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I found some tips on how to pick a golden retriever puppy:


-Walk away from the puppy. It should follow you.
-Talk to the puppy. It should listen to you.
-Roll a ball for the puppy, should chase it.
-Pinch puppy's ear or skin between its toes. (Puppy that yips will likely be easier to train)
-Flip puppy onto its back and hold for a minute. Puppy should wiggle a minute, then give in.


Hey forum members, any thoughts or any advice?
Can someone add little more to this list?

maya
 

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Hi Maya, thanks for the post.
What if all the puppies respond well (I know all of ours do that already and they're only 4 weeks old)? ;) Most of the time I think you just really fall in love with a certain one naturally... and kind of choose according to your own personality as well...

Vierka
 

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maya said:
I found some tips on how to pick a golden retriever puppy:


-Walk away from the puppy. It should follow you.
-Talk to the puppy. It should listen to you.
-Roll a ball for the puppy, should chase it.
-Pinch puppy's ear or skin between its toes. (Puppy that yips will likely be easier to train)
-Flip puppy onto its back and hold for a minute. Puppy should wiggle a minute, then give in.


Hey forum members, any thoughts or any advice?
Can someone add little more to this list?

maya
Hi Maya,
Flip puppy on it's back is my all time favorite...there are lots of others, but I always base my decision on this one. If you find a good breeder, they should be really watching and analyzing from day one of pup's life. They will help match a puppy to your lifestyle/home. And then it is always fun to see which one you "click" with. Many times, I find it is the one I have already had designated.
Happy Puppy Picking!!
Tricia
 

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We also waited until the puppies were busy and threw a HUGE set of keys down on the floor. The bully puppy was the first to hide. The runt (our dog) was one of the only dogs who went to investigate (once he got over being startled) and that's also what you want.
 

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The best way is to talk to the breeder. Some breeders don't let you choose. They ask what your home conditions are like, how much activity the dog will have, do you have kids, how much experience you have with dogs, etc., and they will choose the best dog for you. The problem with some of the methods listed is you don't know what the puppies have been doing all day. If one puppy is just waking up while another has been playing for the last hour, you will get different results which will have nothing to do with the temperment of the pup.
 

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When the lady for the services dog place was here to pick out her pups from my litter she did several things to pick her pups.
First she didn't pick the most outgoing, or the one that came to her first. These pups are normal the most dominate and are harder to train.
She got them real interested in a toy across the room from her then called, she wanted to see how quick they would leave something the were into, and come to her.
She threw a ball, and called the pups back to her, to see which was the quickest to catch on that if they gave up the ball they got a treat.
she would hold treats in her hands and then call the pups and see who would give direct eye contact and hold it.
she fliped them on there back, and see who would submit.
she also grabed a hand full of their fur skin and held it tight to see who would try to bit, as the people they went to help would need to do that to help get back up if they fell out of there wheelchairs.
but the main thing was who would leave what they were interested in and come back and pay attention the her. that showed that they would listen and be easier to train for what she need them to do.
 

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When you are going to get a new pup, you should have a good idea of what you want out of a ""DOG""!!!

Is it not only going to be the family/personal pet, but are you going to show or trial this ""DOG""--is this ""DOG"" going to be within a busy household, or an older household??

The temperments of goldens do differ, there are very docile, couch potato natured and also high energy!!!

The coat plays a big role also, there are heavy coats, medium coat, and a thinner lighter coat, (the latter usually is in the feild bred, and they tend to be high energy)

Then there is size, granted we do have a standard for the breed, but there is different bone type, the larger the bone, the more dog.

This list is endless actually, but give a good idea of what that cute little fluffy pup is going to grow up to be and you must research the lines and look at as many of the offsprings that are available if possibe as adults now, these things help tremendously on determining what you will possible have as an adult!!
 

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The excercises referred to above are from the Volhard Puppy Aptitude testing method. You can do a search on the internet and find the details. Basically, it's a set of things you do, and then rate the puppy numerically based on his response. At the end of the test, you can see what type of personality the puppy is most likely to exhibit as an adult. I've heard that this is very accurate.

Unfortunately, we had to pick our pup at four weeks, so she was too young for the testing...so we picked the girl who seemed the most laid back and didnt wander as much. Also, the breeder commented on the fact that typically the larger pups of the litter are more laid back as puppies and adults...because they didnt have to fight so hard to get mama's milK!
 

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Isn't that interesting.....my guy was the runt of the litter and he's very laid-back. Mind, by the time we brought him home he was the second largest. He's still only a little guy, though.
 

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How to pick a Golden Retriever puppy.

The first and most important task, probably the most difficult, selecting a reputable breeder, unfortunately this is where I failed. My breeder had prominent hip dysplasia in two litters. Unfortunately one opf those dogs was mine. The surgery was extremely successful the cost $4,800.00. So be sure that the breeder has records of the dogs he has produced, that the breeding stock is OFA hip certified, accept notheing less that "Excellent" rating.
 

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Not only hip certs. but shoulder and eye certs. are also extremely important, I teach agility and the shoulders are just as important for certs, what goes up must come down!!!!
 

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While I agree 100% about getting the health clearances of the dam and sire and preferably 4-5 generations back...they do NOT need to be all Excellent in my opinion. That doesn't always happen. What you are looking for is a PASSING hip rating--Excellent, Good or Fair are all passing "scores". There have been parents with Fair ratings producing offspring with Excellent hips and vice versa. It's a good idea to check the pedigree of both the dam and sire and look 5 generations back to see how many offspring were produced with Degenerative Hip Disease. You don't want to see a lot of that. As for having all Excellents, that's just not going to happen. Be sure and look at the CERF and heart clearance as well. You don't want a pup from lines who produce a lot of ANY type of health issue---not just hips or elbows.


Dan Dell'Osso said:
The first and most important task, probably the most difficult, selecting a reputable breeder, unfortunately this is where I failed. My breeder had prominent hip dysplasia in two litters. Unfortunately one opf those dogs was mine. The surgery was extremely successful the cost $4,800.00. So be sure that the breeder has records of the dogs he has produced, that the breeding stock is OFA hip certified, accept notheing less that "Excellent" rating.
 

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We live in Okla, and are looking for a Golden pup. Does anyone know of a reputable breeder who could provide these clearances on their sire and dam, and that may have a current or upcoming liter. We realize that there is a good chance we may have to go "out of state" to select this puppy. Thanks so much. I am so anxious to get our new baby. Please reply ASAP
 

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jgrandstaff said:
We live in Okla, and are looking for a Golden pup. Does anyone know of a reputable breeder who could provide these clearances on their sire and dam, and that may have a current or upcoming liter. We realize that there is a good chance we may have to go "out of state" to select this puppy. Thanks so much. I am so anxious to get our new baby. Please reply ASAP
Hi jgrandstaff....welcome to the forums....

Try posting in the Member Introduction section, with the same question....or start a new thread in this same section. I think more people will see the question and you'll get more help....

Rick
 

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I agree that the breeder probably knows the most. I have bought puppies and i have raised 3 litters.. I also go through the tests, but I found that in my own litters the response varied day to day.
We also had a situation where a good friend of mine (and a pro trainer) got 3 female lab pups from excellent (field) breeding. He had the pups for a couple days at his house and picked the one he thought would be the most outgoing hard driving dog. I ended up with one of them for my son. now that they are a couple years old, my sons dog is by far the most "active" and the one that has the most talent (field).
So maybe the guys that say "just pick a good litter and take the one that pooped last so you can get safely home" have the right spin on it.
I always take a duck wing with me when picking a pup since that is what I am interested in. I want the one that goes nuts over it. but does not run off with it.
 

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jgrandstaff said:
We live in Okla, and are looking for a Golden pup. Does anyone know of a reputable breeder who could provide these clearances on their sire and dam, and that may have a current or upcoming liter. We realize that there is a good chance we may have to go "out of state" to select this puppy. Thanks so much. I am so anxious to get our new baby. Please reply ASAP
RockErin kennel is in Oklahoma. Now they have field bred goldens and I don't know if that is what you are interested in. They have an excellent reputation and their dogs would have all the clearances. here is their web site.

http://www.fieldgoldens.com/
 

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My story is a funny one on how I came to get my first golden. I had had a black lab. I did not want to compare the next puppy to him; so the vet I was working with hooked me up with a great breeder. When his female was getting ready to have puppies, he called me and told me I could have the pick of the litter. Well at five weeks, I went over to see him and the puppies. They were so adorable. Anyway, he took Shasta, the mom, over to the other side of the room and all the puppies were in a cedar bed type thing. So I walked to the other side of the room and called out, "oh puppies" very loud. Tyler, who I eventually took home, was the only puppy that came to my shoes and started untying them. I said, I will take him. Rob said, no you dont want him, he is the runt. So I said, okay. We put them all back in the cedar bed area. And once again, I called out, "oh puppies" and once again, Tyler came running over to my shoes and started untying them. I said to Rob, I am taking him. Rob again said you dont want him. He is the runt, and the vet said he is going to have trouble with one of his eyes. I said at that point, then who better than me to take him. I worked for a vet at the time, and I am not interested in showing him but just to have as a great pet and give him lots of love. So Rob agreed with me finally. I took him home at six weeks and had him for fifteen years. And as it turned out, my vet took care of most of his brothers and sisters and Tyler was the best of the litter according to Rob. So that is my story as to how I picked my first golden.
 

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I know a lot of dogs from lines like the RockErin litter and just make sure you know what you are getting into, because they are a LOT of dog ...
 
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