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rescued golden retriever
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Frankie is our rescued golden who we've had for three weeks today. Last night she was doing a wet heave, but not producing anything. I attributed this to her eating grass (still don't get why dogs do this). Anyway, at 1am she was pacing and wanted outside, which isn't like her. I let her out and when she didn't come back for a few minutes I put on my snow gear and headed out after her.

Frankie was in the back of the yard where some fresh grass is. I called her and she looked at me for a minute before finally coming inside. I stayed up with her all night and she slept by my side. She still didn't want to come upstairs but maybe it's cooler downstairs?

Anyway, she is playing with our other dogs, ate her breakfast and drank water, went potty just fine. How can I tell bloat from her just eating something bad? She still has done the weird regurgitation thing but produces nothing. Could it be from the grass? Frightened mom here but don't want to spend $500 on the vet when my dog is running around just like normal.
 

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rescued golden retriever
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oh, also, she eats laying down. I've never seen a dog do this. So, should I get her a raised feeder? I read they are bad, but maybe the laying down is worse.
 

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Inactive
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11,326 Posts
Sometimes kennel cough sounds like a weird vomit noise, and it even produces foam and slime. So it could be that.

I wrote up a list of symptoms of abdominal stress a while back, so I'll post it here just in case:


Some ways of telling the difference between a few pukes and a real problem:

Check the gums. You need to check the gums regularly while he's healthy so you know what color is normal for him. Paler than normal can mean dehydration, low blood pressure, or trouble breathing. Dry, sticky gums (instead of wet and slick) can mean dehydration. Brick red gums can mean heat stroke or the early stages of bloat. Blue means the dog isn't getting enough oxygen. White or grey gums are an emergency either with blood flow or oxygen. You can also test blood pressure by pressing the gum firmly for three seconds and then removing your finger. The spot you pressed should return to normal color in 1-2 seconds. Longer means lower blood pressure.

Other things that differentiate a serious problem from a little puking:
  • if the dog is hunched up,
  • experiencing pain in the abdomen,
  • experiencing distention in the abdomen,
  • is unwilling to move,
  • has trouble getting up or staying standing,
  • is lethargic,
  • has dull eyes,
  • appears anxious,
  • is yawning over and over,
  • is drooling abnormally,
  • is foaming,
  • is pacing,
  • is hiding in a safe place,
  • is standing with his legs wider than normal, staring ahead or at the floor,
  • or is puking or gagging on and off over the course of several hours or for more than a handful of times in a row.

Those are all signs of anxiety and/or abdominal problems. Bloat is the most common and serious problem associated with repeated puking and/or gagging. Obstruction gives you a little more time to do something about it, but is also common and sometimes fatal.

Remember, pooping is a good sign, but it doesn't prove the dog isn't obstructed.
 

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rescued golden retriever
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow, thank you for such a thorough response. Sometimes you google something and everything becomes a symptom of exactly what you're worried about. We have nice pink gums, fairly normal behavior (for a golden, ha ha) and so I think we're going to be okay. I may keep her with us for Thanksgiving though just in case.
 

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Daisy - my heart
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12,575 Posts
I only have one dreadful experience with bloat. Well, actually three over the course of one weekend. Daisy's distress and need for emergency care was unmistakable -- there was no guessing, no waiting, no wondering. I knew she was in trouble.

She was trying to throw up but couldn't, she was panicked, she couldn't settle, stomach rock hard and swollen. I can honestly say it was beyond clear to me that she was in big trouble.

So it's my experience if a dog has bloat, they are not going to be engaging in any type of otherwise normal behavior like playing, eating, and drinking or just lounging around.

Good you're asking questions about bloat though. I do think you'd recognize it immediately if you saw it. I did.
 

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My Beau had bloat years ago. I agree with JoEllen on their demeanor. He was very restless, dry heaving and his stomach was very hard and distended. Luckily I knew the signs from seeing a show on Animal Planet about it. He had to have the surgery as his stomach had turned. Dogs that are experiencing bloat will not want to do anything else but to stop the pain from it. Here is a thread about about bloat.
http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com...siology-breed-standard/68880-bloat-chart.html
 

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Dog Lover
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Tippy

I agree with everyhting that JoEllen, Tippykayak and BeauShel posted.
I would add that with the Bloat, Gizmo and Snobear would NOT EAT OR DRINK
and if the gums are whitish or very pale that is a warning sign, too!!


if you vet is not open, you need to get them to an EMERGENCY VET, IMMEDIATELY. I think you have about an hour!!

http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com...siology-breed-standard/68880-bloat-chart.html
 

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Some dogs are prone to dry heaving in the morning from having an empty stomach. I heard that giving some treats at bedtime, may be enough to food to keep in their stomachs overnight to prevent this.
 

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rescued golden retriever
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You guys are so amazing and supportive! Thanks to each of you for taking a moment to reply. I was so shell shocked to hear about bloat it's what immediately came to mind. My husband wonders if perhaps, when Frankie went outside, she had a seizure. I know hiding can be a seizure symptom too, and we already have Frankie on seizure meds. I'm going to keep my eye on Frankie but I do think she's okay. She's certainly able to play with her tennis ball and harass the guide dog puppy well enough.

Again, I really appreciate you addressing my concern with respect. I feel like such a worrier but I fell in love with this dog the moment i heard about her. Even though it's been just three weeks she's the perfect fit for our family. So, thank you!
 

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rescued golden retriever
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, I think I know what all this was leading up to. Frankie just had her first large seizure since she's been with us. It was very sad, but we got through it. She's already on medication so we'll keep an eye on her and see how she does the rest of the day. Poor Frankie.
 

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rescued golden retriever
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Frankie is doing good. She ended up having a seizure and then another six days later. She's still on meds, so that's helping her I'm sure. Now I know some warning signs though.
 
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