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Discussion Starter #1
I have two goldent retreivers.

1 is 12 years old - very well trained the old lady of the house the other is a little over 1 year old.

I trained her with the pincher just like my older golden was trained on professionally years ago.

My new golden I decided to train myself. So far she's picked up really well I think sence my older one is well trained that why my younger one has learned so quickly.

My question here is that Missy my younger one is on the pincher collar.
I would like to take her off of it and slowly use a regular collar.

The reason is that she has a little bit of crazy hair. Short not as full as my older golden. She doesn't have much hair on her neck.

Actually hardly any hair around her neck. Keep in my that the only time I use the pincher on her is for walks normally she doesn't have a collar on at all inside the house and all.

I keep the collar off as much as possible hoping for the hair to grow out some more.

Ok I'am getting off topic I think a bit.
I would like to move to a regular collar but not sure the best way to do it.
Also I need to see why she isn't growing much hair down there besides the obvious that the pincher might be pull the hair out.
It also causes marks bit looking marks.

Any advise here guys
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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I think the best collar for a golden is a Martingale style collar. It can be fit quite loose on the dog and because it tightens a bit under tension the dog can never back out of the collar.
 

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Kate
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If used properly the prong collar should not be leaving marks on your dog's neck. That said, I know one person with a doberman and another with a mastiff who both could not use prong collars with their dogs because it left a rash on the dog's necks. Both dogs had short coats and sensitive skin.

If it's leaving marks on your dog, I would keep it off and use something else like a halter or something that takes the pressure off your dog's neck and lets the skin heal.

Otherwise, what I was going to suggest is put both a regular collar and a prong collar on your dog. When your dog is walking nice and relaxed, take the prong off and let her walk on the regular collar alone.
 

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chew chew chew
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If you sew, you can make a cover for the prong - just a long tube that you slip the prong into and then it doesn't catch the hair on the neck.

To move off of the prong, just use both and switch if needed. Once they are trained they shouldn't need much correction to not pull anyway. Just like Megora suggested.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks I like your suggestion

If used properly the prong collar should not be leaving marks on your dog's neck. That said, I know one person with a doberman and another with a mastiff who both could not use prong collars with their dogs because it left a rash on the dog's necks. Both dogs had short coats and sensitive skin.

If it's leaving marks on your dog, I would keep it off and use something else like a halter or something that takes the pressure off your dog's neck and lets the skin heal.

Otherwise, what I was going to suggest is put both a regular collar and a prong collar on your dog. When your dog is walking nice and relaxed, take the prong off and let her walk on the regular collar alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks. I use it properly becaues I was trained to use one on my older dog. I think she does have sensitive skin. Because she not a really fluffy golden like my other one. Her hair is a little straw like .

She preaty good now without it but occasionally get out of hand around distractions.
 

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If your Golden's hair is truly 'straw like,' that's a classic sign of hypothyroidism. Just a thought in case there are other signs (like lethargy, obesity, temperament issues, etc.).
 

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Kate
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If your Golden's hair is truly 'straw like,' that's a classic sign of hypothyroidism. .
I had the same concern...

But not just thyoid issues. There are plenty of more serious health issues that first reveal themselves through a coarse thin coat.

I don't want to alarm you and it could also just be your dog has sensitive skin or skin allergies that are causing the coat issue, but I would probably discuss with your vet when you take your dog in for spring shots.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
She has had many regular scheduled appointments and the vet looks at here and says he sees nothing wrong.

My older golden had a thyroid issue but is cured . She doesn't seem to have a coat problem.

I want to lean along the way of it being just sensitive skin and maybe alergies


You guys scare me with the thyroid issue. I bought her pure breed. And she's only 1 year and 3 months to be exact

The vet doesn't see anything what should I do.

Does this mean I am going to have a doggie with issues. I love her so much and she is so loveable.

Maybe straw like is a bad word to use.

Her hair is not as much straw like is that its not as full and fluffy as my older golden. It's kinda short and very currly
 

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Short and curly hair doesn't indicate a problem, and neither does coarse hair. I didn't meant to scare you. It's just that "straw-like" is a really common phrase that people use to describe the improper coat that can be caused by thyroid problems, so I thought I'd mention it.

Being purebred doesn't protect a dog from having lots of health problems. Even being AKC registered doesn't mean that. Only careful breeding that follows the best practices can reduce (not eliminate, but reduce) the chance of problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks

I think when you said "Short and curly hair doesn't indicate a problem, and neither does coarse hair."

is more like it.

Wouldn't you think the vet would say something if he noticed an issue with it???????
 

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Thanks

I think when you said "Short and curly hair doesn't indicate a problem, and neither does coarse hair."

is more like it.

Wouldn't you think the vet would say something if he noticed an issue with it???????
Not necessarily. Not all vets are familiar with a proper Golden coat, and not all will identify thyroid as the cause right away.

I'm truly sorry for panicking you. Chances are that there's nothing wrong with your dog, particularly if there are no other symptoms of a thyroid problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OK thanks

I am sorta confident in my vet because he has goldents himself. Makes me sorta think everything is ok.

Thanks for the help advise
 
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