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Hi everyone,
Our beautiful Casey recently passed away. We were lucky to have 13 blessed years with him.

We have been researching breeders, their breeding dogs and their upcoming litters.

There will be an upcoming litter at a respected kennel. However, the OFA hip clearance for the dam is rated as fair. Sire's clearance is rated as good.

Should we have any concerns regarding the hips with a pup from this litter?

Thanks!
 

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My FAIR bitch produced a GOOD bitch for me. In turn, my FAIR bitch's dam was GOOD, but her mother and pretty much the rest of her dam line was FAIR. My GOOD's and 1 FAIR are all equally sound. FAIR is passing, it is not a flunk. However, I have always bred my FAIR bitch to GOOD's. The only time I have bred to a FAIR stud dog is with a GOOD bitch. Excellents in the golden World are few and far between and in my experience do not insure that the pups are more sound.... in fact, excellents also produce dysplasia. I wouldn't worry... instead I would look to the depth of pedigree and would want strong clearances(5 generations at least) behind both parents.
 

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Yep, what they said. "Fair" is a passing hip score. And as others stated even an "Excellent" does not guarantee anything when you are dealing with genetics. What would be more revealing is what are the the hip scores of the ancestors behind both the stud and dam. Ideally you want a long history of passing scores on both sides.
 
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Today is probably a bad day for me to be responding to this, but I will anyway. We just found out on Saturday that our girl, Chloe, whose pedigree has 5+ generations of health clearances including hip clearances behind her, may be dysplastic. In the past 2 weeks since we've been waiting for the OFA prelim report to arrive to confirm our radiologists opinion, I've been doing excessive amounts of research on what could have "caused" it. I've scoured her pedigree (horizontally and vertically) and even with the amount of clearances behind her there is no way to guarantee anything. Her sire has been bred quite a lot, and has thrown a couple dogs with elbow or hip issues. Statistically it just happens. If the experts knew what caused it, then it would be eliminated. FWIW, our boy has the potential to come back "excellent" on his finals, and we did everything exactly the same with them with regards to nutrition and supplements. There's just no way to know what is going to happen. But you certainly need to stack the deck in your favor by researching the pedigree and finding a breeding with generations of clearances behind it.
 

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goldenjackpuppy, sometimes by 2 years they clear.... It's all about opinions, etc... I know dogs read out as dysplastic that were "Good" eventually. This is why I don't do prelims (the other reason is that the dogs in this house are going nowhere). However if there are blatant things on the rads...
 
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Today is probably a bad day for me to be responding to this, but I will anyway. We just found out on Saturday that our girl, Chloe, whose pedigree has 5+ generations of health clearances including hip clearances behind her, is dysplastic. In the past 2 weeks since we've been waiting for the OFA prelim report to arrive to confirm our radiologists opinion, I've been doing excessive amounts of research on what could have "caused" it. I've scoured her pedigree (horizontally and vertically) and even with the amount of clearances behind her there is no way to guarantee anything. Her sire has been bred quite a lot, and has thrown a couple dogs with elbow or hip issues. Statistically it just happens. If the experts knew what caused it, then it would be eliminated. FWIW, our boy has the potential to come back "excellent" on his finals, and we did everything exactly the same with them with regards to nutrition and supplements. Looking at their xrays next to each other was just astounding. His hips are perfect and hers are SO not. There's just no way to know what is going to happen. But you certainly need to stack the deck in your favor by researching the pedigree and finding a breeding with generations of clearances behind it.
So very sorry for the bad news. Hope all goes well, as well as it can.
As to the OP's question I think you need to look at the pedigree back as many generations as you can, but generally fair is fine.
 

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goldenjackpuppy, sometimes by 2 years they clear.... It's all about opinions, etc... I know dogs read out as dysplastic that were "Good" eventually. This is why I don't do prelims (the other reason is that the dogs in this house are going nowhere). However if there are blatant things on the rads...
We're going to do them again at age two and hope for a miracle, but I'm not holding my breath. The only thing that may have impacted it is that she was 2 weeks out of season, so I'm wondering if that could have been part of it. Again, we're not doing anything drastic until she turns 2 and get a final report.
 

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OFA says to wait a month before or after heat... that's why Basil hasn't been done yet(waiting for the heat). I did Tiki close to coming out of heat because I had been thru an aborted litter with her 1/2 sister on 9/11 and figured I'd let all of the bad news come at once. Tiki ended up FAIR, but she is as sound as every other dog in this house. And she has so far produced sound pups(of course, she is spayed now). I have seen so many change at 2 years that I think it is worth the wait.
 

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My boy's parents were Fair and Good, and he came back Excellent (yes I will continue to post this on every hip thread, because I love it! LOL)
 

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Today is probably a bad day for me to be responding to this, but I will anyway. We just found out on Saturday that our girl, Chloe, whose pedigree has 5+ generations of health clearances including hip clearances behind her, may be dysplastic. In the past 2 weeks since we've been waiting for the OFA prelim report to arrive to confirm our radiologists opinion, I've been doing excessive amounts of research on what could have "caused" it. I've scoured her pedigree (horizontally and vertically) and even with the amount of clearances behind her there is no way to guarantee anything. Her sire has been bred quite a lot, and has thrown a couple dogs with elbow or hip issues. Statistically it just happens. If the experts knew what caused it, then it would be eliminated. FWIW, our boy has the potential to come back "excellent" on his finals, and we did everything exactly the same with them with regards to nutrition and supplements. Looking at their xrays next to each other was just astounding. His hips are perfect and hers are SO not. There's just no way to know what is going to happen. But you certainly need to stack the deck in your favor by researching the pedigree and finding a breeding with generations of clearances behind it.
Where is she in regard to her heat cycle. I don't do xrays on girls who are about 4 months past heat(would be around the time they are sending puppies home, IF they had been bred). I have many breeder friends who have done them at that time and when done at a different time, the hips were rated as good. Heat cycles are part of it, too. So, don't throw in the towel, just yet.

If you need/want to talk privately, I am more than happy to.

As to the OP, absolutely, there is no problem with breeding a FAIR. FAIR, GOOD and EXCELLENT are all passing grades with the OFA and there are very small differences in one from the other with no guarantees on any of them. :)

Jennifer
Harborview Goldens
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you to all who responded. Our first golden developed lymphoma at age 2 1/2. Thankfully, Casey lived a relatively healthy life until that dreadful last day when he died likely due to a hemangiosarcoma bleed.

Although the urge is to go out and get another puppy right away, I want to research the breeding of a potential pup as far as I understand. I do realize that often the best laid plans can go awry.

Thanks once again.
 
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