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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a 12 wk old puppy who is way too rough!!! I know that all puppies mouth, but hers is more like attack and bite hard. We have her in puppy class, tried, ignoring, she continues to chase and bite. We tried blowing in her face, putting our thumb under her tongue, time outs in the laundry room and nothing seems to work. She has really long walks, tons of toys training daily, this does not :mad:work. Even the trainer and vet say she has a really hard bite. She chases my kids down, jumps and bites at them or their clothes. I know it is play, but she has broken skin and ripped clothes. Any suggestions would be appreciated. We love her and want to train her to stop being so rough.:(
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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You will find tons of threads on this subject. Baby goldens tend to be little land sharks. What has worked for me is to say OUCH loudly and give the pup an appropriate toy as a replacement.
 

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you're not doing anything wrong. we got layla, our golden, at around 8 weeks. after the first week, she was a monster. we were almost afraid we couldn't keep her or if she had a bad line of aggression. layla has even drawn blood multiple times from us.

i'm not saying it's not scary/alarming, especially if you have children, but she's a puppy. she has 20 teeth bursting through her gums and she just wants to chew, bite, gnaw, and nip.

all i can provide is empathy because we have all been there. i can assure you that it's just a phase and she will grow out of it. at 4 mos, when layla started losing little teeth, she calmed down. the only thing i found that helped our "wild puppy phase" was another dog to tire her out, a dog park, or letting her run around until all she wanted to do was sleep. :)
 

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Tess and Liza
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My puppy is 14 weeks now. What seems to work with her is having her lick our fingers and hands (put peanutbutter or applesauce or yoghurt on them). Every time she licks we say in a really nice voice: "Good kiss, Tess!" When she starts to bite, we tell her: "Kiss, Tess, no bite!" It doesn't always work, but she seems to get the picture.
 

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I used to yelp, loud, if Zeppy got too rough when he was a puppy. Funny to watch, but worked with Zep.

Also, i'd put his paw in his mouth and make him bite that. He seemed to realize that it was too rough when he was biting himself.

Have you tried a frozen washcloth yet? I used to wet a washcloth, roll it up and stick it in the freezer. He really liked to chew on that, must have felt good on those teeth!

Good luck and hang in there, it will get better!
 

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When are these crazy puppy attacks most likely to happen? When the children are playing? When there is a lot of activity? Just at random times? Even when things are otherwise calm and quiet in the house?

Our puppy, Barney, is now 16 weeks and I was a bit worried and frustrated for a bit. But, Barney is now calming down quite a bit. We're not out of the woods yet, but he is so much better than he was a few weeks ago.

I think young puppies are very easy to wind up, so you need to keep things calm and respond in a calm way when you see your puppy start to get out of hand.

Are you crate training? You mentioned putting the puppy in the laundry room for time-outs, but I wonder if there is still too many interesting things in there to have it really do the trick. We've found that a brief timeout for Barney in his crate, which isolates him from the stimulation overload, really helps to calm him. I believe it has also really helped him to understand (or start to understand) what behavior is OK, and what behavior is going to trigger the time out.

One last note: I think consistency is huge, and it's something we've struggled with. Playing with the puppy and putting up with the nips sometimes, but being upset with him other times sends mixed messages. I believe you, and the whole family, really need to consistently and immediately draw the line when the behavior starts getting rough.

Good Luck!!
 

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When are these crazy puppy attacks most likely to happen? When the children are playing? When there is a lot of activity? Just at random times? Even when things are otherwise calm and quiet in the house?

Our puppy, Barney, is now 16 weeks and I was a bit worried and frustrated for a bit. But, Barney is now calming down quite a bit. We're not out of the woods yet, but he is so much better than he was a few weeks ago.

I think young puppies are very easy to wind up, so you need to keep things calm and respond in a calm way when you see your puppy start to get out of hand.

Are you crate training? You mentioned putting the puppy in the laundry room for time-outs, but I wonder if there is still too many interesting things in there to have it really do the trick. We've found that a brief timeout for Barney in his crate, which isolates him from the stimulation overload, really helps to calm him. I believe it has also really helped him to understand (or start to understand) what behavior is OK, and what behavior is going to trigger the time out.

One last note: I think consistency is huge, and it's something we've struggled with. Playing with the puppy and putting up with the nips sometimes, but being upset with him other times sends mixed messages. I believe you, and the whole family, really need to consistently and immediately draw the line when the behavior starts getting rough.

Good Luck!!
i would not do time-out in the crate. i made that mistake when layla started getting too wild, and it definitely brings a negative association to the crate, especially if they sleep there.

big big big mistake. from my experience, at least! a crate should be a calm, safe, happy place for the pup.

otherwise, i agree completely.
 

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Humankind. Be both.
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Just a note on time outs in a crate... One thing that helps prevent the negative assn is how you go about putting the pup in there. If you're angry and go about it in an, "Alright! THAT'S IT!! TIME OUT!!!" and shove the pup in the crate, you can quickly get a negative assn. If you look at it more like a cooling off period for both of you, and you crate him up with more of a "Go in your house. Good dog..." kind of attitude, then you get the benefits of the pup calming down b/c he can no longer run around and get worked up, pluse YOU get a break from the little land shark! ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We don't use the crate for time out. We put her in the boring laundry room. Nothing in there but the washer and dryer. She cries for a second, but does calm down. Thanks for all the help.
 

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Leo was vicious with his mouth when he was a puppy. I learned real quick to not move my hand, arm, or whatever appendage he had hold of. :) The dog behaviorist I worked with told me that Leo had to learn bite inhibition.

I did use then hand in the mouth technique. Leo would bit me. Carefully I would insert my hand in his mouth till he was unable to bite down. Hold it for a second or two then I presented my hand and if he would not bite me he got major praises and petting and sometimes a treat. If he would bite again the hand would go back in the mouth. I never raised my voice or for that matter vocally acknowledge him until he gave me the best behavior.
 

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I have to echo what everyone else is saying: It WILL get better. At 12 weeks, not sure I would have believed it either, but here we are now and Maggie is 16 weeks and she lost several teeth this week, she sits quietly in the evening with her bones for 45 minutes to an hour, and we can actually have a conversation! Now she still has her moments/days but our evenings are vastly different from the way they were just weeks ago. So hang in there.

Also, just keep trying different ideas people share. Not everything works with every dog. I just picked up a great idea last week and started to use it with Maggie (sorry that I can't remember whose idea it was to give proper credit here--please forgive me). It was to put a treat in your fist and show the pup a little bit of it. Tell her "gentle" as she reaches for it (hold on tight). If she uses any hard touch/teeth, back off. It's also a good way to help the pups deal with frustration. Maggie wanted it to badly and she knew exactly what she was supposed to do to get it finally.

We also freeze ice cubes with blobs of peanut butter in them. Maggie loves them and works hard to get to the pb. Frozen carrots keep her occupied too.

This forum was a great comfort to me to realize my puppy was normal--not insane or not absurdly aggressive, just normal. And that gave us the confidence to keep pushing through! (But try to enjoy it as well--take lots of pictures--it's amazing how fast they grow up!!)
 

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Payton is the exact same way. We have tried everything I've seen on this forum and nothing has worked. She's started loosing teeth so I'm hoping we are coming to the end of this craziness.
 

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i would not do time-out in the crate. i made that mistake when layla started getting too wild, and it definitely brings a negative association to the crate, especially if they sleep there.

big big big mistake. from my experience, at least! a crate should be a calm, safe, happy place for the pup.

otherwise, i agree completely.
We have been aware of the danger of negative associations for the crate. As FlyingQuizini talked about, we put Barney in the crate in a very calm manner, not substantially different than normal nap or sleep times.

When he's riled up, we don't yell at him or even ask him to go to the crate. I just calmly pick him up, speak to him gently, and carry him to his crate, then ask him to go in.

So far, so good. Barney is always perfectly content to go to his crate, and he settles down in there right away. Sometimes the time out is 15 minutes, sometimes he was ready for a nap and it's a couple hours.

Works for us but, as they say, YMMV.
 
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