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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if dogs such as Goldens can have hyperactivity similar to the condition in humans? My one year old Golden is extremely energetic and never seems to get tired - not even really long walks every day seem to help, she constantly pulls on the leasth and when I let her run free in the park, she is like a bolt of lightening... :eek:

Is someone else here experiencing similar problem?

Cherry
 

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Open up a book on Golden Retrievers and it would say something like this:

"The golden retriever is a strong, active and well-balanced dog possessing a kindly expression. The golden retriever is both alert and self-confident, yet gentle in manner. The golden retriever is very friendly and loyal, a trustworthy companion. The golden retriever is neither shy nor hyperactive."

I would think that main reason of your dog being hyperactive is that Goldens need companionship of humans and if deprived of this, they can become very hyperactive. This happens if the whole family is working during the day and puppie or adult golden retriever is left home alone.
Just make sure you give her a long walk outside every day and as a time goes she will settle down. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks goldenluv, but the thing is that I go with her for really long walks to get the much needed exercise for her, that's why I was wondering that she might be hyperactive... ?
 

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Hi Cherry

My sister has a golden lab that is definately hyperactive! She runs about chasing her tail and constantly wants attention, but then again i would say my sister is a bit hyperactive too, so i think the dog is trying to fit in with her! (sorry sis if your reading!!) The dogs spends most of the day at the top of the stairs rolling a ball down at her and she spends most of the day throwing the ball back up at the dog, its hilarious!
 

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Please don't think that I'm the ultimate authority or that I want to be. I have had many years of loving and training dogs and I know that sometimes hyperactivity in dogs results from a lack of training and assertiveness from their master. I believe that most hyperactivity in dogs can be reduced by some intensive training (not harsh treatment and certainly no physical contact).

Your dog is an animal. It will always be an animal. And if someone expects their dog to be anything other than an animal they and the dog are in for a rocky road and much disappointment. Dogs act on instinct most of the time and they have a rich heritage of living in packs where there is only one boss. They understand that and are very comfortable fitting into a pack where there is a single and firm leader. We've all heard about the ALPHA dog. Alpha dogs aren't always pleasant or lovey-dovey to the other members of a pack.

I don't want to go much deeper into this subject but if I were you I would enroll in a K9 obedience class very soon. They will teach you how to become the alpha in your pack. This will most certainly reduce the amount of hyperactivity in most dogs. Usually when a dog displays hyperactivity there is something wrong in their every day lives. They need guidance from someone or something.

Here's the silver lining in this little exercise. Goldens are probably the easiest dogs in the world to train. Once you convince a Golden that you are the alpha and that you will not tolerate one second of bad behavoir they will slip gracefully into their position in the "family" hierarchy and love you even more for being the loving, yet firm, caretaker of the pack. Of course, you can expect a dog to test you once in a while so be firm, be fair, and most importantly be consistent with your discipline. Discipline is not punishment. Punishment is something that must happen after a wrong deed is done. Discipline is what happens early on to avoid those wrong deeds.

Sit down and be quiet Boogity. O.K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks! That really helps - both to see that I'm not alone or crazy and that the training is probably necessary. I've been thinking about it for a while, but it is probably a bit pricey, right? Do you think that for something like this a private session training or group sessions training (cheaper option probably) is better? I'm not even sure how she'd behave with all the other dogs in the group session - I might be a bit embarrassed if we're the worst there :( .
How soon would I see results - how long does such obedience training usually last?
 

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Our Brady is quite the bundle of energy, so you are not alone! He just turned 1 year, and even after 6-8 hours of romping with his friends at doggie daycare, he still has energy to play at home! So, the long walk you're doing probably is not enough. Do you have a fenced yard or some place she can safely run off-leash? They do need to run and be a little crazy, and having another dog to play with can help release a lot of that energy too. As for the leash pulling, that's another issue and I agree with previous posts that you should get her into obedience training ASAP...you will see an amazing transformation if you devote the time to formally train her. My suggestion for your first class is to go to a group class. The socialization with the other dogs will be good for her.
 
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