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Hi guys,

How did you all know you were ready for the responsibility of a dog, and were ready to adopt? How were you able to determine if you are financially stable for one? I found an adult golden in a nearby city shelter, and I am questioning everything.

Quick facts about me:
  • I am a 22 yr old woman, who lives alone in a dog friendly apartment
  • I work full time during the week (usually 8am-4:30pm sometimes 5pm. I do work 8am to 8pm on the last day of the month due to the nature of my work
  • I have grown up with poodles but never really owned my own dog. I am familiar with the process, but was never taking the full brunt of it
  • I would like to take the dog for a walk before and after work, but realistically that might take a bit for me to get used to doing, especially the mornings. I tend to be a lazy person so i would like some encouragement from my pet. I live 8 mins away from work.
  • my apartment is on the 5th floor but i do take an elevator. its a 1br thats roughly around 700 sq ft. I live nearby a couple of parks.
  • I live in north texas and make 54k a year (4,500/mo). After taxes, benefits and 401k, i take home around 3000.Rent is 1200 and with bills its around 1500. I put away $500 for savings.Then its food costs 300, and gas. So i am left with around 700 per month, but i been playing fast and loose with that leftover so its more like 350ish (oops, yes i know i need to tighten that up!)
  • I might get some hate for this, put he would be my ESA. I have been seeing a doctor for a bit and she has agreed to prescribe me a letter if I find the right fit. If it all goes well, no apartment dog rent nor deposit. Yes, I know an ESA is not a service animal and I wont pretend thats the case.

I can link the guy i found, but there is not much to go from. The post only states he is a golden, adult male.... and his name is houston. Thats it.

I am thinking about driving over and meeting the guy, and ask the shelter for any information but odds are they wont have any. I dont want to jump the gun and do something harsh either.

The main driving force to get a companion is that honestly? I am incredibly lonely. I tend to get in my head and struggle to make friends, so the only person I talk to is my mother and its because i cant stand the silence in my apartment at times. Dont get me wrong, I like to talk to my mom, but man its kinda sad to realize thats the only person I have to talk to. I tend to get fixated on myself in a negative way to the point that its been affecting my daily life, so I have been going to a doctor for a while. I know getting a dog wont cure the symptoms, but my therapist says it should help.

The thing is, i dont want to adopt a dog just to get attached and then realize I have to give them up because I am not ready or im not financially stable. But at the same time, the idea of being needed and loved and not be so lonely is so attractive, that I just get fixated on that and ignore the rest.

I dont know, if anyone can bring in some perspective that would be great. Its ok to get some tough love, so dont hold back.

Sorry if it got dark and gloomy at the end, i just figured its worth mentioning as well.
 

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There's nothing at all wrong w using a dog for companionship..they make great friends. A shelter pet needs a home. You might also touch base w all the GRR's in your general area- if it is a struggle to talk to others and open up, maybe just the application process would be a useful exercise whether it works out or not. Dogs are not cheap to maintain - but you do have enough loose money at the end of the month to pay for insurance (because you know no history I would keep it at least a year) and dog expenses..
 

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One basic concern is the amount of time the dog would be on his own. Golden's are social dogs who need lots of time around people. They also tend to need to be kept active. Two walks a day would be a problem as well as being left alone for such a long period of time during the day. You would need to make arrangements for dog care during the day, and also work out significant coverage for your 8 to 8 work day. Sorting out coverage will be the place to begin in terms of your consideration for the dog coming into your home.
 

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I've had dogs and a few cats all my life, I grew up with animals.

I adopted my current boy from my County Shelter. I went to meet him, knew right away he was going to be a good fit in my household. He was young-2, very gentle, knew some basic commands. I was looking for a gentle, well adjusted boy. At the time I had a young female that I adopted through a GR Rescue, she had been a former puppy mill momma and needed to be with another dog ASAP. I had just lost her 15.5 yr. old brother.

I wanted to add, I used to Volunteer with the GR Rescue that I adopted my Bridge girl from. One of things I did was shelter pulls and I evaluated dogs prior to Intake for the Rescue. So it was easier for me to determine whether or not my current boy would be a good fit.

When you adopt a dog either from a Shelter or through a Rescue, you are taking a chance and dealing with a lot of unknowns that you may not find out until months later..........

It basically boils down to whether or not you are willing to take the chance, go into it with your eyes wide open and if you adopt, I would recommend getting Pet Insurance since you won't know the dog's breeding background and if it has any medical issues or potential ones that could come up. They can get very expensive......

I will say my current boy that I adopted through my County shelter has been the easiest dog I've ever had.........

I lost my girl several years ago, he misses his sister...

With your work schedule, I would recommend having a friend, family member or maybe hiring a dog walker to come in daily to walk the dog unless you're able to come home at lunch.
 

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My 1st golden was a rescue and totally want to see all of them find homes. I've had a couple of rescues that were very laid back and quiet personalities that would have loved what you are offering. Most (not all) 2 yr old boys are very full of themselves when at a rescue... lots of pent up energy.
I think it's great you are thinking about all the possibilities but remember you are choosing a sporting dog that may not be content with a couple of walks a day. This is a breed that was built to run in the fields for HOURS every day. Not all goldens require this much activity, just saying "in general".
Like I said, I've had a couple that would have been perfect so without seeing the dog can only suggest you speak with the people/rescue group that have him. Every dog is different and every rescue is going to need time to adjust. Be sure and schedule some training classes, it's a good way to bond and learn since this is your first "on your own" dog.
Day cares are nice but can be expensive, if your thought process is to take to a dog park to burn off energy you probably are looking at the wrong breed.
The ESP angle could work in your favor as these guys can soon become the center of your life. Training, group activities and fun stuff to get you out and about but they can also become a royal pain if you aren't ready to devote the time.
This is a decision only you can answer.
 

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Go meet him. You can over think everything. There are always what if's. Well what if he works out? I would suggest either Doggie Day Care once a week or a dog walker coming in once a day.
 

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I guess that the Golden Rescue will answer your questions more than that and they will proceed if and once they believe that you can really take care of him. I am sure he has many but many applicants because many families opt for adult or enior dogs . Those families have reached their 60s , have had many dogs and they do no longer have the same physical activities that a puppy dogs need. Senior dogs also have costs and more mostly due to health. I am sure they will ask you to be covered with an insurance plan .
 

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Hi guys,

How did you all know you were ready for the responsibility of a dog, and were ready to adopt? How were you able to determine if you are financially stable for one? I found an adult golden in a nearby city shelter, and I am questioning everything.
Hello -

Having read through this thread, I (and I imagine others) am wondering what you did? Did you get the dog from the shelter? If not; care to give us a summary of how it went for you?

Doug
 

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After being totally frustrated with looking for a young to middle age adult golden from a breeder, I have started to explore rescuing a golden. This too is very complex. My local rescue ( Yankee Golden Retriever in MA) always had a fence rule (excluding seniors), but now they have a no children under 6 rule. I understand the safety and liability issues. I have expanded my search to include a mixed breeds including lab, golden, Great Pyrenees and a couple of other breeds. I have been checking petfinder daily. Would welcome any opinions about petfinder. It appears that most of the rescues use petfinder. You can sort/ filter compatibility with other dogs and children. This is helpful. Most often it is the fence that is the deal breaker.
The rescue organizations are all over the country. The background stories to these pups are often unknown or vague. I prefer a dog that is fostered in hope that the quicks are identified. Many of them are rescuing overseas pups. This, as mentioned, is another can of worms.
We are a retired couple. Our own home is on rural NH. We spend a couple of days each week in southern NH and northern MA babysitting our grand children (all 6 and under). We would always have the dog with us so I guess technically we have children under 6. I also have a 9 year old golden grand dog who spends a lot of time with us.
I have had dogs since I was 22. I have never had a dog get hurt or lost. I never had a fence except an invisible fence that my son had installed for his puppy. Invisible fences are not accepted by some organizations. I am having a side yard evaluated for a fence this Friday. The likelihood that they will be able to install in NH in Dec is very slim.. it will probably be early spring. We have only had this house for a year.
So here I am frustrated, actually angry that it is almost impossible to rescue a golden a large dog.

Welcome your comments, suggestions and thoughts. I am probably over reacting. Will probably stop the search until spring. Thanks for listening!
 

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Regarding YGRR and fencing. You can apply for a fence exclusion which means providing a detailed description as to how the dog will get sufficient exercise. As a home visitor for YGRR I have worked with a family where a fence exclusion was granted. Might want to speak directly to them about your grandkids and what the arrangement is. You never know until you ask.
 

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After being totally frustrated with looking for a young to middle age adult golden from a breeder, I have started to explore rescuing a golden. This too is very complex. My local rescue ( Yankee Golden Retriever in MA) always had a fence rule (excluding seniors), but now they have a no children under 6 rule. I understand the safety and liability issues. I have expanded my search to include a mixed breeds including lab, golden, Great Pyrenees and a couple of other breeds. I have been checking petfinder daily. Would welcome any opinions about petfinder. It appears that most of the rescues use petfinder. You can sort/ filter compatibility with other dogs and children. This is helpful. Most often it is the fence that is the deal breaker.
The rescue organizations are all over the country. The background stories to these pups are often unknown or vague. I prefer a dog that is fostered in hope that the quicks are identified. Many of them are rescuing overseas pups. This, as mentioned, is another can of worms.
We are a retired couple. Our own home is on rural NH. We spend a couple of days each week in southern NH and northern MA babysitting our grand children (all 6 and under). We would always have the dog with us so I guess technically we have children under 6. I also have a 9 year old golden grand dog who spends a lot of time with us.
I have had dogs since I was 22. I have never had a dog get hurt or lost. I never had a fence except an invisible fence that my son had installed for his puppy. Invisible fences are not accepted by some organizations. I am having a side yard evaluated for a fence this Friday. The likelihood that they will be able to install in NH in Dec is very slim.. it will probably be early spring. We have only had this house for a year.
So here I am frustrated, actually angry that it is almost impossible to rescue a golden a large dog.

Welcome your comments, suggestions and thoughts. I am probably over reacting. Will probably stop the search until spring. Thanks for listening!
I'm sorry you are having such a hard time. I hear your frustration. My current Golden I got from a Rescue site. (Ragom) They too have strict rules and I was passed over a few times. I understand why they have the rules. Most female dogs they have are retired breeding dogs that don't know how to be good family dogs, they were just used for breeding. The organization required a larger confident dog in the home to help show the rescue how to be a dog. They also required no children under 10 on some and also a fence. I have a fence but also have grandchildren who are at my home daily. I have a smaller dog so she didn't qualify as a larger confident dog. They get dogs from Turkey and China that they bring here and find homes for as well. So there is always a mix of interesting cases with each dog. I think I would say be patient and keep watching for dogs to come up. I got lucky and a puppy came up. She didn't need an older confident dog and kids weren't a problem. It was like adopting a child though the process I had to go through, and again I understand the whole process and reasoning. Hang in there and keep searching. I have been on Petfinder and I guess that can be a source of info. Good luck!
 
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