Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. We are thinking of getting a new golden puppy. What can we do to teach them both to share toys and food? Our current golden doesn’t resource guard with humans but does not like to share balls or Kongs with other dogs (will growl or bark) so for now we just avoid those situations. How have you encouraged your dogs to share with other dogs and not feel threatened? Our dog likes to eat his food and treats throughout the day so there’s always food in his bowl and treats like bully sticks and toys laying around and a new puppy will definitely be interested in taking his things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,945 Posts
We need to keep in mind that 'sharing' is a human concept/expectation, 'not sharing', especially high value items such as food items is a natural basic survival instinct for a dog. In the dog world the rule of possession - 'I have it, it is mine, unless or until I leave it behind' is 'understood' by socially appropriate dogs. 'Stealing' something is rude behavior, a fundamental transgression in the dog world, and likely to be met with aggressive displays - stiffness, growling, snapping - should the dog who 'has' decide it is worth doing what he needs to do to keep it. In dog to dog situations we need to keep in mind that the dog decides the 'value' of the item to them at that moment in time, and that that item may increase in 'value' should another dog indicate that he wishes to have it.
While we can work with our dogs to help them understand the concept of sharing, we need to keep in mind that it does not come naturally to them, we need to keep our expectations realistic and stay mindful of their natural instincts.


https://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/what-to-do-if-your-dog-wont-share-his-toys

quote from the article: Unfortunately, there’s a pervasive myth that resource guarding is the result of a dog trying to exert dominance. As a result, well-meaning pet parents believe they need to be confrontational with their resource guarding dogs in order to gain “control” over them and force them into submission. But because the behavior is actually rooted in insecurity and the dog feeling unsafe or unsure in his environment, this approach is highly dangerous and ineffective, often lead- ing to the behavior getting worse. A confrontational approach only serves to validate the dog’s insecurity and can get people snapped at or bitten.

https://www.clickertraining.com/node/3339
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,636 Posts
I think you would probably have to make some changes. As Charliethree says, "sharing" is a human concept, not a dog concept.


We have two dogs. Their food bowls are some distance apart in the kitchen. We feed them at the same time and remove the bowls when mealtime is over, even if there's still food left (which is hardly ever the case for us). From the outset, we taught the puppy not to approach the other dog's bowl. We were very strict about it, and still are (the "puppy" is four years old now). We also never, ever leave high value treats lying around. I no longer buy things like bully sticks or other long-lasting chews because of the potential for problems. We have Nylabones and similar items for chewing, and a box of toys to which they have free access. The toy box works because the toys aren't "high value" items for our dogs (tugs, stuffies, etc.). If your dog considers certain items to be "high value", I would recommend that you take them away, at least for a few months until the dogs have learned to live with one another.



Spats are inevitable. Your resident dog may or may not like the puppy at first, and will probably growl and snap to correct its behaviour. This is normal; you have to let them sort things out, while keeping a close eye on them to make sure the pup doesn't get hurt. Sometimes things go smoothly and the dogs like one another from the start. Sometimes they don't. Every time we've brought a new pup into the house, it's been different. Back in the day, we had a resident female Labrador and got a female Golden pup. The Labrador didn't like the pup for a while, but tolerated her, and by the time the pup was about four months old they got on famously and were great friends and playmates until the Labrador died at age 14. Our last introduction didn't go quite as well. Our resident male poodle hated our new male Golden pup on sight. "Hate" is not too strong a word: he would attack the pup if it even came into the same room as him. We had to keep a very close eye on them for several months. Over time the poodle became more accepting and the they are friends now - they share a bed in my office and can even eat out of the same bowl - but it was a long process: I would say at least six months before we started to think that it would work out. Even now, four years later, I still don't leave them loose together if I go out. One of them is always crated. I have a friend with two female wire fox terriers, and they have never learned to live together even though it's been several years since she got the younger one. They are never, ever loose together in the house, even if humans are present, because they fight.
 

·
the party's crashing us
Joined
·
4,174 Posts
Dogs don't share.

They are opportunistic scavenger carnivores.

They don't share.

You're going to have to change the way you manage the household. No more free feeding. It's impossible with multiple dogs. No more high value treats/chews laying around (pigs ears, rawhide,bully sticks, etc).

I would be EXTREMELY careful with the new puppy around your older dog and any food or toys. In fact, you really ought to keep them separated if you suspect your older dog could resource guard one of these items. One little nip and your 8 week old puppy doesn't have an eye anymore. Take it seriously.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,203 Posts
We acquired Rocky about 2 years ago. Rocky was 8 weeks old and Max was 7 years old and over 100 pounds. Max tolerated Rocky, and today has kind of grudgingly accepts him. We feed them about 5 feet apart. They do play some now. Rocky is now 73 pounds, but Max is still around 50 pounds heavier. Max is the alpha, and Rocky knows it. Fortunately, Max has never coveted any toys; Rocky, on the other hand, has a toy box and plays with all the toys. Occasionally, when Max gets excited he will grab a toy from Rocky. The good news is that the two dogs get along and do night fight with each other. Be cautious if you bring another dog into the household.
 

·
INSTAGRAM: golden_lilyy_
Joined
·
286 Posts
i agree with the others, sharing is a human term. when i introduced my 2nd dog into the household (a little puppy chihuahua!), he got away with everything. Lily my girl could be chewing yak bone, and he would gnaw at the end and she would tolerate it. i always made sure to supervise of course.

Eventually my chihuahua started to 'bully' lily and attempt to steal the item and dash off with the entire thing. this resulted in lily giving him a sharp correction, barking & growling. she only had to do this once and he never stole from her again. now they both respect each other's space when they have high value treats. basically they established the order themselves.

i never give them chews unsupervised (as that is also dangerous, in case of choking etc). their preferred 'chew spots' are actually right next to each other and they chew side by side! they also eat side by side and never cross over to the other's bowls unless they have left it. i've never had any guarding with toys though, as charlie will actively take toys and drop them in front of lily to initiate tug of war or play that is super cute.

ultimately you as the owner has to monitor the situation and remove items that you think might be guarded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Just to pile on, multi dog households require more management than a single dog. If you have a resource guarder then it will require even more management to make sure everyone stays safe.

My dogs eat separately. If they get a Kong or high value chew it is in the crate with the door shut. Puzzle toys and snuffle mats are in separate rooms with a gate up so no one wanders in on the other. I also have an open toy bin. My younger dog will take squeaky toys from the older one to try to get her to play with him. She seems to have fun with that game so I haven’t discouraged it. If she was upset by it I would change the way we managed it.

I was very strict when we had 4 dogs one of whom was a resource guarder with other dogs. I only have 2 now and both are very easy going so things are more relaxed. When we get a golden puppy next year things will get strict again until I have a good idea of how everyone interacts. I think you need to tailor your management to the dogs involved. But if you already know your dog will guard items then you need to have tight control of high value items.

If you are thinking of getting a puppy soon, you can start helping your dog by going to meals and controlling access to chews before the puppy arrives. Then he won’t have to deal with new resource management and a new puppy at the same time.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top