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Tess and Liza
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tess is doing pretty well on 'stay', sitting or lying down, as long as she can see me. I can move about 3,4 yards backwards and she won't move. However, if she can't see me anymore (like going around a corner), she'll be with me in a flash, to see where I've gone. Am I expecting too much of her, and should I just be working on the 'visible' stay, or is there a way to practice this with her?
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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Three months is a bit young for OOS stays..unless you have some older experienced dogs to model it for her and do them with her...

From a puppies point of view...it is not in her best interest to be 'alone'...Usually around 6 months it is much easier when, developmentally, they are stretching their wings and becoming much more independant.

You can do things like proofing her stays with you in sight...working on distance and duration, simple distractions.
Just becareful that you dont push too fast and build anxiety around stays...because that will haunt you when you start Out Of Sights...
 

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I too would not work OOS on such a youngster. She probably does not understand the stays fully yet and doing OOS will potentially cause problems - and she also probably does not yet know that you will never NOT return to her ..


When you do start OOS, talking as you are leaving her sight and while you are out of sight will help her realize you are still there, just not visible...gradually speak less and less and perhaps pop out of wherever to issue a Goood girl..again varying the time between the praie and popping back into sight.
 

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Tess and Liza
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks! I already had the feeling I was a bit ambitious. It's very funny with her, for weeks she didn't want to have to do anything with training, and the last few weeks she can't get enough!
 

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Magica Goldens
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What does she do when someone holds her and you slip out of sight (for an instant) and return. Take the "stay" part out of the equation entirely, reward her where you left her. Part of puppy learning is understanding that people can leave and they'll always come back.

Also, how much distance and duration do you have on your stays? Unless you have a SOLID 1 minute in-sight stay at 10-15' I wouldn't think about upping the complexity of the behavior by adding out of sight work.

I don't think that she's too young for OOS work, but it sounds like she's missing the larger part of the behavior chain (duration and distance).

Erica
 

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Tess and Liza
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What does she do when someone holds her and you slip out of sight (for an instant) and return.

It depends on who's holding her, but on the whole she's fine with that.

Also, how much distance and duration do you have on your stays?

Maximum distance is probably 10 ft, and duration about 20 seconds. She suddenly started 'staying' and I've been playing with that, so I hadn't even given it much thought, but this is too nice to mess up. Thanks for the advice!
 

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Thanks! I already had the feeling I was a bit ambitious. It's very funny with her, for weeks she didn't want to have to do anything with training, and the last few weeks she can't get enough!
Grins - she probably now realized that

1) Training is fun
2) She gets to spend quality time with you

It sounds like you are doing a great job.
 

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I'm another vote for waiting on teaching out of sight stays. I would very slowly work on increasing time and distance with you in sight. When you do first start out of sight stays, do it so that you can duck out for just a split second until she is more comfortable. Something like walk behind a recliner and if she's still staying duck down for just the briefest of moments, and then stand back up and build up time as she gets more confident. If you're outside, walk around a car, and the better she gets the longer you can spend walking around.

Some things you can work on to make sure she's solid before going out of sight: will she stay if you sit down in a chair? If you walk a circle around her? If you suddenly start running away from her? If she can't do things like this, then she doesn't truly understand stay yet, and needs more work.

This is something you can do between getting a solid stay with you in sight, and starting to work out of sight. Put her in a stay, and then sit in a chair behind her. She is allowed to turn her head to look at you but not move her feet. If she moves her feet, straddle her and use your feet to put hers back in position. If she is just turning her head to look at you she will eventualy get tired of holding her head in that position and will return to looking forward. That is a good way for her to get in practice of her not being able to see you but you really being right there, ready to help her if she messes up.
 

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We are just beginning a second or two of OOS stays now that Joy is 10 months old - and I do mean 1 second!

I love the ideas from the above poster - do all sorts of goofy stuff while she's in a stay! My neighbors must think I'm nuts when they see me in the yard with Joy - I'll request a stay and then jump, skip, dance around her, dart back and forth..... It's fun to think of new stuff to try! Lately, we've been working with discriminating her release word. I'll say lots of other words, but with the tone and inflection of "You're free." Also, does your dog like retrieving? We've been working holding a stay after I throw her ball. It really helps her focus her attention on me and not the ball....

Best wishes! What a lucky pup to have such a dedicated owner! Sounds like you're doing wonderfully.
 
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