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I have a 7yr old Golder Retriever (Scotch), he weighs 100lbs.

I decided Scotch needed a friend so I got a 10 wk female Golden, named her Bella.

Introduced them in the back yard, Scotch didn't like her much, lots of growling and showing teeth. I figured that was normal with the I am in charge stuff.

I put away his toys and food prior to introducing them each time and he didn't seem to mind her wondering around the back yard, but very mean when the puppy got close to him or me.

This went on every few days for about one month, puppy was just about 14 weeks old and then he went past the leave me alone and took her down hard, and started tearing away at her and I had a hard time getting him off. She was bloody. Not too bad but really scared me.

Now here it is 4+ weeks later and I haven't tried again. Bella still has a scare on her snout. I keep her in the house and front yard. He is in the back yard.

I have been considering getting a muzzle and putting that on him, hoping he would finally get friendly with her, but I don't know. I have been thinking about taking them to a park, neutral ground, instead of his territory to see if that is better. But if I do the park should I use a muzzle as well. I do not want the muzzle to piss him off, and I do not want him to hurt her bad.

How do I get him to accept her?

P.S. He has had a fight somewhat recently, about 4 or so months ago when the new neighbors Boxer / Pit broke thru the fence and attacked him. They fought for a while, Scotch on the bottom most of the time. However all the bloody mess, lots, ended up being from the other dog. I wonder if that has maybe made him aggressive now. You know ... once they have had the taste of blood saying.
 

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Both your babies are so beautiful!

I also have a 7 year old male Golden and just got an 8 week old male Golden. My boy has never been violent or territorial. Has your pup ever had positive interaction and socialization with any other dogs? I think it's very important to socialize your dog with different dogs, people and surroundings as soon as you can. My boy doesn't care too much for the new puppy, doesn't ever play with him, but he never shows his teeth or growls. Are you paying your older boy enough attention or giving all the attention to the puppy? Unless you knew your older boy was accepting of other dogs entering his home (which he wasn't by the incident with your neighbors dog), you should have had them meet on neutral grounds. Bring them to a park, you with your older boy and have someone bring the puppy separately. Have them both on leashes and do not muzzle the older boy. When you meet, do not speak to the dogs as that will excite them. If both their tails are wagging and they are sniffing eachother, that's a good sign. If one of them has their tail straight up and starts growling, pull that dog away and try again after he/she has cooled off. If you think they are getting along, try going on a walk around the park with the two of them, still you handling the older boy and someone else handling the puppy. Try doing this for a week if they seem to be getting along. Until you 100% trust your older boy, don't let either of them off the leash or in your backyard together. In my opinion, if a dog is violent enough to hurt a puppy, the puppy should be rehomed as you will be putting that puppies life in danger.
 

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Pretty boys, wa scotch ever introduced to other dogs when he was young?
If yes, did he show signs of aggression towards other pets or dogs while you were walking?

After while scotch should tolerate the puppy and maybe to the point they're buds.
 

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Introducing Pup to older dog help

No the big boy, Scotch, is not neutered. Had hoped to breed him some day. Wanted to provide the experience to my kids while they are young.

Haven't had the big boy out around others since the dog next door incident. The neighbors have 4 of these boxer / pits, about 70lbs and they go crazy when I take the big boy out in the front yard to go for a walk in the neighborhood and the big boy tries to pull me down attempting to get at them so I quit trying. And the neighbor seems to be an ass. Another problem I am going to have to deal with, planning on privacy fence. The neighbors dogs do not seem to have any issue with the pup, pup even gets up somewhat close to their fence.

Yes the big boy has been around many other pets all his life. Park walks, camping trips with many people around with pets we didn't know, lots of times he was not leashed and would wonder off and meet people and pets. Never even got a bad comment from strangers that he wondered up in their camp site. We had 4 other miniature dogs that he played with some or at least tolerated in the house and back yard until a year ago.

I have been introducing the pup to other older (small) dogs and people. It has been going well. The pup is interested in them for a short time and then does her own thing as they go do their own thing. People and dogs in the neighborhood and a week camping trip recently. The big dog had to stay at home for that camping trip but it was only 30 miles away and I came home everyday and spent time with the big dog.

Bottom line is I like the ideal of attempting multiple trips to the park, me walking the big dog and brother down the road walking the pup. Paying attention to signs. Thanks for the tip as well about not talking to the dogs unless things get out of hand.

I think I will have my brother take the pup a few times by himself, and then by himself with me walking thru the park so brother can keep pup in control. Then me with big dog at a short distance on fast walk a couple times to insure pup is in control by brother. Then the casual walk by each other and meet for just a few moments. Gradually work up to hopefully the two dogs walking with my & brother down the trail for a bit, up to play play play.

Thanks again and will let you know how it goes.
 

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That sounds like a great idea. Please keep us updated. Another recommendation if that fails is to have him neutered! Having him neutered will decrease aggression.
 

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No the big boy, Scotch, is not neutered. Had hoped to breed him some day. Wanted to provide the experience to my kids while they are young.
This is a bad reason in my opinion to leave him unneutered. He is showing negative territorial behaviors now.

You say your big boy is now trying to pull you towards the neighbor's dog. He may have never shown aggression before but he is clearly showing it now.

Has the big boy been sent to the backyard to stay or does he get to come inside, too. It does not seem fair to him. He has been a family member longer. He could be fence fighting with the neighbors' dogs since they have already broken though the fence before they could do it again.

He needs training/ a dog behaviorist now! He is attacking a poor puppy it could easily be one of your kids if they step in the middle to protect the puppy. Also consider getting him neutered.
 
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Scotch & Bella Update :)

More than likely more me than them, but everyone I know tells me I am far too over protective. But what I always say better safe than sorry.

First, for those who question the jealous issue of Scotch (big boy) ... well he does love his toys and I haven't allowed that contact yet, and yes he does love his owner but I guess not as much as his new play mate & girl friend. Belly (puppy) is now 9 months old and I finally took the next big step a week ago and let Scotch meet Bella in passing in the house as it got cold outside. I normally let Scotch in during storms and when its too hot or cold outside, or just to be with the family on occasion, but always insure Bella is in her pin or my bedroom when he comes in. I have allowed him to check her out now and then while she was in her pin in the dinning room but always cautious and very worried he might bite her in the face / nose but he never did. That bite he gave her at 3 months old freaked me out, she still has a scar on her snout.

Well Bella is now at 70+ lbs, still a puppy and very active / pushy, she can knock you down in a heart beat.

I decided this past week Bella needed more than this locked up life in my house and the dinning room pin I made for her. She gets a lot of attention in the house from us, and the yard, park, and local lake. Scotch (big boy) also gets a lot of attention from us in the house, yard, park, and lake, they just have never both gotten to be together during all this.

I finally let her be roaming the house when I let Scotch out of his hiding hole in the 2nd bathroom after a storm (Scotch does't like thunder). He checked her out for about a minute and then went on outside.

Later that day I decided to do it. Took Scotch and Bell (on a leash) to the local lake, a block away, and my life has changed. Thank the Lord. No more stress, he is not going to Bite her, at least yet in a somewhat controlled environment. They played and had a great day at the lake. I will be continuing to work with both of them until I feel sure he is ready for a new play mate in the back yard. They both lay asleep at my feet while I write this, but no toys around yet. He growled a lot in the water at the lake retrieving sticks and rocks so I am still cautious.

Any how here are a few pics of the new love Golden's, Scotch & Bella :)
 

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This is an unsafe situation and is going to end badly.

You need to seek out a behaviorist or a trainer that can come to the house and help assess the situation. This is NOT normal. It needs to be dealt with immediately or you are going to have a huge problem as then the puppy may so grow up to be territorial, aggressive, and unfriendly to other dogs just like the older dog. This is also a reason not breed Scotch as no dog that acts like this should be bred, ever.

Edit- just realized I replied to an old post and that things are going better. Please be careful. This still sounds like a fragile situation. Please also consult the forum about what needs done before breeding two animals. I read that is your intention with the puppy and Scotch. I caution you to reconsider as breeding is not for the faint of heart and should be left to those that understand the pedigrees and health concerns. Each dog needs: Hip, elbow clearances via X-ray to www.offa.org. Heart & eye clearances.

Sent from my iPhone using Petguide.com Free App
 

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The recommendation to find a dog behaviorist is an important idea you should consider. I had an aggressive dog, he was not aggressive with other dogs, but he had a streak in him that eventually made him dangerous to people. Our Behaviorist was almost immediately able to provoke this aggression within a few minutes with the dog. He determined that he could be dangerous to strangers and kids. We kept him away from other people and he did fine until he got cancer and died, but it was a scary situation. But, up until we saw the Behaviorist, we did not really understand how dangerous he could be.

Also, I too have had some really great Goldens over the years and planned on breeding them. I did tons of research and determined that deciding to breed a pup you have generally is not a good way to start breeding. Just because your dog is a wonderful dog, does not mean that by breeding him you will improve the genetic pedigree pool for Goldens.

Good breeders generally try to get the very best historical genetics, behavior, and health clearances in the dogs they breed. Couple that with all the health tests, and associated costs it is really not a good idea. Of course if you plan on becoming a hobby breeder, who finds breeding stock with exceptional pedigrees, including performance titles on parents and Grandparents and clean health clearances on parents and Grandparents to become your breeding stock. Doing this is a financial risk as is breeding your own dog. After really looking on what is best for the line of Goldens and associated risks, most decide to neuter/ Spay their own pets. Additionally, it seems that your dog may have an existing behavior, that alone would negate breeding this pup. Determining, if the dog is aggressive and what caused it, will probably never be determined 100%. It could be genetics, just simple learned behavior, or a combination of both. You probably will never know for sure...but as a potential breeder, is that wise?

Good Luck
 

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Scotch & Bella Update :)

More than likely more me than them, but everyone I know tells me I am far too over protective. But what I always say better safe than sorry.

First, for those who question the jealous issue of Scotch (big boy) ... well he does love his toys and I haven't allowed that contact yet, and yes he does love his owner but I guess not as much as his new play mate & girl friend. Belly (puppy) is now 9 months old and I finally took the next big step a week ago and let Scotch meet Bella in passing in the house as it got cold outside. I normally let Scotch in during storms and when its too hot or cold outside, or just to be with the family on occasion, but always insure Bella is in her pin or my bedroom when he comes in. I have allowed him to check her out now and then while she was in her pin in the dinning room but always cautious and very worried he might bite her in the face / nose but he never did. That bite he gave her at 3 months old freaked me out, she still has a scar on her snout.

Well Bella is now at 70+ lbs, still a puppy and very active / pushy, she can knock you down in a heart beat.

I decided this past week Bella needed more than this locked up life in my house and the dinning room pin I made for her. She gets a lot of attention in the house from us, and the yard, park, and local lake. Scotch (big boy) also gets a lot of attention from us in the house, yard, park, and lake, they just have never both gotten to be together during all this.

I finally let her be roaming the house when I let Scotch out of his hiding hole in the 2nd bathroom after a storm (Scotch does't like thunder). He checked her out for about a minute and then went on outside.

Later that day I decided to do it. Took Scotch and Bell (on a leash) to the local lake, a block away, and my life has changed. Thank the Lord. No more stress, he is not going to Bite her, at least yet in a somewhat controlled environment. They played and had a great day at the lake. I will be continuing to work with both of them until I feel sure he is ready for a new play mate in the back yard. They both lay asleep at my feet while I write this, but no toys around yet. He growled a lot in the water at the lake retrieving sticks and rocks so I am still cautious.

Any how here are a few pics of the new love Golden's, Scotch & Bella :)
Hey Clyde, I'm just wondering how it all worked out? I am asking as I have an 8 yo Golden and a 17 week Golden who is frightened of the older one due in part to an over enthusiastic disciplining session. They seem to play fairly well outside but inside she keeps her distance and insists that I am bodily between her and my older dog.

Any suggestions and/or recommendations would be welcome.
 
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