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Kate
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Oh yep. Dalmations some of them have problems. :)

Sat next to a pretty active obedience judge around here in MI at a trial and she pointed at a male dalmation (GCH dog too) and said she would not turn her back on that dog with other dogs around especially back then when they still had regular stays. What I saw with him... there was a lot of male dominance issues. He did not like other males at all.

In conformation classes it's really only been a big male doberman that what I saw simply HATED golden retrievers and twice tried going after my Jovi who is like a big stuff animal of sweetness and had no idea thank goodness....
 

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Discussion Starter #22
The Border Collie breed, sadly, is full of fear reactivity. I love them, they are my heart breed, but they are a mess. I would say that greater than 50% of the BCs I've met are fear reactive towards dogs, humans or both and at least 80% resource guard. It's a shame. If you ask me, I think this came from some rather...unscrupulous...to say the least breeding of the breed in Australia and NZ and those dogs getting exported all over the world to add into conformation breeding programs. Not to say that working dogs don't have the same issues, I have just done less pedigree research because most working BCs aren't registered with the AKC and their pedigrees are a little harder to track.

It sounds like Bertie is a wonderful dog though! One slip up I think can happen, but a pattern of behavior is something to be concerned about. We have a Dalmation bitch in our handling class that is very reactive/dog aggressive and while her handler is wonderful, I think the bitch should be retired. She lunges at the other dogs and not in a playful way. I know the breed has had problems before and its unfortunate that this behavior is permitted.
BCs used to be one of the best breeds. That is sad. They are also used as pets more often than for herding. Herding dogs need to use that energy in some way or it can become destructive. also, farm dogs don’t need to be as social as pets dogs that interact with people and dogs more often.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
In response to Dbl and Megora

It's a shame that the breeders and owners aren't made aware :( When I was deciding on another breed, I had a really hard time deciding between GSD and Golden. I've wanted a GSD for a LONG time, but the reactivity is all over the place with that breed. In my current breed, a veterinary behaviorist studying noise sensitivity suspects that more than 50% of the BCs in the US are noise reactive. I really wanted a dog from breeding that I wanted to be able to take to parks, around small children, around other dogs, on boats, etc without the dog becoming reactive or fearful and I'm so happy we decided to get a Golden.

Watching some of the dogs in the show ring, at Crufts the Mal was fearful and at Westminster the Irish Water Spaniel had a moment, and yet, judges are hesitant to excuse a dog. I think part of it, much like the rest of the standard, is up to owner interpretation. Maybe some breeders are comfortable with aggression here or there as long as its not noticeable and/or manageable.
German Shepherds need good early handling. Some lines and dogs are more forgiving of training mistakes than others. It takes about three years to fully train and get them to that mellow sweet spot people most often associate with the breed. By age 5, they should be completely past the difficult stages. That is much longer than most breeds. They need consistent handling and training. They also need continued training, as they learn quickly but also “forget.” Working lines are also problem solvers, so if they see something as a problem they will train themselves. Inexperienced owners don’t understand that. some reactivity is inbred, but it’s only a tendency. If they are trained well and socialized and exposed to dogs and people they will be less reactive as adults.
 

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I occasionally trained with a lady who had a rottweiler and I loved that dog but would never have let my golden show in the obedience ring with him. He was very curious about goldens and could not do the sit/stay without getting up and going straight over to a golden in the group. One golden tore in to him and that was it for me. We were going for the same title on our dogs and I made sure this particular dog was not in the show. The rottweiler was a big baby and has his GCH but he was big and strong.
 
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