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Owned by Buddy and Lady
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Discussion Starter #1
I took my two to be weighed Saturday. I realized that in searching for a food that wouldn't bother Buddy's alergies that I now have two overweight 5 year old Goldens. We have chosen a "lite food" but I don't want the weight to come off too fast as I assume it is not healthy. How fast should the weight loss occur. We plan on weighing them regularly.
 

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I would lower the food amount and then add vegetables like low sodium green beans. It will help to fill them up without them getting alot of extra calories. Let the weight come off slowly, it is better for their system. You can also step up the walks or off leash running times but not to much too fast.
 

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Owned by Buddy and Lady
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, we are watching closer what we feed. I am thinking that 2 lbs per month would be a good average for loosing the weight. It might take a while, but I think it would be healthier for them.
 

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To help Noah drop weight my vet said no more than a cup of food in the morning and one at night. He has dropped about five pounds, and it shows, just by doing this.

Oh he also gave me a real measuring cup that was exactly a cup, you vet might have some handy, as the cup I was using was a mug and I was using that as a "cup" and it was more like almost two.

The first week Noah was not too happy, but now he is fine with it.
 

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Definitely use a measuring cup, like Noey said, so you can keep really precise track of the food. Some people use the beans to help the dog feel fuller, but what's really important is giving an appropriate amount of food and finding good opportunities for low-impact exercise (swimming is the best).

There's no reason to use "lite" food. You can just use regular food and feed less. I think up to a pound a week is generally OK, especially at first, but two pounds a month would definitely be safe and appropriate.
 

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chew chew chew
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My vet said it depends on how much the dog has to loose, if they are a 'coffee table' and have a lot to loose she likes to get it off a bit quicker than if it's 10 lbs. So she suggests a good food (raw is ideal) with a fasting day of just a bone to keep them busy once a week.

It's like the biggest looser (which I'm hooked on now). If someone has 200 lbs to loose, and does so a pound a week, it's going to take them 4 years to get it off, meanwhile that's 4 years of added strain on their body....

Lana
 

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Owned by Buddy and Lady
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86 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the replies. We have definitely started using a regular measuring cup. We were using a Scoop from local dog food plant but I think it was measuring about 1 1/2 cups (I think it was a conspiracy because we did not use their dog food :)). We did go to a lite food at our Vet's recommendation and also we had emailed two manufactures and both had recommended lower calorie food.
Buddy has about 15 lbs to loose and Lady about 20.
Exercise has increased some and we will try to maintain through the winter.
 

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I have to agree with tippykayak on this one. There is nothing special or magical about the "light" formulas. In fact, any of them I've seen tend to have very low protein levels which seems to work at odds with your goals. If a dog is being fed fewer calories, I would want to maintain or even increase the meat protein percentage to maintain lean muscle mass. The increased carbohydrate % in most "light" formulas isn't supplying a valuable resource.

I've found that my dogs maintain their best weight and fitness when I feed them formulas with not less than 27% protein and 15% fat. My senior Bentley actually seemed somewhat flabby and less energetic when I tried a "light" formula several years ago. The old adage of "fewer calories going in than going out (increased exercise)" typically results in weight loss. I personally would want those calories to be packed with protein being dominant.
 

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I have to agree with tippykayak on this one. There is nothing special or magical about the "light" formulas. In fact, any of them I've seen tend to have very low protein levels which seems to work at odds with your goals. If a dog is being fed fewer calories, I would want to maintain or even increase the meat protein percentage to maintain lean muscle mass. The increased carbohydrate % in most "light" formulas isn't supplying a valuable resource.

I've found that my dogs maintain their best weight and fitness when I feed them formulas with not less than 27% protein and 15% fat. My senior Bentley actually seemed somewhat flabby and less energetic when I tried a "light" formula several years ago. The old adage of "fewer calories going in than going out (increased exercise)" typically results in weight loss. I personally would want those calories to be packed with protein being dominant.
MyBentley and I don't always see eye to eye on nutrition, but we're pretty close here. 27% protein is fairly high, but if your dog tolerates it well, it's probably smarter to pack the calories with protein since you're not giving all that many.
 

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Owned by Buddy and Lady
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks all for responding. I am still learning about nutrition. I did not realize the calories in protein. I googled it and found:

1 gram protein = 4 calories
1 gram carb = 4 calories
1 gram fat = 9 calories

So it makes sense that it would be better to get the calories from protein which I would believe has better building blocks for the body than carbs or fat.

We are using "Lite" right now. I hope to be able to finish this bag, (my wife would not be real happy after giving away the trial and error bags) but I think we will rethink our next step.
 
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