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Discussion Starter #1
My puppy (female) who is 6 months old is very hyper and always up-to some mischief . Barks a lot to communicate and and doesn't listen to us at all.. often gets aggressive if we don't give her what she wants.
She is potty trained well (uses the bathroom) and knows the basics sit, paw, down,over,jump, hi-5.
Never bites us out of aggression or anger.
But lately has become just too distracted, doesn't sit in one place quietly - keeps barking if she wants something and fights alot with her brother(puppy) .

How do i try to make her less hyper if that's even a thing?
I have spoken to a dog trainer and will be taking here there probably next week.
Her brother(the male puppy) is her opposite calm and relaxed , listens to everything we say, doesn't bark and well mannered.

Any suggestion or anyone who is facing the same issue ?
How to deal with a hyper puppy?
 

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Kristy
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Do you have two littermates? Dogs are like people, they have different personality traits and temperaments and energy levels. It's very much driven by genetics and environment. Just like children, they all do best with structure and routine and consistent management and rules. Just like children, some do fine with minimal effort from the parents/owners, some require more strict enforcement of rules and structure to respect the people in charge.

It sounds like your girl is more strong willed and needs more parameters for good behavior than her brother. She will do well with obedience training with a professional teaching you and then you will have to practice DAILY to have this be effective. It needs to become part of your lifestyle and how things are run at your home. It will make a big difference in her attitude if you are consistent with making this part of your life. Discuss this idea with the trainer. You can also look up a management protocol called "Nothing in Life is Free" for dogs. The basic idea is that you control the good things/resources at your house and she needs to behave properly to receive them. Simple little things like putting her on a down/stay while you prepare her food bowl and not eating after you place the dish on the floor till you release her. Having the dog 'sit' when she wants to go out and not opening the door for her to go until she does. Having her learn commands like "place" where she goes and lies on a dog bed or a small rug during family mealtime or when you're cooking. Having her "settle" at your feet for 20 minutes while you watch a netflix show. She just needs some reminder that she can't demand everything she wants and expect you to comply. She needs leadership. THe brother is easy going and not pushing the envelope as much. He would do very well to receive the same obedience training as a way to bond with people and develop partnership. Strongly believe that all golden puppies should be in obedience class the first year or two of life. It's a foundation for the best life possible for them.
 

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Super Moderator
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3,952 Posts
Some advice:
1. Different dogs have different personalities
2. Your dog needs obedience training---low distraction followed by proofing
3. Your dog would benefit from having some kind of work.
 

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Obedience, obedience, obedience...taking her to a trainer may help her, but it will not help you control her!

Find a good obedience training class! They usually meet in the evenings for an hour once a week for 6 weeks. In that class you will learn how to train your pup. And you will actually train her to walk at heel, to sit on command, to go down on command, and most important your pup will learn to come when you call (recall)! This is important in the event she saw a cat or some other animal and bolted after it...running towards a busy street! A good class will also help you socialize your pup to other dogs and people. You can train the pup the command "Quite!" which if taught well, will stop the barking.

Check it out, it is well worth the time and effort...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do you have two littermates? Dogs are like people, they have different personality traits and temperaments and energy levels. It's very much driven by genetics and environment. Just like children, they all do best with structure and routine and consistent management and rules. Just like children, some do fine with minimal effort from the parents/owners, some require more strict enforcement of rules and structure to respect the people in charge.

It sounds like your girl is more strong willed and needs more parameters for good behavior than her brother. She will do well with obedience training with a professional teaching you and then you will have to practice DAILY to have this be effective. It needs to become part of your lifestyle and how things are run at your home. It will make a big difference in her attitude if you are consistent with making this part of your life. Discuss this idea with the trainer. You can also look up a management protocol called "Nothing in Life is Free" for dogs. The basic idea is that you control the good things/resources at your house and she needs to behave properly to receive them. Simple little things like putting her on a down/stay while you prepare her food bowl and not eating after you place the dish on the floor till you release her. Having the dog 'sit' when she wants to go out and not opening the door for her to go until she does. Having her learn commands like "place" where she goes and lies on a dog bed or a small rug during family mealtime or when you're cooking. Having her "settle" at your feet for 20 minutes while you watch a netflix show. She just needs some reminder that she can't demand everything she wants and expect you to comply. She needs leadership. THe brother is easy going and not pushing the envelope as much. He would do very well to receive the same obedience training as a way to bond with people and develop partnership. Strongly believe that all golden puppies should be in obedience class the first year or two of life. It's a foundation for the best life possible for them.
thank you for your reply, im talking to the trainer regarding the same.
i will also have to work on myself and reward her when i find her behaving well and to completely ignore the bad behavior. :)
 
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