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Hello,

I'm new to this forum and this is my first post. I do not participate much in forums, so excuse my ignorance on technology. I own four Goldens, brothers Spy, 10, and Hamlet, 9, 1/2 sister Mia, 8, and niece Jewel, 2. Currently I feed Taste of the Wild, salmon. Due to the ongoing nuclear disaster in Japan at Fukajima Diatchi which is spilling nuclear waste into the Pacific Ocean daily, I no longer want to feed the dogs salmon from the Pacific Ocean. My dermatology vet, Dr Brian Palmieri states that chicken is a common allergen for dogs. Hamlet is on allergy shots for allergies to humans, cats, horses, trees, grasses, and weeds. Recent routine blood work on Spy and Hamlet was described as "pristine" by my general vet.

Currently I make homemade cat food for 20 cats cooking and grinding 200 pounds of chicken monthly along with liver, hearts, gizzards, eggs, and supplements. I began making homemade cat food after one of our cats suffered a urinary blockage most likely brought on by consuming dry kibble. Research led me to Dr. Pierson who has over a decade of researching feline nutrition, commercial food, and the effects of dry food on feline health, none of if positive. Kibble leads to obesity, diabetes, urinary blockages, and poor health. I cannot afford canned wet food, and after reading Dr Pierson's extensive website I learned that commercial canned food is not very good either. After a year and half of making the cats' food I think I should investigate homemade food for the dogs. I recognize that various breeds have different needs and there are numerous diets touted for dogs, however I have not done any reading on the subject yet. I have observed that longtime breeders and handlers of dogs have a wealth of experience and knowledge regarding their specific breed of dogs, which is what brings me here.

I'm of the belief that the healthiest diet for our animals is feeding a diet that closely mimics the diet created by nature and evolution, not one that looks and sounds good to humans. Many species of animals have developed health issues due to humans over feeding, feeding foods that sound good to us, feeding for convenience, and succumbing to manufacturers slick marketing campaigns that are designed to make money for the company, with the animals' health secondary to their bottom line. Research is often driven by who paid for the study. Studies prove that pigs can fly. One just has to stop the study in time before the pig hits the ground. ;)

I am familiar with the conditions of animals at livestock markets that enter the human food chain. I am also a little familiar with the USDA regulations regarding handling of animals at livestock markets, transportation, and slaughter. In my experience the USDA rarely, if ever enforces these regulations. I have witnessed and documented blatant violations thus I have a concern not only for the animals' welfare, but also a concern for my consumption and my animals' consumption of food not raised by myself. The diseased, dying animals that enter the food chain is disgusting. A state vet confirmed many of my concerns. Obviously though it's very difficult finding healthy food, but we try.

My goal is to feed a healthy diet free of preservatives, unnecessary additives using quality ingredients, protein sources raised without antibiotics, growth hormones, genetically altered, etc, basically as close to what nature intended and their bodies have evolved to eat.

So my questions are:

Homemade recipes supported by research, such as that done by Dr Pierson whose motivation is healthier cats. Dr Pierson is not selling cat foods, and healthier cats means less business as a practicing veterinarian.

Recipes specific to needs of Goldens

Sourcing the ingredients- Rabbit comes to mind as it is a natural food for canines. I can source rabbit, there are several hutches that raise and sell rabbits for homemade feline and canine diets.

Experiences feeding homemade diets.

I appreciate the time and effort of everyone responding to this topic.

Thank you,

Christine
 

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Hello Christine,

I hope this message finds you well.

As the first time dog owner to be, I am also considering homemade food for our girl since the day she arrives at our home. I echo your philosophy that homemade food is better than commercial food because I can control what is going into the bowl of our girl. I notice that it has been quite a while since your post on this thread, and wonder have you started to supply homemade food for your four goldens? And if so, are they happy about the switch? Further, have you test-proven some recipes that can fit into goldens' diet? I know that I'm about to prepare food for a 8 weeks and yours are all grown-up, but I am eager to find out on this forum how many people are feeding homemade food for the goldens and what are there recipes.

Thank you for the time.

Cordially,
Jason D.
 

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Hello Christine,

I hope this message finds you well.

As the first time dog owner to be, I am also considering homemade food for our girl since the day she arrives at our home. I echo your philosophy that homemade food is better than commercial food because I can control what is going into the bowl of our girl. I notice that it has been quite a while since your post on this thread, and wonder have you started to supply homemade food for your four goldens? And if so, are they happy about the switch? Further, have you test-proven some recipes that can fit into goldens' diet? I know that I'm about to prepare food for a 8 weeks and yours are all grown-up, but I am eager to find out on this forum how many people are feeding homemade food for the goldens and what are there recipes.

Thank you for the time.

Cordially,
Jason D.

The OP hasn't been on since 2017.

If you wish to start a new thread, feel free to do so.
 

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The OP hasn't been on since 2017.

If you wish to start a new thread, feel free to do so.
Hello Carolina Mom,

Thank you for the comment.

I've read other threads regarding the same issue in recent days, and I just wanted to inquire into this thread because she put in effort writing this long post and no one followed up on it, plus I was also curious whether she switched or not.
 

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If you can find rabbit it is an ideal food for Goldens. I used to buy the culls (babies) from a show rabbit judge when I lived in Chattanooga- it was a fabulous source, I knew they came out of well cared for mamas and were healthy before they met their demise due to unfortunate color patterning. Dogs can eat the entire rabbit. The fur comes out with the poop but I always mused on the yard with fluff floating around after rabbit days as giving the birds a really soft nesting material.
With puppies, I offered them either ground chicken necks along with some green/purple vegs and fruits or ground rabbit or goat. I have a meat grinder and could buy 40# boxes of necks so would usually do 40-80# at a time and then freeze in small containers. Again -with puppies- I introduced whole chicken, goat, lamb and rabbit with me sitting there watching them to be sure no one started to gulp a big piece down but no one ever did. It was very relaxing to watch them work at it. Later, they did begin to eat the bones but I never found that to be an issue. I never used bones such as thigh or leg bones, just the softer ones. I didn't really have 'recipes' per se, more I kept a container in the freezer for suitable leftovers from human meals, and on the ground meals I always added to each 40# of necks a couple pounds of some leafy green frozen vegetable (like frozen collards) and a couple pounds of blueberries and maybe a few blanched carrots and the like.
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If you can find rabbit it is an ideal food for Goldens. I used to buy the culls (babies) from a show rabbit judge when I lived in Chattanooga- it was a fabulous source, I knew they came out of well cared for mamas and were healthy before they met their demise due to unfortunate color patterning. Dogs can eat the entire rabbit. The fur comes out with the poop but I always mused on the yard with fluff floating around after rabbit days as giving the birds a really soft nesting material.
With puppies, I offered them either ground chicken necks along with some green/purple vegs and fruits or ground rabbit or goat. I have a meat grinder and could buy 40# boxes of necks so would usually do 40-80# at a time and then freeze in small containers. Again -with puppies- I introduced whole chicken, goat, lamb and rabbit with me sitting there watching them to be sure no one started to gulp a big piece down but no one ever did. It was very relaxing to watch them work at it. Later, they did begin to eat the bones but I never found that to be an issue. I never used bones such as thigh or leg bones, just the softer ones. I didn't really have 'recipes' per se, more I kept a container in the freezer for suitable leftovers from human meals, and on the ground meals I always added to each 40# of necks a couple pounds of some leafy green frozen vegetable (like frozen collards) and a couple pounds of blueberries and maybe a few blanched carrots and the like.
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Hello Prism Goldens,

Thank you for your post, and your golden is cute!

Your post actually cleared another question I had on my mind, which was that can golden deboned herself or we should debone for her. It turns out and based on this post, soft bones shouldn't be a issue at all.

We also have a meat grinder, and we were considering to provide similar diet for our girl, 60% of protein like beef/chicken/turkey/salmon, 20% of grains like rice, yam, and 20% of vegetables of any sorts that will not cause an negative effect onto her. Of course this is a rough balanced diet ratio and lack any scientific grounds, and we try to reach out to a vet nutritionist to get some advice on homemade puppy meal. We also worry that if we decide to go with homemade, can our girl get enough micronutrients from the food we prepare for her, and if not, we'd take advice from other users on this forum and which is to offer mixed commercial kibbles and homemade food so that the girl can have all necessary micronutrients from the food.
 

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That was a chicken wing in the photo- they cannot eat them really at that age, but it is good 'chew bones' practice. And when dogs got older I just gave them whole rabbits or necks or whatever. You will never see cleaner teeth than those on a raw fed dog who gets to chew bones.
 

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That was a chicken wing in the photo- they cannot eat them really at that age, but it is good 'chew bones' practice. And when dogs got older I just gave them whole rabbits or necks or whatever. You will never see cleaner teeth than those on a raw fed dog who gets to chew bones.
This just echoed all other articles/posts that I read which advocated for raw feeding, and they all bragged about how clean their dog's teeth were, how shiny their dog's cost were, etc. And after reading all these, I am now more toward raw feeding than other methods.
However, I still have two questions on raw feeding.
  1. How do you prepare the raw meat? Do you put them in the freezer set at certain temperature for a few days in order to kill some known bacteria or do you have better methods to deal with bacterias?
  2. how's the deworming for the golden after they are on raw diet? Does the raw diet cause more warm in their body or less? The majority of post which advocated for raw feeing that I read stated that their dog weren't necessarily have more worms in their bodies after on the raw diet than when they were on kibble, and I'd like to confirm this with you.
Thank you.
 

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If it's helpful, Oskie is on a diet of ground up raw chicken, veggies including carrots, peppers, tomatoes, and cucumber. He also gets mushroom powder (Schrooms), and Kelp.
 

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If it's helpful, Oskie is on a diet of ground up raw chicken, veggies including carrots, peppers, tomatoes, and cucumber. He also gets mushroom powder (Schrooms), and Kelp.
Hello OscarsDad,

Thank you for the recipes! I wonder in terms of weight, how much food do you feed Oskie? Do you use a body weight-food weight ratios to determine the amount of food to feed Oskie? And within this recipes, what is the ratio of protein and veggies?
 

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Hi there. Because Osker is a bit of a chublet we are trying to get his weight down so... He gets a total of 16 ounces of ground up chicken a day, 8 ounces AM, 8 ounces PM. He is approaching 7 years old and has the metabolism of a rock. We've had thyroid testing twice with no positive results. He gets his veggies in the PM before his second chicken feeding. We just give him a bunch (not very scientific). Analysis of his chicken is 15.53 percent crude protein, Crude fat , 14.63 percent, Fiver, 5.5 percent, moisture, 68.53 percent, Ash, 2.41 percent. This diet was approved by our vet. Hope this helps.
 

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Hi there. Because Osker is a bit of a chublet we are trying to get his weight down so... He gets a total of 16 ounces of ground up chicken a day, 8 ounces AM, 8 ounces PM. He is approaching 7 years old and has the metabolism of a rock. We've had thyroid testing twice with no positive results. He gets is veggies in the PM before his second chicken feeding. We just give him a bunch (not very scientific). Analysis of his chicken is 15.53 percent crude protein, Crude fat , 14.63 percent, Fiver, 5.5 percent, moisture, 68.53 percent, Ash, 2.41 percent. This diet was approved by our vet. Hope this helps.
Hello Again OscarsDad,

This information is very helpful to us, greatly appreciated!

Jason D.
 
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