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Hi folks. New to the forum and I've read several posts re: Hip Dysplasia. Our puppy had popping hips, both sides so we took her to the vet, got radiographs and sure enough both hips are not seating into the sockets. The left worse than the right. TPO surgery was recommended immediately. This was during Thanksgiving holidays so we waited and then took her to 4 more vets. Spent a fortune on second and third and forth opinions and the answer was always the same. I've read on this forum that a lot of you don't recommend TPO surgery, but we went ahead and got the left hip fixed two weeks ago. The recovery has been amazing. After the first 5 days she was feeling much better and now she feels so good she wants out of the crate. That can't happen since there is a long recovery time, and the second hip is due in a couple of weeks. The time in the crate is the worse part. She got over the trauma of surgery very well. So all this to say, we are very glad we went ahead with the surgery. $8k
total but she will have a normal life.

I forgot to mention our puppy is named Katie. She'll be a year old in January. Excellent bloodlines, OFA cert. etc. Just goes to show you that nothing is fool proof as far as hip certs. go.

Mike
 

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Im so glad your pup will be fine!!!
 

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Hi folks. New to the forum and I've read several posts re: Hip Dysplasia. Our puppy had popping hips, both sides so we took her to the vet, got radiographs and sure enough both hips are not seating into the sockets. The left worse than the right. TPO surgery was recommended immediately. This was during Thanksgiving holidays so we waited and then took her to 4 more vets. Spent a fortune on second and third and forth opinions and the answer was always the same. I've read on this forum that a lot of you don't recommend TPO surgery, but we went ahead and got the left hip fixed two weeks ago. The recovery has been amazing. After the first 5 days she was feeling much better and now she feels so good she wants out of the crate. That can't happen since there is a long recovery time, and the second hip is due in a couple of weeks. The time in the crate is the worse part. She got over the trauma of surgery very well. So all this to say, we are very glad we went ahead with the surgery. $8k
total but she will have a normal life.

I forgot to mention our puppy is named Katie. She'll be a year old in January. Excellent bloodlines, OFA cert. etc. Just goes to show you that nothing is fool proof as far as hip certs. go.

Mike
I'm glad you got things worked out for your pup. :) It's hard when we have to deal with this at such a young age. My pup also came from good bloodlines and certified parents, but at 1 year old has a mild/moderate hip. I don't think she notices it though. ;)

Anyhow, your pup is going to be so fun once she gets past recovery!
 

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Even with the best genetics, you just never know. I'm so glad that Katie did find you, willing to give her the best of care.

Sorry about the crate time Katie, but it will be worth it when you get back out there running and goofing around pain free.

Please keep us updated on how she's doing.
 

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I am so happy to hear, that Katie has done so well with the surgery. That is wonderful, that this little Angel will be able to live a completely normal life when these surgeries are behind her! :) How very lucky she is to have an owner who is making all of this possible for her! Please...we LOVE pictures. Please share with us, your wonderful little girl!
Unfortunately yes, even with all the certifications, etc. it CAN happen. Nothing is completely fool proof. It just ensures that everything possible has been done to give the puppies the very best chance of a healthy life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the reply's. We figure when you adopt an animal of any kind you owe it to the animal to do all you can do for them. We're fortunate that we were able to afford it because in a couple of years when I retire we probably wouldn't be able to afford it. :) She has been to puppy kindergarten, obedience, rally and now has her AKC Canine good citizen award and when I told the breeder about the problem they offered to "replace her". How could anyone do that? I'll post photos as soon as I figure out how.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just an update that we took Katie in for her two week checkup and got the stitches removed. They did an x-ray of the hip and everything is perfect. Now the next surgery for the other hip is Jan. 19th. Around March 1 she'll be able to get out of the crate and be a dog again. She really wants out of there now!

Mike
 

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Welcome to the Forum, I wish it was under better circumstances, however, so glad you found us.

When my young puppy was crate bound due to elbow surgery, I worked a lot on stationary exercises (sit, stay, hold-for retrieving- and what not) it really helped with the boredom and I didn't feel as bad him being crated all the time. He also got to go to work with me (stayed in his crate) and went on frequent walks. While it wasn't fun to have him couped up, at least we made the most of it.
 

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Thanks for the reply's. We figure when you adopt an animal of any kind you owe it to the animal to do all you can do for them. We're fortunate that we were able to afford it because in a couple of years when I retire we probably wouldn't be able to afford it. :) She has been to puppy kindergarten, obedience, rally and now has her AKC Canine good citizen award and when I told the breeder about the problem they offered to "replace her". How could anyone do that? I'll post photos as soon as I figure out how.

Mike
Oh gee--I hear when something horrible happens like that, that ethical breeders will refund the price of the pup. I'm so glad your pup is recovering so well from the surgery.
 

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I had a golden who had TPO surgery at 6 months. The first hip took 6 weeks to heal and then they did the second hip. He spent most of his time in a cage or on the carpet next to his cage only when someone could sit with him. We wrapped a towel around his hind end to help him walk outside to the deck to pee. After everything he could run, walk, swim, fetch balls but I had to be careful not to over do it with him or he would become sore. His range of motion in the back legs was a bit less and he had a stiffer looking gait. Later he did get some arthritis in his front legs only but did well until I lost him to a brain tumor at age 7. I was glad I went through with the TPO surgery as he had a good quality life after.
 

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I have encountered one particular stud who has been used extensively, but who is also listed in the OFA database with a mild dysplasia rating.
The reasons given by the breeder were that the mild dysplasia rating on the OFA database was inaccurate because this dog's radiograph was not taken with the proper technique & positioning, that the breeder was told by a conformation show judge that the dog "did not look dysplastic" and that it was acceptable to "breed a dysplastic dog from a non dysplastic line" - statements which I find a bit confusing.

I have a few questions that I hope forum members can help me with:
1) If a radiograph is not taken with proper technique and positioning, would the OFA radiologists still read that film and give a rating?
2) If a dog is given a rating of "mild dysplasia" but in the breeder's opinion "did not look dysplastic" & that the film submitted was not taken properly (therefore the dysplastic rating was inaccurate), should that dog still have been bred from - without having the dog retested to confirm if it was or was not dysplastic?
3) The statement that it was acceptable to "breed a dysplastic dog from a non-dysplastic line" is also a bit confusing to me, since I assumed that dogs with a fair/mild/moderate/severe dysplasia rating should not be bred from.
 

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Wow-I have not heard of a stud being used extensively but with an OFA rating of either Mild, Moderate or Severe!

To answer your questions:

1. It is possible, if the positioning was only slightly off. I have heard of OFA refusing to rate some films because they are so bad.
2. I would never offer up a dog of mine who was not either an Excellent, Good or Fair; nor would I ever use a dog who was not rated Excellent, Good or Fair. I would use a dog if the original films were not good, the x-ray was retaken and the dog was given a number-assuming everything else in the pedigree looked good.
3. We have not yet solved the question of what causes hip dysplasia, and how much is genetic and how much environment. At this point, to the best of our knowledge, our best course is to breed only from dogs who have cleared OFA and who come from stock that has cleared OFA. OFA does say that it is better to use a Fair dog from a strong OFA background than an Excellent from a poor OFA background.

From the OFA website:

What can breeders do?

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Hip dysplasia appears to be perpetuated by breeder imposed breeding practices, but when breeders and their breed clubs recognize HD as a problem and establish reduction of HD as a priority, improvement of the hip status can be accomplished without jeopardizing other desirable traits. Prospective buyers should check pedigrees and/or verify health issues with the breeder. If suitable documentation is not available, assume the worst until proven otherwise.

Do not ignore the dog with a fair hip evaluation. The dog is still within normal limits. For example; a dog with fair hips but with a strong hip background and over 75% of its brothers and sisters being normal is a good breeding prospect. A dog with excellent hips, but with a weak family background and less than 75% of its brothers and sisters being normal is a poor breeding prospect.

OFA's Recommended Breeding Principals

Breed normals to normals
Breed normals with normal ancestry
Breed normals from litters (brothers/sisters) with a low incidence of HD
Select a sire that produces a low incidence of HD
Replace dogs with dogs that are better than the breed average
 

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Welcome to the forum Mike and Katie. I've been through the surgery with a young dog too- both elbows instead of both hips. I used the recovery time to clicker train Tango to perform lots of silly tricks like hiding her eyes with both paws for the question"Are you shy?", speak/whisper/sing the blues, and rolling a ball back to me with her nose. It stinks keeping a young dog confined, so I feel for you. Sounds like you are the most awesome owner- Katie is a lucky girl. My golden also had well-certified parents- it ups the chances of good hips& elbows, but it's not an ironclad good outcome, unfortunately. I agree that it would be impossible to send a youngster back after all that bonding and training. We did send one beautiful show puppy back to his breeder after discovering he had a grade 5 heart murmur, but in that case, he had only been with us for 24 hours. Other than those two, all my goldens have been, phew, healthy. I so hope Miss Katie continues to make a fantastic recovery, and that her other hips does equally well!
 

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Wow-I have not heard of a stud being used
From the OFA website:

What can breeders do?

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Hip dysplasia appears to be perpetuated by breeder imposed breeding practices, but when breeders and their breed clubs recognize HD as a problem and establish reduction of HD as a priority, improvement of the hip status can be accomplished without jeopardizing other desirable traits. Prospective buyers should check pedigrees and/or verify health issues with the breeder. If suitable documentation is not available, assume the worst until proven otherwise.

Do not ignore the dog with a fair hip evaluation. The dog is still within normal limits. For example; a dog with fair hips but with a strong hip background and over 75% of its brothers and sisters being normal is a good breeding prospect. A dog with excellent hips, but with a weak family background and less than 75% of its brothers and sisters being normal is a poor breeding prospect.

OFA's Recommended Breeding Principals

Breed normals to normals
Breed normals with normal ancestry
Breed normals from litters (brothers/sisters) with a low incidence of HD
Select a sire that produces a low incidence of HD
Replace dogs with dogs that are better than the breed average
Thank you for posting that. :)
I have read that and I have also heard about that OFA statement that you mentioned: that it is better to use a Fair dog from a strong OFA background than an Excellent from a poor OFA background.

But as I understand it, that statement applies to dogs with a FAIR hip evaluation, because as per OFA's statement on their webpage - a dog with a FAIR rating "is still within normal limits."

It was my understanding that dogs with a MILD hip evaluation should not be used in a breeding program, or should at least be retested (if in the breeder's opinion, the rating was inaccurate) prior to their being used in a breeding program.
 

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Thank you for posting that. :)
It was my understanding that dogs with a MILD hip evaluation should not be used in a breeding program, or should at least be retested (if in the breeder's opinion, the rating was inaccurate) prior to their being used in a breeding program.
Exactly-Mild is NOT Normal. If positioning was the problem, that is easily corrected by finding a vet experienced in doing OFA x-rays and redoing the hips.

Your PM did not come through with the OFA link :( but thanks for the thought. I think you need 15 posts before you can PM.
 
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