to brush Chloe. She will NOT stop biting me. I have given her her bully stick, toys, etc. So now I have to resort to a muzzle. Has anyone ever had to do this? I'm hoping that she will learn that she needs to not bite me when she is getting brushed. Any advice would be great! Thanks.
 

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What type of brush are you using? Neither of my dogs are thrilled about it buy usually a little love and belly rubs during and after and they are willing to put up with me LOL
 

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The best advice I ever heard was to smear peanut butter on the fridge or somewhere that you can easily clean it off, and let her lick it off while you brush her or trim her nails. It totally worked for us with Jack as a pup to get him used to the Dremel for his nails.
 

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Chloe's Mom
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Discussion Starter #4
A soft brush. I have tried SEVERAL different kinds of brushes, trust me. lol She hates ALL of THEM! I will try the peanut butter idea.
 

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Remy's Mom!
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That peanut butter idea sounds great... We used peanut butter smeared on the side of the bathtub because Remy hated baths so much when he was younger. He doen't love them now but tolerates them just fine.

For brushing (which he didn't like either) we had one person brush him while the other person fed treats and praised him. I've heard to damp them before brushing so we would bring out the spray bottle and he loves trying to eat the water so that made it fun for him too. We have fun time before and after but he has to be calm while brushing! Good luck!!!
 

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The best advice I ever heard was to smear peanut butter on the fridge or somewhere that you can easily clean it off, and let her lick it off while you brush her or trim her nails. It totally worked for us with Jack as a pup to get him used to the Dremel for his nails.
That's a really good idea, I will have to try this.

Thanks!
 

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Wyatt Earp
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My Cody always tried to grab the brush. I think they are just playing. It always took 2 people to brush him. But my groomer said he never had a problem.....go figure.:doh:

Wyatt loooooves to be brushed thank goodness.
 

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Also, make sure the brush isn't hurting her. We had a slicker brush for Jack initially and we realized it was probably hurting him! We started using a comb and a gentler pin brush and he loves it now. If we bring out the brush he rolls over to have his tummy done...it's pretty cute.
 

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With Ben I do a stroke of the brush followed by a stroke with my hand. He doesn't like it when I do his tail and backs of his legs, so I usually rub his belly while doing those. I always end with a treat. It helps.

Another possibility is to do what we did when we had to give him ear drops for a month or so: we followed the drops with his walk, so he got excited when he saw the ear drop bottle because he learned that it meant the walk was coming.
 

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I use a treat that Ace really likes and hold it in one hand and brush him with the other. I move my hand around depending on what part of him I'm trying to brush. It works great for me!
 

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Dog Lover for Life
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I try to brush after a walk so he is more mellow.
My older Male (Bogart) loves his brushings, it's great one on one time.
He gets a treat every time he changes positions for me.
Cooper I feed a treat and he gets more patient with me but he still isn't quiet there yet. He is not even 6 months old now.
I use a slicker brush and a comb and that has always worked well for my Goldens. My Australian Cattle dog didn't like it she had shorter fur.
 

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My advice is that you need to step back and start fresh. The most important thing is baby steps and moving at a pace dictated by Chloe. Treats and positive associations are very important. Chloe needs to build a new association with grooming time is fun, happy experience that results in belly rubs and treats.

Take the muzzle off and start slowly, by just placing the brush in the same room as Chloe, next have her approach you (her decision) to receive a treat while you hold the brush or have it in your lap, slowly start placing the brush closer to her (lots of treats), work up to the point where the brush can touch her (don't brush her, just a touch). Slowly build to one stroke and treat and so on and so forth.

The most important points are:
- Remolding brushing to positive, happy experience, with high value treats
- Pay attention to Chloe and as soon as she shows signs of being uncomfortable, step back and stop. She needs to be comfortable and ready to move on to the next step otherwise you are setting her up for failure.
- Utilise high value treats. But don not bribe, just reward the behavior you desire (relaxed, calm, happy dog).

With determination and hard work you grooming can become a happy experience for both of you! Good luck!

Also as Bogart mentioned, working with a well exercised dog makes life easier.
 

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The best advice I ever heard was to smear peanut butter on the fridge or somewhere that you can easily clean it off, and let her lick it off while you brush her or trim her nails. It totally worked for us with Jack as a pup to get him used to the Dremel for his nails.
This is what I do and it works great! Yogurt also works!
 

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I find it's easier to brush JJ, my 5 month old Golden Retriever, when we're sitting outside on the front steps. He seems to be more relaxed outside, just sitting there taking in the sights, smells and sounds. This is when I can easily pull out a brush and brush him, without any treats even.

Brushing him inside wasn't as easy at first, but I learned to hold his patience with treats.

First, I had to introduce him to the brush by letting him sniff it out. I even used it on myself a few times before doing so on him, just to show him what it's used for and that it's not a toy to play with. Whenever he started biting at it, I would tell him to leave it. After about 3-4 days of this, I started to brush him with it. It was a process getting him use to it, but not one that was all that hard.

When it's time for him to get brushed, I tell him "time to get brushed". Then I put him in a "sit" as I stand in front of him. He gets a treat for doing so as I sit on the floor in front on him. I put a couple treats behind me on the floor, which he knows, of course, are there. If he jumps for them, I grab them and stand up real quick and put him in a "sit", again, and repeat the process. Once he's sitting nicely without going for the treats behind my back, I start to comb him. If he turns his head and goes for my hand or the brush. I stop, instantly and tell him no. After a few seconds I try again, if he can maintain a straight face and no biting for 2 seconds, he gets a treat, if he can keep it going for 6 seconds, he gets another treat, 10 seconds, another treat. Basically, a treat every 4 seconds until I'm done. If at any time he goes for my hand or the brush, I stop and give him a few seconds to realize what he did, why I stopped and why he didn't get a treat.

I am now pleased to say that I can brush JJ without any problems (for the most part at least). He knows if he sits there and behaves until I'm done, he'll be rewarded. I did the same thing when it came to drying him off with a towel and with that too he'll just sit there until we're done. I don't even have to use the treats anymore when it comes to towel drying.
 
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